THE I TATTI RENAISSANCE LIBRARY
Cover: History of the Florentine People, Volume 2: Books V–VIII, from Harvard University PressCover: History of the Florentine People, Volume 2 in HARDCOVER

The I Tatti Renaissance Library 16

History of the Florentine People, Volume 2

Books V–VIII

Leonardo Bruni

Edited and translated by James Hankins

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$31.00 • £24.95 • €28.00

ISBN 9780674010666

Publication: November 2004

Short

Bruni, in trying to demonstrate that Florence could trace its legitimate republican tradition back to deep antiquity, wrote a history of his city on the model of the ancient history of Rome by Livy. As he did so, he read Livy’s eloquent, stagy book in a very imaginative, critical way. From the ancient historian’s idealized account of virtuous Romans, Bruni reconstructed the virtuous and powerful world of their enemies, the Etruscans—from whom, he claimed, the modern Tuscans were descended. In Bruni’s historical imagination, Livy’s stories of Horatius, heroically defending the bridge across the Tiber, and Mucius Scaevola, thrusting his hand into the fire to show his contempt for death, metamorphosed into instances of Roman weakness, superstition and dishonesty.—Anthony T. Grafton, The New York Review of Books

The Loeb Classical Library…has been of incalculable benefit to generations of scholars… It seems certain that the I Tatti Renaissance Library will serve a similar purpose for Renaissance Latin texts, and that, in addition to its obvious academic value, it will facilitate a broadening base of participation in Renaissance Studies… These books are to be lauded not only for their principles of inclusivity and accessibility, and for their rigorous scholarship, but also for their look and feel. Everything about them is attractive: the blue of their dust jackets and cloth covers, the restrained and elegant design, the clarity of the typesetting, the quality of the paper, and not least the sensible price. This is a new set of texts well worth collecting.—Kate Lowe, The Times Literary Supplement

An aristocratic devotion to our culture continues to manifest itself even today in the most prestigious centers of study and thought. One has merely to look at the very recent (begun in 2001), rigorous and elegant humanistic series of Harvard University, with the original Latin text, English translation, introduction and notes.—Vittore Branca, Il Sole 24 Ore