Hellenic Studies Series

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

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1.Cover: Plato's Rhapsody and Homer's Music: The Poetics of the Panathenaic Festival in Classical Athens

Plato's Rhapsody and Homer's Music: The Poetics of the Panathenaic Festival in Classical Athens

Nagy, Gregory

This book examines the overall testimony of Plato as an expert about the cultural legacy of these Homeric performances. Plato’s fine ear for language—in this case the technical language of high-class artisans like rhapsodes—picks up on a variety of authentic expressions that echo the talk of rhapsodes as they once practiced their art.

2.Cover: Labored in Papyrus Leaves: Perspectives on an Epigram Collection Attributed to Posidippus (P. Mil. Vogl. VIII 309)

Labored in Papyrus Leaves: Perspectives on an Epigram Collection Attributed to Posidippus (P. Mil. Vogl. VIII 309)

Acosta-Hughes, Benjamin
Kosmetatou, Elizabeth
Baumbach, Manuel

This colloquium volume celebrates a new Hellenistic epigram collection attributed to the third-century B.C.E. poet Posidippus, one of the most significant literary finds in recent memory. Included in this collection are an unusual variety of voices and perspectives: papyrological, art historical, archaeological, historical, literary, and aesthetic.

3.Cover: Greek Ritual Poetics

Greek Ritual Poetics

Yatromanolakis, Dimitrios
Roilos, Panagiotis

Investigating ritual in Greece from cross-disciplinary and transhistorical perspectives, this book offers novel readings of the pivotal role of ritual in Greek traditions by exploring a broad spectrum of texts, art, and social practices. This collection of essays written by an international group of leading scholars in a number of disciplines presents a variety of methodological approaches to secular and religious rituals, and to the narrative and conceptual strategies of their reenactment and manipulation in literary, pictorial, and social discourses.

4.Cover: Helots and Their Masters in Laconia and Messenia: Histories, Ideologies, Structures

Helots and Their Masters in Laconia and Messenia: Histories, Ideologies, Structures

Luraghi, Nino
Alcock, Susan

The Helots fulfilled all the functions that slaves carried out elsewhere in the Greek world, allowing their masters the leisure to be full-time warriors. Yet, despite their crucial role, Helots remain essentially invisible in our ancient sources and peripheral and enigmatic in modern scholarship. This book is devoted to a much-needed reassessment of Helotry and of its place in the history and sociology of unfree labor.

5.Cover: Priene: Second Edition

Priene: Second Edition

Dontas, Nikos A.
Ferla, Kleopatra

Priene provides the researcher with an unusually clear and complete picture of life in an ancient Greek city of the late Classical and Hellenistic period. This study presents for the first time a comprehensive look at the architecture of the city, combining material from both the first excavation of 1894 and more recent work at the site. It is lavishly illustrated with specially redrawn architectural plans and reconstructions.

7.Cover: Master of the Game: Competition and Performance in Greek Poetry

Master of the Game: Competition and Performance in Greek Poetry

Collins, Derek

The interest in the performance of ancient Greek poetry has grown dramatically in recent years. But the competitive dimension of Greek poetic performances, while usually assumed, has rarely been directly addressed. This study provides for the first time an in-depth examination of a central mode of Greek poetic competition—capping, which occurs when speakers or singers respond to one another in small numbers of verses, single verses, or between verse units themselves.

9.Cover: Black Doves Speak: Herodotus and the Languages of Barbarians

Black Doves Speak: Herodotus and the Languages of Barbarians

Munson, Rosaria

In Greek thought, barbaroi are utterers of unintelligible or inarticulate sounds. What importance does the text of Herodotus’s Histories attribute to language as a criterion of ethnic identity? The answer to this question illuminates the empirical foundations of Herodotus’s pluralistic worldview.

10.Cover: Amphoteroglossia: A Poetics of the Twelfth-Century Medieval Greek Novel

Amphoteroglossia: A Poetics of the Twelfth-Century Medieval Greek Novel

Roilos, Panagiotis

This work offers the first systematic and interdisciplinary study of the poetics of the twelfth-century medieval Greek novel. Rollos investigates the complex ways in which rhetorical theory and practice constructed the overarching cultural aesthetics that conditioned the production and reception of the genre of the novel in Byzantine society.

