Carl Newell Jackson Lectures

The Department of Classics at Harvard University conducts a public lectureship in memory of Carl Newell Jackson (’98). The Jackson lectures are delivered annually by a scholar on a classical subject. They are subsequently published in the Harvard Studies in Classical Philology.

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

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Cover: Ancient Mystery Cults

Ancient Mystery Cults

Burkert, Walter

The foremost historian of Greek religion providers the first comprehensive, comparative study of a little-known aspect of ancient religious beliefs and practices.

Cover: The Making of Late Antiquity

The Making of Late Antiquity

Brown, Peter

Peter Brown presents a masterly history of Roman society in the second, third, and fourth centuries. Brown interprets the changes in social patterns and religious thought, breaking away from conventional modern images of the period.

Cover: The Development of Greek Biography: Expanded Edition

The Development of Greek Biography: Expanded Edition

Momigliano, Arnaldo

Arnaldo Momigliano traces the growth of ancient biography from the fifth century to the first century B.C. He asks new questions about the origins and development of Greek biography, and makes full use of new evidence uncovered in recent decades from papyri and other sources.

Cover: The Roman Near East: 31 BC–AD 337

The Roman Near East: 31 BC–AD 337

Millar, Fergus

From Augustus to Constantine, the Roman Empire in the Near East expanded step by step, southward to the Red Sea and eastward across the Euphrates to the Tigris. In a remarkable work of interpretive history, Fergus Millar shows us this world as it was forged into the Roman provinces of Judea, Arabia, Mesopotamia, and Syria. His book conveys the magnificent sweep of history as well as the rich diversity of peoples, religions, and languages that intermingle in the Roman Near East.

Cover: Verse with Prose from Petronius to Dante: The Art and Scope of the Mixed Form

Verse with Prose from Petronius to Dante: The Art and Scope of the Mixed Form

Dronke, Peter

Peter Dronke illuminates a unique literary tradition: the narrative that mixes prose with verse. Highlighting a wide range of texts, he defines and explores the creative ways in which mixed forms were used in Europe from antiquity through the thirteenth century.

Cover: “I have always loved the Holy Tongue”: Isaac Casaubon, the Jews, and a Forgotten Chapter in Renaissance Scholarship

“I have always loved the Holy Tongue”: Isaac Casaubon, the Jews, and a Forgotten Chapter in Renaissance Scholarship

Grafton, Anthony
Weinberg, Joanna

Fusing high scholarship with high drama, Anthony Grafton and Joanna Weinberg uncover a secret and extraordinary aspect of a legendary Renaissance scholar’s already celebrated achievement. The French Protestant Isaac Casaubon (1559–1614) is known to us through his pedantic namesake in George Eliot’s Middlemarch. But in this book, the real Casaubon emerges as a genuine literary hero, an intrepid explorer in the world of books. With a flair for storytelling reminiscent of Umberto Eco, Grafton and Weinberg follow Casaubon as he unearths the lost continent of Hebrew learning—and adds this ancient lore to the well-known Renaissance revival of Latin and Greek.

Cover: Ethics After Aristotle

Ethics After Aristotle

Inwood, Brad

The earliest philosophers thought deeply about ethical questions, but Aristotle founded ethics as a well-defined discipline. Brad Inwood focuses on the reception of Aristotelian ethical thought in the Hellenistic and Roman worlds and explores the thinker’s influence on the philosophers who followed in his footsteps from 300 BCE to 200 CE.

13.Cover: The Empire That Would Not Die: The Paradox of Eastern Roman Survival, 640–740

The Empire That Would Not Die: The Paradox of Eastern Roman Survival, 640–740

Haldon, John

The eastern Roman Empire was the largest state in western Eurasia in the sixth century. A century later, it was a fraction of its former size. Ravaged by warfare and disease, the empire seemed destined to collapse. Yet it did not die. John Haldon elucidates the factors that allowed the empire to survive against all odds into the eighth century.

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Capitalism and Its Discontents [picture of the ruins of a house]