The Joanna Jackson Goldman Memorial Lectures on American Civilization and Government

The Goldman Memorial Lecture series is made possible by a gift from the estate of the late Eric F. Goldman, to honor the memory of his wife. Each year an individual is selected on the basis of his or her high achievement and literary skill to deliver a lecture at the Library on a significant issue facing American democracy. The series is intended to foster consideration of American culture and customs, economic and social issues, international relations, government and public policy.

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

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Cover: Temptations of a Superpower

Temptations of a Superpower

Steel, Ronald

One of our most eloquent and incisive foreign policy analysts offers a devastating critique of a high-stakes game of foreign policy played by rules that no longer apply, and then proposes a more realistic—and pragmatic—view of the world and our place in it.

Cover: The One and the Many: America’s Struggle for the Common Good

The One and the Many: America’s Struggle for the Common Good

Marty, Martin E.

A world-renowned authority on religion and ethics in America, Martin Marty here gives a judicious account of how the body politic has been torn between the imperative of one people, one voice, and the separate urgings of distinct identities--racial, ethnic, religious, gendered, ideological, economic.

Cover: What the People Know: Freedom and the Press

What the People Know: Freedom and the Press

Reeves, Richard

The power and status of the press in America reached new heights after spectacular reporting triumphs in the segregated South, in Vietnam, and in Washington during the Watergate years. Then new technologies created instantaneous global reporting, which left the government unable to control the flow of information to the nation. The press thus became a formidable rival in critical struggles to control what the people know and when they know it. But that was more power than the press could handle--and journalism crashed toward new lows in public esteem and public purpose.

Cover: Surprise, Security, and the American Experience

Surprise, Security, and the American Experience

Gaddis, John Lewis

September 11, 2001, Gaddis argues, was not the first time a surprise attack shattered American assumptions about national security and reshaped American grand strategy. We’ve been there before, and have responded each time by dramatically expanding our security responsibilities. How successful our current strategies will be in the face of twenty-first-century challenges is the question that now confronts us. This provocative book is one of the first attempts by a major scholar of international relations to provide an answer.

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