11.Cover: Victim of The Muses: Poet as Scapegoat, Warrior and Hero in Greco-Roman and Indo-European Myth and History

Victim of The Muses: Poet as Scapegoat, Warrior and Hero in Greco-Roman and Indo-European Myth and History

Compton, Todd Merlin

This book probes the narratives of poets who are exiled, tried or executed for their satire. It views the scapegoat as a group’s dominant warrior, sent out to confront predators or besieging forces. Both poets and warriors specialize in madness and aggression and are necessary, yet dangerous, to society.

12.Cover: Pointing at the Past: From Formula to Performance in Homeric Poetics

Pointing at the Past: From Formula to Performance in Homeric Poetics

Bakker, Egbert J.

With numerous fresh linguistic observations, Egbert Bakker shows that the epic narrator makes the epic past come to the present: epic is not only a verbal artifact that points to the past; it also is a performer’s act of pointing at a past that has become present in and through language. Building on his earlier work, Bakker demonstrates the power of discourse analysis as an essential tool for elucidating the poetics of the Homeric tradition.

13.Cover: The <i>Life and Miracles</i> of Thekla: A Literary Study

The Life and Miracles of Thekla: A Literary Study

Johnson, Scott Fitzgerald

The Life and Miracles of Thekla offers a unique view on the reception of classical and early Christian literature in Late Antiquity. This study examines the Life and Miracles as an intricate example of Greek writing and attempts to situate the work amidst a wealth of similar literary forms from the classical world.

14.Cover: Homeric Conversation

Homeric Conversation

Beck, Deborah

Homeric Conversation is the first full-length study of conversation in the Homeric poems. Deborah Beck argues that conversation should be considered a traditional Homeric type scene, alongside recognized types such as arrival, sacrifice, battle, and hospitality. This book is a wide-ranging, closely argued aesthetic analysis of repetition and variation in the Homeric epics.

15.Cover: The Culture of Kitharoidia

The Culture of Kitharoidia

Power, Timothy

The Culture of Kitharoidia is the first study dedicated exclusively to the art, practice, and charismatic persona of the citharode. Traversing a wide range of discourse and imagery about kitharôidia—poetic and prose texts, iconography, inscriptions—the book offers a nuanced account of the aesthetic and sociocultural complexities of citharodic song and examines the iconic role of the songmakers in the popular imagination.

16.Cover: The Power of Thetis and Selected Essays

The Power of Thetis and Selected Essays

Slatkin, Laura M.

Laura Slatkin’s influential and widely admired book explores the superficially minor role of Thetis in the Iliad. Slatkin uncovers alternative traditions about the power of Thetis and shows how an awareness of those myths brings a far greater understanding of Thetis’s place in the thematic structure of the Iliad. This second edition also includes six additional essays, which cover a broad range of topics in the study of the Greek Epic.

17.Cover: Comparative Anthropology of Ancient Greece

Comparative Anthropology of Ancient Greece

Detienne, Marcel

Comparative Anthropology of Ancient Greece looks at the anthropology of the Greeks and other cultures across space and time, and in the process discovers aspects of the art of comparability. Marcel Detienne tries to see how cultural systems react not just to a touchstone category, but also to the questions and concepts that arise from the reaction.

18.Cover: Poetic and Performative Memory in Ancient Greece: Heroic Reference and Ritual Gestures in Time and Space

Poetic and Performative Memory in Ancient Greece: Heroic Reference and Ritual Gestures in Time and Space

Calame, Claude

The Ancient Greeks not only spoke of time unfolding in a specific space, but also projected the past upon the future in order to make it active in the social practice of the present. Poetic and Performative Memory in Ancient Greece shows how the Ancient Greeks’ collective memory was based on a remarkable faculty for the creation of ritual and narrative symbols.

19.Cover: Weaving Truth: Essays on Language and the Female in Greek Thought

Weaving Truth: Essays on Language and the Female in Greek Thought

Bergren, Ann

"What if truth were a woman?" asked Nietzsche. In ancient Greek thought, truth in language has a special relation to the female by virtue of her pre-eminent art-form--the one Freud believed was even invented by women--weaving. The essays in this book explore the implications of this nexus: language, the female, weaving, and the construction of truth.

