Cover: Accounting for Slavery: Masters and Management, from Harvard University PressCover: Accounting for Slavery in HARDCOVER

Accounting for Slavery

Masters and Management

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$35.00 • £27.95 • €31.50

ISBN 9780674972094

Publication: August 2018

Academic Trade

312 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

28 halftones, 2 charts, 2 graphs, 2 tables

World

Slavery in the United States was a business. A morally reprehensible—and very profitable business. Much of the research around the business history of slavery focuses on the horrors of the trans-Atlantic slave trade and the business interests that fueled it. The common narrative is that today’s modern management techniques were developed in the factories in England and the industrialized North of the United States, not the plantations of the Caribbean and the American South. According to a new book by historian Caitlin Rosenthal, that narrative is wrong… Rosenthal argues that slaveholders in the American South and Caribbean were using advanced management and accounting techniques long before their northern counterparts. Techniques that are still used by businesses today.Marketplace (American Public Media)

[This] history of the accounting and management of slave plantations in the Americas goes a long way towards puncturing common-sense narratives of free market economics.—Martin Myers, Times Higher Education

Full of insights into the history of Atlantic slavery, Accounting for Slavery will force its readers to look with fresh eyes at the many freedoms and unfreedoms of the modern American workplace. This is an original book, which uniquely draws from and speaks to many disciplines, while written compellingly for a wide audience.—Jonathan Levy, University of Chicago

By paying close attention to slaveholders’ methods of keeping accounts, Caitlin Rosenthal shows how and why they tried to reduce human beings to marks on a ledger. Anyone concerned with the sometimes dark history of management, data, and modern accounting practices needs to read this brilliant, carefully argued book.—W. Caleb McDaniel, Rice University