Harvard University Asia Center

The Harvard University Asia Center was officially established on July 1, 1997, to reflect Harvard’s deep commitment to Asia and the growing connections between Asian nations. The center is an active organization with varied programs focusing on international relations in Asia and comparative studies of Asian countries and regions. Harvard’s study of Asia is spread across the University’s departments and schools, and a wide array of disciplines come together under the auspices of the Asia Center. Through such a convergence, the Center brings a layered, multifaceted approach to the scholarly description of events to probe questions of history and culture, of economics, politics, diplomacy, and security, and the relationships among them.

The Asia Center supplements and connects other Asia-related programs and institutes and the University and provides a focal point for interaction and exchange on topics of common interest for the Harvard community and Asian intellectual, political, and business circles.

Sub-Collections

Below is a list of in-print works in this collection, presented in series order or publication order as applicable.

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Cover: In Pursuit of Status: The Making of South Korea’s “New” Urban Middle Class

In Pursuit of Status: The Making of South Korea’s “New” Urban Middle Class

Lett, Denise Potrzeba

In this ethnography of the everyday life of contemporary Korea, Denise Lett argues that South Korea’s contemporary urban middle class not only exhibits upper-class characteristics but also that this reflects a culturally inherited disposition of Koreans to seek high status. Lett shows that Koreans have adapted traditional ways of asserting high status to modern life, and analyzes strategies for claiming high status in terms of occupation, family, lifestyle, education, and marriage.

Cover: After Mao: Chinese Literature and Society, 1978–1981

After Mao: Chinese Literature and Society, 1978–1981

Kinkley, Jeffrey C.

Cover: Ai Ssu-ch’i’s Contribution to the Development of Chinese Marxism

Ai Ssu-ch’i’s Contribution to the Development of Chinese Marxism

Fogel, Joshua A.

The recent flood of reminiscence literature in China has reserved a special place of prominence for Ai Ssu-ch’i. This is not only because he was so admired by Mao, but also because he devoted his life so enthusiastically and wholeheartedly to the Party. Joshua Fogel traces the pattern of this devotion via Ai’s crucial role in spreading Marxist-Leninist thought among Chinese intellectuals.

Cover: Science and Technology in Post-Mao China

Science and Technology in Post-Mao China

Simon, Denis Fred
Goldman, Merle

Along with the political and economic reforms that have characterized the post-Mao era in China there has been a potentially revolutionary change in Chinese science and technology. Here sixteen scholars examine various facets of the current science and technology scene, comparing it with the past and speculating about future trends.

Cover: From May Fourth to June Fourth: Fiction and Film in Twentieth-Century China

From May Fourth to June Fourth: Fiction and Film in Twentieth-Century China

Widmer, Ellen
Wang, David Der-wei

What do the Chinese literature and film inspired by the Cultural Revolution (1966–1976) have in common with the Chinese literature and film of the May Fourth movement (1918–1930)? This new book demonstrates that these two periods share several aims: to liberate these narrative arts from previous aesthetic orthodoxies, to draw on foreign sources for inspiration, and to free individuals from social conformity.

Cover: Engendering China: Women, Culture, and the State

Engendering China: Women, Culture, and the State

Gilmartin, Christina K.
Hershatter, Gail
Rofel, Lisa
White, Tyrene

This first significant collection of essays on women in China in more than two decades captures a pivotal moment in a cross-cultural—and interdisciplinary—dialogue. For the first time, the voices of China-based scholars are heard alongside scholars positioned in the United States.

Cover: Zouping in Transition: The Process of Reform in Rural North China

Zouping in Transition: The Process of Reform in Rural North China

Walder, Andrew G.

Zouping offers important general lessons for the study of China’s rural transformation. The authors in this volume, all participants in a unique field research project undertaken from 1988 to 1992, address questions concerning the role of local governments as economic actors, market reform, and inequality.

Cover: The Paradox of China’s Post-Mao Reforms

The Paradox of China’s Post-Mao Reforms

Goldman, Merle
MacFarquhar, Roderick

China’s bold program of reforms launched in the late 1970s—the move to a market economy and the opening to the outside world—ended the political chaos and economic stagnation of the Cultural Revolution and sparked China’s unprecedented economic boom. Yet, while the reforms made possible a rising standard of living for the majority of China’s population, they came at the cost of a weakening central government, increasing inequalities, and fragmenting society. These essays analyze the contradictory impact of China’s economic reforms on its political system and social structure.

Cover: Changing Meanings of Citizenship in Modern China

Changing Meanings of Citizenship in Modern China

Goldman, Merle
Perry, Elizabeth J.

This collection of essays addresses the meaning and practice of political citizenship in China over the past century, raising the question of whether reform initiatives in citizenship imply movement toward increased democratization. Valuable for its century-long perspective and for placing the historical patterns of Chinese citizenship within the context of European and American experiences, Changing Meanings of Citizenship in Modern China investigates a critical issue for contemporary Chinese society.