20.Cover: Ritual and Performativity: The Chorus in Old Comedy

Ritual and Performativity: The Chorus in Old Comedy

Bierl, Anton
Hollmann, Alexander

In this groundbreaking study, Anton Bierl uses recent approaches in literary and cultural studies to investigate the chorus of Old Comedy. After an extensive theoretical introduction that also serves as a general introduction to the dramatic chorus from the comic vantage point, a close reading of Aristophanes’s Thesmophoriazusae shows that ritual is indeed present in both the micro- and macrostructure of Attic comedy, not as a fossilized remnant of the origins of the genre but as part of a still existing performative choral culture.

21.Cover: The Epic City: Urbanism, Utopia, and the Garden in Ancient Greece and Rome

The Epic City: Urbanism, Utopia, and the Garden in Ancient Greece and Rome

Giesecke, Annette L.

As Greek and Trojan forces battled in the shadow of Troy’s wall, Hephaistos created a wondrous, ornately decorated shield for Achilles. Viewed as Homer’s blueprint for an ideal, or utopian, social order, the Shield reveals that restraining and taming Nature would be fundamental to the Hellenic urban quest. It is this ideal that Classical Athens, with her utilitarian view of Nature, exemplified. This new ideal, vividly expressed through the domestication of Nature in villas and gardens and also through primitivist and Epicurean tendencies in Latin literature, informed the urban endeavors of Rome.

22.Cover: Plato's <i>Symposium</i>: Issues in Interpretation and Reception

Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception

Lesher, James H.
Nails, Debra
Sheffield, Frisbee

In his Symposium, Plato crafted a set of speeches in praise of love that has influenced writers and artists from antiquity to the present. Early Christian writers read the dialogue’s “ascent passage” as a vision of the soul’s journey to heaven. The dialogue’s view of love is still of enormous philosophical interest in its own right. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the meaning of specific features, the significance of the dialogue as a whole, and the character of its influence. This volume brings together an international team of scholars to address such questions.

23.Cover: Paradise Earned: The Bacchic-Orphic Gold Lamellae of Crete

Paradise Earned: The Bacchic-Orphic Gold Lamellae of Crete

Tzifopoulos, Yannis

This is a study of the twelve small gold lamellae from Crete that were tokens for entrance into a golden afterlife. The lamellae are placed within the context of a small corpus of similar texts, and published with extensive commentary on their topography, lettering and engraving, dialect and orthography, meter, chronology, and usage. This work adduces parallels to the texts on the lamellae from the Byzantine period and modern Greece to illuminate the everlasting and persistent human quest for “earning Paradise.”

24.Cover: Concordia Discors: Eros and Dialogue in Classical Athenian Literature

Concordia Discors: Eros and Dialogue in Classical Athenian Literature

Scholtz, Andrew

Writing to a friend, Horace describes him as fascinated by “the discordant harmony of the cosmos, its purpose and power.” Andrew Scholtz takes this notion of “discordant harmony” and argues for it as an aesthetic principle where classical Athenian literature addresses politics in the idiom of sexual desire. Drawing on theorists of the sociality of language, his approach is an untried one for this kind of topic.

25.Cover: King of Sacrifice: Ritual and Royal Authority in the Iliad

King of Sacrifice: Ritual and Royal Authority in the Iliad

Hitch, Sarah

Descriptions of animal sacrifice in Homer offer us some of the most detailed accounts of this attempt at communication between man and gods. This book explores the structural and thematic importance of animal sacrifice as an expression of the quarrel between Akhilleus and Agamemnon through the differing perspectives of the primary narrative and character speech.

27.Cover: The Canon: The Original One Hundred and Fifty-Four Poems

The Canon: The Original One Hundred and Fifty-Four Poems

Cavafy, Constantine
Haviaras, Stratis

This volume of 154 poems by Constantine Cavafy is the entire body of work by the artist widely considered a master of modern Greek poetry. Published here in the original Greek, with a new English translation by the noted poet Stratis Haviaris on each facing page, and with a foreword by Seamus Heaney, The Canon is Cavafy, familiar and fresh, seen through new eyes, yet instantly recognized.

