Cover: A Theory of Justice: Revised Edition, from Harvard University PressCover: A Theory of Justice in PAPERBACK

A Theory of Justice

Revised Edition

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PAPERBACK

$39.00 • £31.95 • €35.00

ISBN 9780674000780

Publication Date: 09/30/1999

Short

560 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

12 line illustrations

Belknap Press

World

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  • Preface for the Revised Edition
  • Preface
  • Part One. Theory
    • Chapter I. Justice as Fairness
      • 1. The Role of Justice
      • 2. The Subject of Justice
      • 3. The Main Idea of the Theory of Justice
      • 4. The Original Position and Justification
      • 5. Classical Utilitarianism
      • 6. Some Related Contrasts
      • 7. Intuitionism
      • 8. The Priority Problem
      • 9. Some Remarks about Moral Theory
    • Chapter II. The Principles of Justice
      • 10. Institutions and Formal Justice
      • 11. Two Principles of Justice
      • 12. Interpretations of the Second Principle
      • 13. Democratic Equality and the Difference Principle
      • 14. Fair Equality of Opportunity and Pure Procedural Justice
      • 15. Primary Social Goods as the Basis of Expectations
      • 16. Relevant Social Positions
      • 17. The Tendency to Equality
      • 18. Principles for Individuals: The Principle of Fairness
      • 19. Principles for Individuals: The Natural Duties
    • Chapter III. The Original Position
      • 20. The Nature of the Argument for Conceptions of Justice
      • 21. The Presentation of Alternatives
      • 22. The Circumstances of Justice
      • 23. The Formal Constraints of the Concept of Right
      • 24. The Veil of Ignorance
      • 25. The Rationality of the Parties
      • 26. The Reasoning Leading to the Two Principles of Justice
      • 27. The Reasoning Leading to the Principle of Average Utility
      • 28. Some Difficulties with the Average Principle
      • 29. Some Main Grounds for the Two Principles of Justice
      • 30. Classical Utilitarianism, Impartiality, and Benevolence
  • Part Two. Institutions
    • Chapter IV. Equal Liberty
      • 31. The Four-Stage Sequence
      • 32. The Concept of Liberty
      • 33. Equal Liberty of Conscience
      • 34. Toleration and the Common Interest
      • 35. Toleration of the Intolerant
      • 36. Political Justice and the Constitution
      • 37. Limitations on the Principle of Participation
      • 38. The Rule of Law
      • 39. The Priority of Liberty Defined
      • 40. The Kantian Interpretation of Justice as Fairness
    • Chapter V. Distributive Shares
      • 41. The Concept of Justice in Political Economy
      • 42. Some Remarks about Economic Systems
      • 43. Background Institutions for Distributive Justice
      • 44. The Problem of Justice between Generations
      • 45. Time Preference
      • 46. Further Cases of Priority
      • 47. The Precepts of Justice
      • 48. Legitimate Expectations and Moral Desert
      • 49. Comparison with Mixed Conceptions
      • 50. The Principle of Perfection
    • Chapter VI. Duty and Obligation
      • 51. The Arguments for the Principles of Natural Duty
      • 52. The Arguments for the Principle of Fairness
      • 53. The Duty to Comply with an Unjust Law
      • 54. The Status of Majority Rule
      • 55. The Definition of Civil Disobedience
      • 56. The Definition of Conscientious Refusal
      • 57. The Justification of Civil Disobedience
      • 58. The Justification of Conscientious Refusal
      • 59. The Role of Civil Disobedience
  • Part Three. Ends
    • Chapter VII. Goodness and Rationality
      • 60. The Need for a Theory of the Good
      • 61. The Definition of Good for Simpler Cases
      • 62. A Note on Meaning
      • 63. The Definition of Good for Plans of Life
      • 64. Deliberative Rationality
      • 65. The Aristotelian Principle
      • 66. The Definition of Good Applied to Persons
      • 67. Self-Respect, Excellences, and Shame
      • 68. Several Contrasts between the Right and the Good
    • Chapter VIII. The Sense of Justice
      • 69. The Concept of a Well-Ordered Society
      • 70. The Morality of Authority
      • 71. The Morality of Association
      • 72. The Morality of Principles
      • 73. Features of the Moral Sentiments
      • 74. The Connection between Moral and Natural Attitudes
      • 75. The Principles of Moral Psychology
      • 76. The Problem of Relative Stability
      • 77. The Basis of Equality
    • Chapter IX. The Good of Justice
      • 78. Autonomy and Objectivity
      • 79. The Idea of Social Union
      • 80. The Problem of Envy
      • 81. Envy and Equality
      • 82. The Grounds for the Priority of Liberty
      • 83. Happiness and Dominant Ends
      • 84. Hedonism as a Method of Choice
      • 85. The Unity of the Self
      • 86. The Good of the Sense of Justice
      • 87. Concluding Remarks on Justification
  • Conversion Table
  • Index

Awards & Accolades

  • 1972 Ralph Waldo Emerson Award, Phi Beta Kappa Society
  • John Rawls Is a 1999 National Humanities Medal Winner
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