GLOBAL EQUITY INITIATIVE, HARVARD UNIVERSITY
Cover: Financing Health in Latin America, Volume 1: Household Spending and Impoverishment, from Harvard University PressCover: Financing Health in Latin America, Volume 1: Household Spending and Impoverishment in PAPERBACK

Financing Health in Latin America, Volume 1: Household Spending and Impoverishment

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$24.95 • £19.95 • €22.50

ISBN 9780982914427

Publication: February 2013

Text

304 pages

6 x 9 inches

38 line illustrations; 85 tables

Global Equity Initiative, Harvard University > Global Health and Equity > Financing Health in Latin America

World, subsidiary rights restricted

Health and Human Rights Journal (HHR), a collaboration between the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights and Harvard University Press, is an open access, online-only publication dedicated to scholarship and practice that advance health as an issue of human rights and social justice. Visit HHR »

Among the most serious challenges facing health systems in lower and middle income countries is establishing efficient, fair, and sustainable financing mechanisms that offer universal protection. Lack of financial protection forces families to suffer the burden not only of illness but also of economic ruin and impoverishment. In Latin America, financial protection for health continues to be segmented and fragmented; health is mainly financed through out-of-pocket payments.

Financing Health in Latin America presents new and important insight into the crucial issue of financial protection in health systems. The book analyzes the level and determinants of catastrophic health expenditures among households in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, and Peru, applying both descriptive and econometric analyses. The results demonstrate that out-of-pocket health spending is pushing large segments of the population into impoverishment and that the poorest and most vulnerable segments of the population are most at risk of financial catastrophe. This work is a product of the collaboration between more than 25 researchers and 18 institutions associated with the Research for Health Financing in Latin America and the Caribbean Network, with support from the International Development Research Centre of Canada.