28.Cover: Sappho in the Making: The Early Reception

Sappho in the Making: The Early Reception

Yatromanolakis, Dimitrios

This book offers the first interdisciplinary and in-depth study of the cultural practices and ideological paradigms that conditioned the politics of the “reading” of Sappho’s songs in the early and most pivotal stages of her reception. Dimitrios Yatromanolakis investigates visual representations and ancient texts in their synchronic and diachronic multilayeredness to trace the discursive nexuses that defined the making of “Sappho” in the late archaic, classical, and early Hellenistic periods.

29.Cover: The Oral Palimpsest: Exploring Intertextuality in the Homeric Epics

The Oral Palimpsest: Exploring Intertextuality in the Homeric Epics

Tsagalis, Christos

Oral intertextuality is an innate feature of the web of myth, whose interrelated fabrics allow the audience of epic songs access to an entire horizon of story variations. The Oral Palimpsest argues that just as the discarded text of a palimpsest still carries traces of its previous writing, so the Homeric tradition unfolds its awareness of alternate versions as it reveals signs of their erasure.

30.Cover: Practitioners of the Divine: Greek Priests and Religious Officials from Homer to Heliodorus

Practitioners of the Divine: Greek Priests and Religious Officials from Homer to Heliodorus

Dignas, Beate
Trampedach, Kai

“What is a Greek priest?” The volume, which has its origins in a symposium held at the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, D.C., focuses on the question through a variety of lenses: the visual representation of cult personnel, priests as ritual experts, variations of priesthood, ideal concepts and their transformation, and the role of manteis.

31.Cover: Zeus in the <i>Odyssey</i>

Zeus in the Odyssey

Marks, J.

This book makes the case that the plot of the Odyssey is represented within the narrative as a plan of Zeus, Dios boulê, that serves as a guide for the performing poet and as a hermeneutic for the audience. The “Zeus-centric” reading proposed here offers fresh perspectives on the tenor of interactions among the Odyssey’s characters.

32.Cover: The Politics of Ethnicity and the Crisis of the Peloponnesian League

The Politics of Ethnicity and the Crisis of the Peloponnesian League

Funke, Peter
Luraghi, Nino

The crisis of Spartan power in the first half of the fourth century has been connected to Spartan inability to manage the hegemony built on the ruins of the Athenian Empire. The present book offers a new perspective, suggesting that the crisis that finally brought down Sparta was in important ways a result of centrifugal impulses within the Peloponnesian League.

33.Cover: Genos Dikanikon: Amateur and Professional Speech in the Courtrooms of Classical Athens

Genos Dikanikon: Amateur and Professional Speech in the Courtrooms of Classical Athens

Bers, Victor

Under the Athenian democracy, litigants were expected to speak for themselves, though they could memorize a speech written for them. These amateur performances often manifested an unmanly yielding to emotions of anger or fear; professional speech, Bers seeks to demonstrate, was to a large degree crafted in reaction to amateur stumbling.

35.Cover: Recapturing a Homeric Legacy: Images and Insights from the Venetus A Manuscript of the Iliad

Recapturing a Homeric Legacy: Images and Insights from the Venetus A Manuscript of the Iliad

Dué, Casey

Marcianus Graecus Z. 454 [= 822], known to Homeric scholars as the Venetus A, is the oldest complete text of the Iliad in existence, meticulously crafted during the tenth century CE. Two thousand years later, technology offers a new opportunity to rediscover this scholarship and better understand the epic that is the foundation of Western literature.

36.Cover: Homer the Classic

Homer the Classic

Nagy, Gregory

Homer the Classic is about the reception of Homeric poetry from the fifth through the first century BCE. The aim of this book, which centers on ancient concepts of Homer as the author of a body of poetry that we know as the Iliad and the Odyssey, is not to reassess the oral poetic heritage of Homeric poetry but to show how it became a classic in the days of the Athenian empire and later. This volume is one of two books stemming from six Sather Classical Lectures given in the spring semester of 2002 at the University of California at Berkeley while the author was teaching there as the Sather Professor.

