I TATTI STUDIES IN ITALIAN RENAISSANCE HISTORY
Cover: Reading Lucretius in the Renaissance, from Harvard University PressCover: Reading Lucretius in the Renaissance in HARDCOVER

Reading Lucretius in the Renaissance

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HARDCOVER

$41.00 • £32.95 • €37.00

ISBN 9780674725577

Publication: October 2014

Text

416 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

26 halftones, 6 tables

I Tatti Studies in Italian Renaissance History

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  • List of Tables and Figures*
  • Preface
  • 1. Religion Trampled Underfoot: Epicurus, Atomism, Atheism, and Skepticism in the Renaissance
  • 2. Unchristian Opinion: Lucretius’s First Renaissance Readers
  • 3. Between Fits of Madness: Ancient References and Proto-Biographies
  • 4. The Lofty Madness of Wise Lucretius: The Renaissance Biographies
  • 5. The Poverty of the Language: The Lucretian Print Tradition
  • Conclusion: Deceived but Not Betrayed
  • Appendix A: Lucretius Manuscripts
  • Appendix B: Capitula
  • Appendix C: Lucretius Editions
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index
  • * Tables and Figures
    • Tables
      • 2.1. Manuscript sizes and materials
      • 2.2. Frequency of annotation in different types of Lucretius manuscripts
      • 2.3. Frequency of the types of nonphilosophcal annotation in Lucretius manuscripts
      • 2.4. Frequency of different types of annotation in Lucretius manuscripts
      • 3.1. Renaissance Lucretius biographies
      • 3.2. References to classical and medieval authors in biographies and quotation lists
      • 4.1. Renaissance Lucretius biographies and their revisions
      • 5.1. Chronology of Lucretius editions and related works
    • Figures
      • 1. Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana Vat. Lat. 3276, fol. 132v. De rerum natura V, showing rubricated capitula and inexpensive ink decoration.
      • 2. Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana Ott. Lat 1954, fol. 98r. De rerum natura IV 1165–1187, with anonymous Greek annotation providing the equivalents of the transliterated nicknames for lovers.
      • 3. Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana Vat. Lat. 3276, fol. 94v. De rerum natura III 1033–1050, with marginal annotation marking the names of famous men in the underworld.
      • 4. British Library I. A. 23564 (1495), fol. aiiiir. De rerum natura III 112–140, with Girolamo Borgia’s transcription of Pontano’s notes, marking the names of famous men in the underworld.
      • 5. Piacenza Landi Cod. 33, fol. 51r. Illustration depicting the ostomachion of Archimedes.
      • 6. Piacenza Landi Cod. 33, fol. 100r. Illustration depicting possible shapes of atoms, accompanying De rerum natura IV 647–672.
      • 7. Piacenza Landi Cod. 33, fol. 131r. The zodiac in alignment, illustrating De rerum natura V 691–704, labeled “Figura totius mundi et ostensio orbito coelestium planetarum.”
      • 8. Piacenza Landi Cod. 33, fol. 131v. Illustration depicting the Sun’s orbit with variable center, illustrating De rerum natura V 691–704, labeled “Demonstratio inequalitatis dierum et noctium propter varium solis cursum.”
      • 9. Piacenza Landi Cod. 33, fol. 132r. Illustration depicting the relative positions of Sun, Moon, and Earth, illustrating De rerum natura V 691–704, labeled “Demonstratio quanto luna vicinior sit terrae.”
      • 10. Piacenza Landi Cod. 33, fol. 132v. The twelve winds, illustrating De rerum natura V 691–704, labeled “Demonstratio duodecim ventorum.”
      • 11. Piacenza Landi Cod. 33, fol. 133r. Illustration depicting the eight wind theory, labeled “Superior demonstratio octo ventorum est secundum Phavorinum Gelianum.”
      • 12. Piacenza Landi Cod. 33, fol. 134r. Illustration depicting phases of the moon, labeled “Demonstratio quomodo luna crescens sive nova lumen a sole recipiat recedendo a sole orientem versus. ut patet inspicienti.”
      • 13. Piacenza Landi Cod. 33, fol. 134v. Illustration depicting phases of the moon, labeled “De Anni Temporibus.”
      • 14. Piacenza Landi Cod. 33, fol. 136r. Illustration depicting eclipses, illustrating De rerum natura V 771.
      • 15. Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana Ross. Lat. 884, fol. 25r. Text of De rerum natura in the hand of Niccolo Machiavelli, with his marginal note marking the description of the atomic swerve “motum varium esse et ex eo nos liberam habere mentem” (that motion is variable, and from this we have free will).
      • 16. Detail of Machiavelli’s note on Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana Ross. Lat. 884, fol. 25r.
      • 17. Naples Naz. IV E 51, fol. 66r. De rerum natura III 405–426, with notes of Pomponio Leto, including the capitulum “Animam nativam & mortalem esse” and note “opinio non christiana” at 417.
      • 18. Naples, Naz. IV E 51, front of inner flyleaf. Pomponio Leto’s index of the vocabulary that he noted in the margins of the manuscript, listed by page number.
      • 19. Naples Naz. IV E 51, fol. 71v. De rerum natura III 661–685, with notes of Pomponio Leto, including the marginal labels “Contra pythagorani…” and “Contra platonem…”
      • 20. Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana Ott. Lat. 2834, fol. 1r. De rerum natura I 1–27, white vine decoration and notes of Pomponio Leto or his circle.
      • 21. Utrecht, University Library. X fol. 82 (Rariora), fol. aiiir. A copy of the 1486 Verona edition, showing I 112–149, with “Clyo” printed by I 119, the capitulum “Nihil de nihilo gigni,” and handwritten notes of Pomponio Leto.
      • 22. Bayerische Staatsbibliothek München Cod. lat. mon. 816a, fol. 27r. A manuscript that belonged to Piero Vettori, showing the notes “tenuis bissilabum” (tenuis scanned as two syllables) at De rerum natura II 232, and “Absurditas in sententia” (absurd in my opinion) beside the discussion of the atomic swerve at II 244.
      • 23. The Bodleian Libraries, the University of Oxford, Auct. 2 R 4.50 (1500), p. 15. The 1500 print edition, showing De rerum natura I 509–545, a copy formerly owned by Donato Giannotti, with marginalia discussing Aristotle.
      • 24. The Bodleian Libraries, the University of Oxford, Byw. P 6.13 (1565–1566), handwritten end flyleaf 1. A copy of the 1565–1566 edition of Lucretius, showing manuscript quotations from Cicero, Cornelius Nepos, Vitruvius, and Ovid.
      • 25. The Bodleian Libraries, the University of Oxford, Byw. P 6.13 (1565–1566), handwritten end flyleaf 2. Manuscript quotations from Quintilian, Statius, and Serenus.
      • 26. Title page of Inc. 5271, Houghton Library, Harvard University. A copy of the 1495 edition, possibly used by Avancius in preparing the 1500, with quotations from Eusebius-Jerome, Cicero, Varro, Macrobius, and the Wormwood passage, De rerum natura I 936.