Cover: Grassroots Political Reform in Contemporary China

Grassroots Political Reform in Contemporary China

Perry, Elizabeth J.
Goldman, Merle

Observers often note the glaring contrast between China’s economic progress and its stalled political reforms. This volume, written by experienced scholars, explores a range of grassroots efforts—initiated by the state and society alike—to restrain corrupt behavior and enhance the accountability of local authorities. While the authors offer varying views on the larger significance of these developments, their case studies point to a more dynamic Chinese political system than is often acknowledged.

Cover: Popular Protest in China

Popular Protest in China

O'Brien, Kevin J.

Unrest in China, from the dramatic events of 1989 to more recent stirrings, offers a rare opportunity to consider how popular contention unfolds in places where speech and assembly are tightly controlled. The contributors to this volume argue that ideas inspired by social movements elsewhere can help explain popular protest in China.

Cover: One Country, Two Societies: Rural-Urban Inequality in Contemporary China

One Country, Two Societies: Rural-Urban Inequality in Contemporary China

Whyte, Martin King

This timely and important collection of original essays analyzes China’s foremost social cleavage: the rural–urban gap. The contributors, many of whom conducted extensive fieldwork, examine the historical background of rural–urban relations; aspects of inequality apart from income (access to education and medical care, the digital divide, housing quality and location); experiences of discrimination, particularly among urban migrants; and conceptual and policy debates in China regarding the status and treatment of rural residents and urban migrants.

Cover: Mitsubishi and the N.Y.K., 1870–1914: Business Strategy in the Japanese Shipping Industry

Mitsubishi and the N.Y.K., 1870–1914: Business Strategy in the Japanese Shipping Industry

Wray, William D.

William Wray presents an in-depth examination of the origins and institutional growth prior to World War I of Mitsubishi, today Japan’s largest industrial group, and the Nippon Yusan Kaisha (N.Y.K.), now the world’s leading shipping enterprise. Drawing heavily upon previously inaccessible archival material from Japanese and Western companies, Wray shows how Japanese business grew out of institutional change through conflict.

Cover: Public Finance During the Korean Modernization Process

Public Finance During the Korean Modernization Process

Bahl, Roy
Kim, Chuk Kyo
Park, Chong Kee

This final volume in the series Studies in the Modernization of the Republic of Korea, 1945–1975, is an analysis of the contribution of tax and expenditure policy to Korea’s rapid economic development during the 1953–1975 period. The results of the analysis show that Korea did not follow the traditional path of a steadily increasing tax effort, reliance on direct taxes, and emphasis on income distribution. Instead, through improved tax administration and expenditure control, the savings rate was increased dramatically.

Cover: Going to the People: Chinese Intellectuals and Folk Literature, 1918–1937

Going to the People: Chinese Intellectuals and Folk Literature, 1918–1937

Hung, Chang-tai

It is generally believed that Mao Zedong’s populism was an abrupt departure from traditional Chinese thought. This study demonstrates that many of its key concepts had been developed several decades earlier by young May Fourth intellectuals, including Liu Fu, Zhou Zuoren, and Gu Jiegang. The Chinese folk-literature movement, begun at National Beijing University in 1918, changed the attitudes of Chinese intellectuals toward literature and toward the common people.

Cover: Exhausting the Earth: State and Peasant in Hunan, 1500–1850

Exhausting the Earth: State and Peasant in Hunan, 1500–1850

Perdue, Peter C.

Cover: The Country of Streams and Grottoes: Expansion, Settlement, and the Civilizing of the Sichuan Frontier in Song Times

The Country of Streams and Grottoes: Expansion, Settlement, and the Civilizing of the Sichuan Frontier in Song Times

von Glahn, Richard

Cover: A Latterday Confucian: Reminiscences of William Hung 1893-1980

A Latterday Confucian: Reminiscences of William Hung 1893-1980

Egan, Susan Chan

As a scholar, William Hung was instrumental in opening China’s rich documentary past to modern scrutiny. As an educator, he helped shape one of twentieth-century China’s most remarkable institutions, Yenching University. In 1978, he began recalling his colorful life to Susan Chan Egan in weekly taping sessions. His reminiscences encompass the issues and dilemmas faced by Chinese intellectuals of his period.

Cover: Nakae Ushikichi in China: The Mourning of Spirit

Nakae Ushikichi in China: The Mourning of Spirit

Fogel, Joshua A.

Fogel tells the strange story of this cocky, indolent carouser who became a disciplined scholar and passionate advocate of the worth of all humanity. Fogel examines Nakae’s Sinological work in the context of his wide reading in German philosophy, Western historiography, and classical Chinese sources. He also translates Nakae’s wartime diary.