37.Cover: Hippota Nestor

Hippota Nestor

Frame, Douglas

This book is about the Homeric figure Nestor. This study is important because it reveals a level of deliberate irony in the Homeric poems that has hitherto not been suspected, and because Nestor’s role in the poems, which is built on this irony, is a key to the circumstances of the poems’ composition. Interpreted in the context of the Indo-European twin myth, Nestor’s role clearly points beyond itself to the key question in Homeric studies: the circumstances of the poems’ composition.

38.Cover: The New Sappho on Old Age: Textual and Philosophical Issues

The New Sappho on Old Age: Textual and Philosophical Issues

Greene, Ellen
Skinner, Marilyn

The world has long wished for more of Sappho’s poetry, which exists mostly in tantalizing fragments. This volume is the first collection of essays in English devoted to discussion of a newly recovered Sappho poem and two other incomplete texts on the same papyri. Using different approaches, the contributions demonstrate how the “New Sappho” can be appreciated as a complete, gracefully spare poetic statement regarding the painful inevitability of death and aging.

39.Cover: <i>Iliad</i> 10 and the Poetics of Ambush: A Multitext Edition with Essays and Commentary

Iliad 10 and the Poetics of Ambush: A Multitext Edition with Essays and Commentary

Dué, Casey
Ebbott, Mary

This edition, commentary, and accompanying essays focus on the tenth book of the Iliad, which has been doubted, ignored, and even scorned. Casey Dué and Mary Ebbott use approaches based on oral traditional poetics to illuminate many of the interpretive questions that strictly literary approaches find unsolvable. The commentary demonstrates how the unconventional Iliad 10 shares in the oral traditional nature of the whole epic, even though its poetics are specific to its nocturnal ambush plot.

40.Cover: Pindar's Verbal Art: An Ethnographic Study of Epinician Style

Pindar's Verbal Art: An Ethnographic Study of Epinician Style

Wells, James Bradley

In Pindar’s Verbal Art, James Bradley Wells argues that the victory song is a traditional art form that appealed to a popular audience and served exclusive elite interests through the inclusive appeal of entertainment, popular instruction, and laughter. Wells offers a new take on recurrent Pindaric questions: genre, the unity of the victory song, tradition, and, principally, epinician performance.

41.Cover: A Californian Hymn to Homer

A Californian Hymn to Homer

Pepper, Timothy

Much as an ancient hymnist carries a familiar subject into new directions of song, the contributors to A Californian Hymn to Homer draw upon Homeric scholarship as inspiration for pursuing new ways of looking at texts, both within the Homeric tradition and outside it. This set of seven original essays, accompanied by a new translation of the Homeric “Hymn to Apollo,” considers topics that transcend traditional generic distinctions between epic and lyric, choral and individual, performed and literary.

42.Cover: Tragedy, Authority, and Trickery: The Poetics of Embedded Letters in Josephus

Tragedy, Authority, and Trickery: The Poetics of Embedded Letters in Josephus

Olson, Ryan S.

Arguing for the importance of the first-century historian Josephus to the study of classical and Hellenistic literature, Tragedy, Authority, and Trickery investigates letters in Josephus’s texts. Ryan S. Olson breaks new ground by analyzing classical, Hellenistic, and Jewish texts’ use of letters, comparing those texts to Josephus’s narratives, a virtual archive containing hundreds of letters. An external voice similar to speeches, embedded letters raise questions of authority, drive and color dramatic scenes, and function at textual and meta-textual levels to deceive their readers.

43.Cover: Multitextuality in the Homeric <i>Iliad</i>: The Witness of Ptolemaic Papyri

Multitextuality in the Homeric Iliad: The Witness of Ptolemaic Papyri

Bird, Graeme D.

Graeme D. Bird examines a small group of early papyrus manuscripts of Homer’s Iliad, known as the Ptolemaic papyri, which, although fragmentary, are the oldest surviving physical evidence of the text of the Iliad, dating from the third to the first centuries BCE. These papyri have been described as “eccentric” or even “wild.” This book analyzes their unusual readings and shows that in fact they present authentic variations on the Homeric text, based on the variability characteristic of oral performance.

