The Nathan I. Huggins Lectures

The Nathan I. Huggins Lectures were established by friends and colleagues of Nathan I. Huggins, the distinguished historian and first occupant of the W.E.B. Du Bois Professorship at Harvard University. Professor Huggins served as Chair of the Department of African and African American Studies and as Director of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research (now the W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research) until his untimely death in 1989. The purpose of this series is to bring distinguished scholars from this country or from abroad to deliver a series of three lectures focusing on topics related to African American history.

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

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Cover: The Problem of Race in the Twenty-first Century

The Problem of Race in the Twenty-first Century

Holt, Thomas C.

“The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color-line,” W. E. B. Du Bois wrote in 1903, and his words have proven sadly prophetic. As we enter the twenty-first century, the problem remains—and yet it, and the line that defines it, have shifted in subtle but significant ways. This brief book speaks powerfully to the question of how the circumstances of race and racism have changed in our time—and how these changes will affect our future.

Cover: The Miner's Canary: Enlisting Race, Resisting Power, Transforming Democracy

The Miner's Canary: Enlisting Race, Resisting Power, Transforming Democracy

Guinier, Lani
Torres, Gerald

Like the canaries that alerted miners to a poisonous atmosphere, issues of race point to underlying problems in society that ultimately affect everyone, not just minorities. Addressing these issues is essential. Ignoring racial differences—race blindness—has failed. Focusing on individual achievement has diverted us from tackling pervasive inequalities. Now, in a powerful and challenging book, Lani Guinier and Gerald Torres propose a radical new way to confront race in the twenty-first century.

Cover: No Coward Soldiers: Black Cultural Politics in Postwar America

No Coward Soldiers: Black Cultural Politics in Postwar America

Martin, Waldo E.

In a vibrant and passionate exploration of the twentieth-century civil rights and black power eras in American history, Martin uses cultural politics as a lens through which to understand the African-American freedom struggle. In the transformative postwar period, the intersection between culture and politics became increasingly central to the African-American fight for equality. In freedom songs, in the exuberance of an Aretha Franklin concert, in Faith Ringgold’s exploration of race and sexuality, the personal and social became the political.

Cover: Challenging the Boundaries of Slavery

Challenging the Boundaries of Slavery

Davis, David Brion

Challenging the boundaries of slavery ultimately brought on the Civil War and the unexpected, immediate emancipation of slaves long before it could have been achieved in any other way. This imaginative and fascinating book puts slavery into a brilliant new light and underscores anew the desperate human tragedy lying at the very heart of the American story.

Cover: The Forgotten Fifth: African Americans in the Age of Revolution

The Forgotten Fifth: African Americans in the Age of Revolution

Nash, Gary B.

As the United States gained independence, a full fifth of the country’s population was African American. The experiences of these men and women have been largely ignored in the accounts of the colonies’ glorious quest for freedom. In this compact volume, Gary B. Nash reorients our understanding of early America, and reveals the perilous choices of the founding fathers that shaped the nation’s future. The Forgotten Fifth is a powerful story of the nation’s multiple, and painful, paths to freedom.

Cover: The Political Worlds of Slavery and Freedom

The Political Worlds of Slavery and Freedom

Hahn, Steven

Pulitzer Prize–winner Steven Hahn’s provocative new book challenges deep-rooted views in the writing of American and African-American history. Moving from slave emancipations of the eighteenth century through slave activity during the Civil War and on to the black power movements of the twentieth century, he asks us to rethink African-American history and politics in bolder, more dynamic terms. Throughout, Hahn presents African Americans as central actors in the arenas of American politics, while emphasizing traditions of self-determination, self-governance, and self-defense.

Cover: How Free Is Free?: The Long Death of Jim Crow

How Free Is Free?: The Long Death of Jim Crow

Litwack, Leon F.

