Cover: Historical Ontology, from Harvard University PressCover: Historical Ontology in PAPERBACK

Historical Ontology

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$31.00 • £24.95 • €28.00

ISBN 9780674016071

Publication Date: 09/15/2004

Short

288 pages

6 x 9 inches

World

What, asks Ian Hacking in Historical Ontology, do I mean by live skepticism? His answer is that it is desirable to be ‘genuinely in doubt and terrified that one’s doubt might be warranted.’ It’s a healthy position for an enquirer into how new concepts and objects emerge in the province of philosophers and inventors, the novel uses of words and new ways of reasoning, and new interplays of power and knowledge. His essays demand attention and close reading.—Maggie McDonald, New Scientist

[Hacking] focuses on the interactions between what there is (or comes to be) and our concepts thereof. The kinds of objects he considers, both of which he regards as historical, are Aristotelian universals and their instances. He emphasizes that not only do ordinary physical objects and people and their institutions begin, develop, and end, but so do concepts, e.g., those language, knowledge, a child, (psychic) trauma, and scientific reasoning… Stimulating, incisive, and clear even in expounding theories of unclear writers.—Robert Hoffman, Library Journal

Awards & Accolades

  • Ian Hacking Is Winner of the 2009 Holberg International Memorial Prize
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