44.Cover: Plato's Counterfeit Sophists

Plato's Counterfeit Sophists

Tell, Hakan

This book explores the place of the sophists within the Greek wisdom tradition, and argues against their almost universal exclusion from serious intellectual traditions. By studying the sophists against the backdrop of the archaic Greek institutions of wisdom, it is possible to detect considerable intellectual overlap between them and their predecessors. This book explores the continuity of this tradition, suggesting that the sophists’ intellectual balkanization in modern scholarship, particularly their low standing in comparison to the Presocratics, Platonists, and Aristotelians, is a direct result of Plato’s condemnation of them and their practices. This book thus seeks to offer a revised history of the development of Greek philosophy, as well as of the potential—yet never realized—courses it might have followed.

45.Cover: Kleos in a Minor Key: The Homeric Education of a Little Prince

Kleos in a Minor Key: The Homeric Education of a Little Prince

Petropoulos, J. C. B.

The word kleos in the Iliad and the Odyssey alike refers to something more substantive and complex than “fame” or “glory.” Kleos distinctly supposes an oral narrative—principally an “oral history,” a “life story” or ultimately an “oral tradition.” This book is a meditation on this concept as expressed and experienced in the adult society Telemachos find himself in. Kleos is the yardstick by which his psychological change was appreciated by Homer’s audiences.

46.Cover: Eve of the Festival: Making Myth in <i>Odyssey</i> 19

Eve of the Festival: Making Myth in Odyssey 19

Levaniouk, Olga

Eve of the Festival is a study of Homeric myth-making in the first and longest dialogue of Penelope and Odysseus (Odyssey 19). This study makes a case for seeing virtuoso myth-making as an essential part of this conversation, a register of communication important for the interaction between the two speakers.

47.Cover: The Epic Rhapsode and His Craft: Homeric Performance in a Diachronic Perspective

The Epic Rhapsode and His Craft: Homeric Performance in a Diachronic Perspective

Gonzalez, Jose

The Epic Rhapsode and His Craft studies Homeric performance from archaic to Roman imperial times. It argues that oracular utterance, dramatic acting, and rhetorical delivery powerfully elucidate the practice of epic rhapsodes. Attention to the ways in which these performance domains informed each other over time reveals a shifting dynamic of competition and emulation among rhapsodes, actors, and orators that shaped their texts and their crafts. Rhapsodic practice is best understood as an evolving combination of revelation, interpretation, recitation, and dramatic delivery.

48.Cover: The Master of Signs: Signs and the Interpretation of Signs in Herodotus' <i>Histories</i>

The Master of Signs: Signs and the Interpretation of Signs in Herodotus' Histories

Hollmann, Alexander

Readers of Herodotus’s histories are familiar with its reports of bizarre portents, riddling oracles, and striking dreams. But Herodotus draws our attention to other types of signs too, beginning with human speech itself as a coded system that can manipulate and be manipulated. Objects, gifts, artifacts, markings, even the human body, are all capable of being invested with meaning in the Histories and Herodotus shows that conventionally and culturally determined actions, gestures, and ritual all need decoding. This book represents an unprecedented examination of signs and their interpreters, as well as the terminology Herodotus uses to describe sign transmission, reception, and decoding. Through his control and involvement in this process he emerges as a veritable “master of signs.”

49.Cover: Christianity and Hellenism in the Fifth-Century Greek East: Theodoret's Apologetics against the Greeks in Context

Christianity and Hellenism in the Fifth-Century Greek East: Theodoret's Apologetics against the Greeks in Context

Papadogiannakis, Yannis

This book—the first full-length study of Theodoret’s Therapeutic for Hellenic Maladies—examines Theodoret’s arguments against Greek religion, philosophy, and culture. Its analysis of the interaction between Hellenism and early Christian culture offers insights into the broader late Roman and early Byzantine world in the fifth century.

50.Cover: Homer's Versicolored Fabric: The Evocative Power of Ancient Greek Epic Word-Making

Homer's Versicolored Fabric: The Evocative Power of Ancient Greek Epic Word-Making

Bonifazi, Anna

Anna Bonifazi examines the evocative power of linguistic elements in the Homeric text—in particular, the use of αύ- adverbs and particles to signal upcoming content and the ambiguous use of pronouns to evoke the complexity of Odysseus’s identity. She shows that, by deliberately merging distinct meanings, the text incorporates different viewpoints.