Despite two major efforts to reconstruct race relations, injustices remain. From the height of Jim Crow to the early twenty-first century, struggles over racism persist despite court decisions and legislation. Although a painful history to confront, Leon F. Litwack’s book inspires as it probes the enduring story of racial inequality and the ongoing fight for freedom in black America.

Cover: Blurring the Color Line: The New Chance for a More Integrated America

Blurring the Color Line: The New Chance for a More Integrated America

Alba, Richard

Richard Alba argues that the social cleavages that separate Americans into distinct, unequal ethno-racial groups could narrow dramatically in the coming decades. In Blurring the Color Line, Alba explores a future in which socially mobile minorities could blur stark boundaries and gain much more control over the social expression of racial differences.

Cover: Quest for Equality: The Failed Promise of Black-Brown Solidarity

Quest for Equality: The Failed Promise of Black-Brown Solidarity

Foley, Neil

Neil Foley examines the complex interplay among regional, national, and international politics that plagued the efforts of Mexican Americans and African Americans to find common ground in ending employment discrimination in the defense industries and school segregation in the war years and beyond.

Cover: <i>Near Andersonville</i>: Winslow Homer’s Civil War

Near Andersonville: Winslow Homer’s Civil War

Wood, Peter H.

Peter Wood reveals the long-hidden story of a remarkable Winslow Homer Civil War painting. Wood’s brisk narrative integrates art and history, giving us a fresh vantage point on Homer’s early career, the struggle to end slavery, and the dramatic closing years of the American Civil War.

Cover: Africa Speaks, America Answers: Modern Jazz in Revolutionary Times

Africa Speaks, America Answers: Modern Jazz in Revolutionary Times

Kelley, Robin D. G.

This collective biography of four jazz musicians from Brooklyn, Ghana, and South Africa demonstrates how modern Africa reshaped jazz, how modern jazz helped form a new African identity, and how musical convergences and crossings altered the politics and culture of both continents.

Cover: Emancipating Lincoln: The Proclamation in Text, Context, and Memory

Emancipating Lincoln: The Proclamation in Text, Context, and Memory

Holzer, Harold

The Emancipation Proclamation is responsible both for Lincoln’s being hailed as the Great Emancipator and for his being pilloried by those who consider his once-radical effort at emancipation insufficient. Holzer examines the impact of Lincoln’s announcement at the moment of its creation, and then as its meaning has changed over time.

Cover: Black Jews in Africa and the Americas

Black Jews in Africa and the Americas

Parfitt, Tudor

Parfitt explains how many African peoples came to think of themselves as descendants of the ancient tribes of Israel. Pursuing medieval and modern race narratives over a millennium in which Jews were cast as black and black Africans were cast as Jews, he reveals a complex interaction between religious and racial labels and their political uses.

Cover: The Long Emancipation: The Demise of Slavery in the United States

The Long Emancipation: The Demise of Slavery in the United States

Berlin, Ira

Ira Berlin offers a framework for understanding slavery’s demise in the United States. Emancipation was not an occasion but a century-long process of brutal struggle by generations of African Americans who were not naive about the price of freedom. Just as slavery was initiated and maintained by violence, undoing slavery also required violence.

Cover: Redeeming the Great Emancipator

Redeeming the Great Emancipator

Guelzo, Allen C.

Abraham Lincoln projects a larger-than-life image across American history owing to his role as the Great Emancipator. Yet this noble aspect of Lincoln’s identity is the dimension that some historians have cast into doubt. The award-winning historian and Lincoln scholar Allen Guelzo offers a vigorous defense of America’s sixteenth president.

19.Cover: Afro-Latin America: Black Lives, 1600–2000

Afro-Latin America: Black Lives, 1600–2000

Andrews, George Reid

Two-thirds of Africans, both free and enslaved, who came to the Americas from 1500 to 1870 came to Spanish America and Brazil. Yet Afro-Latin Americans have been excluded from narratives of their hemisphere’s history. George Reid Andrews redresses this omission by making visible the lives and labors of black Latin Americans in the New World.

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