Harvard Series in Islamic Law

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

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1.Cover: Jewish and Islamic Law: A Comparative Study of Custom during the Geonic Period

Jewish and Islamic Law: A Comparative Study of Custom during the Geonic Period

Libson, Gideon

Gideon Libson’s highly original work on custom is the first attempt to present a comprehensive comparative study of Jewish–Islamic law on a particular topic during the early Middle Ages. His in-depth study of Islamic law—its sources, legal schools, and extensive legal literature—together with his expertise in the wide range of geonic and rabbinic literature enable him to determine the influence of Muslim practice on geonic custom.

2.Cover: The Islamic School of Law: Evolution, Devolution, and Progress

The Islamic School of Law: Evolution, Devolution, and Progress

Bearman, Peri
Peters, Rudolph
Vogel, Frank E.

The Islamic school of law, or madhhab, is a concept on which a substantial amount has been written but of which there is still little understanding, and even less consensus. This collection of selected papers from the III International Conference on Islamic Legal Studies, held in May 2000 at the Harvard Law School, offers building blocks toward the entire edifice of understanding the complex development of the madhhab, a development that even in the contemporary dissolution of madhhab lines and grouping continues to fascinate.

3.Cover: The History of an Islamic School of Law: The Early Spread of Hanafism

The History of an Islamic School of Law: The Early Spread of Hanafism

Tsafrir, Nurit

So closely is the early development of the Hanafi school interwoven with non-legal spheres—the political, social, and theological—that its study is essential to a proper understanding of medieval Islamic history. Tsafrir offers a thorough examination of the first century and a half of the school’s existence, the period during which it took shape.

4.Cover: Her Day in Court: Women's Property Rights in Fifteenth-Century Granada

Her Day in Court: Women's Property Rights in Fifteenth-Century Granada

Shatzmiller, Maya

This book is a study of the historical record of the property rights and equity of Muslim women. Based on Islamic court documents of fifteenth-century Granada--documents that show a high degree of women’s involvement--the book examines women’s legal entitlements to acquire property, as well as the social and economic significance of these rights to Granada’s female population and, by extension, to women in other Islamic societies.

5.Cover: Islamic Law in Contemporary Indonesia: Ideas and Institutions

Islamic Law in Contemporary Indonesia: Ideas and Institutions

Feener, R. Michael
Cammack, Mark E.

Although often neglected in the literature on Islamic law, contemporary Indonesia is an especially rich source of insight into the Islamic legal tradition. The essays in this volume provide focused examinations of the internal dynamics of intellectual and institutional Islamic law in modern Indonesia, together offering a substantive introduction to important developments in both the theory and practice of law in the world’s most populous Muslim society.

6.Cover: The Islamic Marriage Contract: Case Studies in Islamic Family Law

The Islamic Marriage Contract: Case Studies in Islamic Family Law

Quraishi, Asifa
Vogel, Frank E.

It is often said that marriage in Islamic law is a civil contract, not a sacrament. This volume collects papers from many disciplines examining the Muslim marriage contract. Articles cover doctrines as to marriage contracts (e.g., may a wife stipulate monogamy?); historical instances; comparisons with Jewish and canon law; contemporary legal and social practice; and projects of activists for women worldwide.

7.Cover: Justice and Leadership in Early Islamic Courts

Justice and Leadership in Early Islamic Courts

Rabb, Intisar A.
Balbale, Abigail Krasner

Justice and Leadership in Early Islamic Courts explores the administration of justice during Islam’s founding period, 632–1250 CE. Inspired by the scholarship of Roy Parviz Mottahedeh, ten scholars of Islamic law draw on diverse sources including historical chronicles, biographical dictionaries, exegetical works, and mirrors for princes.

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