52.Cover: Aspects of History and Epic in Ancient Iran: From Gaumāta to Wahnām

Aspects of History and Epic in Ancient Iran: From Gaumāta to Wahnām

Shayegan, M. Rahim

One of the Ancient Near East’s most important inscriptions is the Bisotun inscription of the Achaemenid king Darius I (6th century B.C.E.), which reports on a suspicious fratricide and coup. Shayegan shows how the Bisotun’s narrative influenced the Iranian epic, epigraphic, and historiographical traditions into the Sasanian and early Islamic periods.

53.Cover: From Listeners to Viewers: Space in the <i>Iliad</i>

From Listeners to Viewers: Space in the Iliad

Tsagalis, Christos

Exploring the functions of space in the Iliad, Christos Tsagalis shows how active spatial representation in similes and descriptive passages influences characterization and narrative action. He also analyzes Homeric modes of visual memory, implicit knowledge, and mnemonic formats in order to better understand descriptive and ekphrastic passages.

54.Cover: The Theory and Practice of Life: Isocrates and the Philosophers

The Theory and Practice of Life: Isocrates and the Philosophers

Wareh, Tarik

Tarik Wareh’s study of the literary culture within which the works, schools, and careers of Plato, Aristotle, and other Greek intellectuals took shape focuses on the role played by their rival Isocrates and the rhetorical education offered in his school. The book sheds new light on the participation of “Isocrateans” in fourth-century intellectual life.

55.Cover: Loving Humanity, Learning, and Being Honored: The Foundations of Leadership in Xenophon's <i>Education of Cyrus</i>

Loving Humanity, Learning, and Being Honored: The Foundations of Leadership in Xenophon's Education of Cyrus

Sandridge, Norman B.

In this new interpretation of the Education of Cyrus, in which Xenophon theorized about leadership, Sandridge considers Xenophon’s portrait of Cyrus as sincerely laudatory though not idealized. He explores the wider context in which Xenophon’s Theory of Leadership was conceived, as well as the problems of leadership he sought to address.

56.Cover: Imperial Geographies in Byzantine and Ottoman Space

Imperial Geographies in Byzantine and Ottoman Space

Bazzaz, Sahar
Batsaki, Yota
Angelov, Dimiter

Focusing on the the eastern Mediterranean area shaped by the Byzantine and Ottoman empires, this volume explores the nexus of empire and geography. Through examination of a wide variety of texts, the essays explore ways in which production of geographical knowledge supported imperial authority or revealed its precarious grasp of geography.

57.Cover: Paideia and Cult: Christian Initiation in Theodore of Mopsuestia

Paideia and Cult: Christian Initiation in Theodore of Mopsuestia

Schwartz, Daniel L.

Schwartz’s analysis of the Catechetical Homilies of Theodore of Mopsuestia explores the role of education and worship in the complex process of conversion and Christianization. Catechesis emerges here as invaluable for comprehending clergy’s ability to initiate new members as Christianity gained increasing prominence within the late Roman world.

58.Cover: Homeric Durability: Telling Time in the <i>Iliad</i>

Homeric Durability: Telling Time in the Iliad

Garcia, Lorenzo F.

Homeric Durability investigates the concepts of time and decay in the Iliad. Through a framework informed by phenomenology and psychology, Lorenzo F. Garcia, Jr. argues that, in moments of pain and sorrow, the Homeric gods are themselves defined by human temporal experience, and so the epic tradition cannot but imagine its own eventual disintegration.

59.Cover: The Theology of Arithmetic: Number Symbolism in Platonism and Early Christianity

The Theology of Arithmetic: Number Symbolism in Platonism and Early Christianity

Kalvesmaki, Joel

In the second century, some Gnostic Christians used numerical structures to describe God, interpret the Bible, and frame the universe. The Theology of Arithmetic explores the rich variety of number symbolism used by gnosticizing groups and their orthodox critics, and shows how earlier neo-Pythagorean and Platonist thought influenced this theology.

60.Cover: Eusebius of Caesarea: Tradition and Innovations

Eusebius of Caesarea: Tradition and Innovations

Johnson, Aaron
Schott, Jeremy

One of the most significant contributors to late antique literary culture, Eusebius of Caesarea has received only limited attention as a writer and thinker in his own right. Focusing on the full range of Eusebius’s works, the new studies in Eusebius of Caesarea will change how classicists, theologians, and historians think about this major figure.

61.Cover: The Web of Athenaeus

The Web of Athenaeus

Jacob, Christian
Papaconstantinou, Arietta
Johnson, Scott Fitzgerald

Christian Jacob presents a completely fresh and unique reading of Athenaeus’s Sophists at Dinner (ca. 200 CE), a text long mined merely for its testimonies to lost classical poets. Connecting the world of Hellenistic erudition with its legacy among Hellenized Romans, Jacob helps the reader navigate the many intersecting paths in this enormous work.

62.Cover: Divine Yet Human Epics: Reflections of Poetic Rulers from Ancient Greece and India

Divine Yet Human Epics: Reflections of Poetic Rulers from Ancient Greece and India

Pathak, Shubha

Shubha Pathak explores a new way to connect the primary Sanskrit epics Rāmāyana and Mahābhārata with their Greek analogues, the Iliad and Odyssey. This cross-cultural comparative study provides a more comprehensive perspective on the poems’ religiosity than the vantage points of Hellenists or of Indologists alone.

63.Cover: Poetry as Initiation: The Center for Hellenic Studies Symposium on the Derveni Papyrus

Poetry as Initiation: The Center for Hellenic Studies Symposium on the Derveni Papyrus

Papadopoulou, Ioanna
Muellner, Leonard

The Derveni Papyrus, discovered accidentally in 1962, is the oldest known European “book.” Papers in Poetry as Initiation address many open questions about the papyrus, including its authorship, the context of the peculiar chthonic ritual described in the text, and the relationship of the author and the ritual to the so-called Orphic texts.

64.Cover: Between Thucydides and Polybius: The Golden Age of Greek Historiography

Between Thucydides and Polybius: The Golden Age of Greek Historiography

Parmeggiani, Giovanni

Between Thucydides and Polybius focuses on the contribution of fourth-century authors such as Ephorus, Theopompus, and Xenophon to the development of Greek historiography. Essays examine the interface between historiography and rhetoric, while undermining the claim that historians after Thucydides allowed rhetoric to prevail over research.

65.Cover: Dialoguing in Late Antiquity

Dialoguing in Late Antiquity

Cameron, Averil

Averil Cameron refutes an argument by some scholars that Christians did not dialogue after a wall of silence came down in the fifth century AD. Cameron shows that in late antiquity and throughout Byzantium Christians debated and wrote philosophical, literary, and theological dialogues, and she makes a case for their centrality in Greek literature.

66.Cover: Plato's Wayward Path: Literary Form and the <i>Republic </i>

Plato's Wayward Path: Literary Form and the Republic

Schur, David

Scholars of the literary aspect of Plato try to reconcile his dialogue form with the expository imperative of philosophical argument. Classicists and philosophers explain this form in terms of rhetorical devices serving didactic goals. David Schur brings literary and classical studies into debate, questioning modern views of Plato’s dialogue form.

67.Cover: Plato’s Four Muses: The <i>Phaedrus</i> and the Poetics of Philosophy

Plato’s Four Muses: The Phaedrus and the Poetics of Philosophy

Capra, Andrea

Andrea Capra reconstructs Plato’s authorial self-portrait through a fresh reading of the Phaedrus. Capra maintains that Socrates’s conversion to “demotic” music in the Phaedo closely parallels the Phaedrus and is apologetic in character, since Socrates was held responsible for dismissing traditional mousikê.

68.Cover: Literary History in the Parian Marble

Literary History in the Parian Marble

Rotstein, Andrea

Inscribed after 264 BCE, the Parian Marble gives a chronological list of events, emphasizing literary matters. It has not been the subject of a comprehensive study for almost a century. Andrea Rotstein offers new analysis and updated information about the inscription, including a revision of Felix Jacoby’s Greek text and a complete translation.

69.Cover: The Theban Epics

The Theban Epics

Davies, Malcolm

Malcolm Davies provides the first full commentary on the surviving fragments of the four epics that recount the story of the Seven’s failed assault against Thebes and the successful assault in the next generation. He sets them in context and examines whether artistic depictions of the relevant myths can help reconstruct the lost epics’ contents.

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Capitalism and Its Discontents [picture of the ruins of a house]