Cover: The Evolution of Labor Relations in Japan: Heavy Industry, 1853-1955

The Evolution of Labor Relations in Japan: Heavy Industry, 1853-1955

Gordon, Andrew

Cover: Tales of Heichu

Tales of Heichu

Videen, Susan Downing

Cover: Vietnam and the Chinese Model: A Comparative Study of Nguyen and Ch’ing Civil Government in the First Half of the Nineteenth Century

Vietnam and the Chinese Model: A Comparative Study of Nguyen and Ch’ing Civil Government in the First Half of the Nineteenth Century

Woodside, Alexander

Here is the first real comparison of the civil governments of two traditional East Asian societies on an institution-by-institution basis. Woodside examines in detail the surviving statutes of both societies in his political and cultural study, a pioneering venture in East Asian comparative history.

Cover: Computers, Inc: Japan’s Challenge to IBM

Computers, Inc: Japan’s Challenge to IBM

Anchordoguy, Marie

This account of efforts to build a domestic Japanese computer industry is enlivened with quotations from industrial leaders commenting on the stages through which Japan has emerged as a world-class competitor.

Cover: Hideyoshi

Hideyoshi

Berry, Mary Elizabeth

Hideyoshi—peasant turned general, military genius, and imperial regent of Japan—is the subject of an immense legendary literature. He is best known for the conquest of Japan’s sixteenth-century warlords and the invasion of Korea. But his lasting contribution is as governor whose policies shaped the course of Japanese politics for almost three hundred years.

Cover: Japanese Marxist: A Portrait of Kawakami Hajime, 1879–1946

Japanese Marxist: A Portrait of Kawakami Hajime, 1879–1946

Bernstein, Gail Lee

The heir of a samurai family, an acknowledged authority on economics, a professor at one of Japan’s leading universities, an early popularizer of Marxism in Japan, a Japanese Communist on his own unique terms, and, finally, the author of an autobiography that is a classic of modern Japanese literature, Kawakami Hajime is an important figure in the history of modern Japan. Bernstein provides a portrait of Kawakami’s complex personality as well as a narrative of the context and content of Japanese left-wing politics in the 1920s.

Cover: Ideas Across Cultures: Essays on Chinese Thought in Honor of Benjamin I. Schwartz

Ideas Across Cultures: Essays on Chinese Thought in Honor of Benjamin I. Schwartz

Cohen, Paul A.
Goldman, Merle

The essays in this book are by scholars who have studied with Benjamin Schwartz. Benjamin Schwartz taught at Harvard from 1950 until his retirement in 1987. Through his teaching and writing, he became a major force in the field of Chinese studies, setting standards--above all in the area of intellectual history--that have been a source of inspiration to students and scholars worldwide. His influence extends well beyond the China field, cutting across conventional disciplinary boundaries, touching political science, religion, philosophy, and literature as well as history.

Cover: Robert Hart and China's Early Modernization: His Journals, 1863-1866

Robert Hart and China's Early Modernization: His Journals, 1863-1866

Smith, Richard J.
Fairbank, John King
Bruner, Katherine

These journal entries continue the sequence begun in Entering China’s Service and cover the years when Hart was setting up Customs procedures, establishing a modus operandi with the Ch’ing bureaucracy, and inspecting the treaty ports. They culminate in Hart’s return visit to Europe with the Pinch’un Mission and his marriage in Northern Ireland.

Cover: Politics and Policy in Traditional Korea

Politics and Policy in Traditional Korea

Palais, James B.

James B. Palais theorizes in his important book on Korea that the remarkable longevity of the Yi dynasty (1392–1910) was related to the difficulties the country experienced in adapting to the modern world. He suggests that the aristocratic and hierarchical social system, which was the source of stability of the dynasty, was also the cause of its weakness.

Cover: American Multinationals and Japan: The Political Economy of Japanese Capital Controls, 1899-1980

American Multinationals and Japan: The Political Economy of Japanese Capital Controls, 1899-1980

Mason, Mark

Drawing on rich historical materials from both sides of the Pacific, including corporate records and government documents never before made public, Mason examines the development of both Japanese policy towards foreign investment and the strategic responses of American corporations.

Cover: The Secret Window: Ideal Worlds in Tanizaki’s Fiction

The Secret Window: Ideal Worlds in Tanizaki’s Fiction

Chambers, Anthony Hood

In this series of meditations on seven of Tanizaki Jun’ichiro’s novels and novellas, the renowned translator Anthony Chambers focuses on the thread of fantasy that Tanizaki weaves throughout his work. He examines Tanizaki’s subtle use of storytelling devices to evoke his characters’ alternate sense of reality and to encourage the reader’s participation in their fantasies.

Cover: The Meiji Unification through the Lens of Ishikawa Prefecture

The Meiji Unification through the Lens of Ishikawa Prefecture

Baxter, James C.

Credit for the swift unification of Japan following the 1868 overthrow of the Tokugawa shogunate is usually given to the national leaders. In this book, James Baxter argues that brilliant leadership at the top is not sufficient to explain how regional separatist tendencies and loyalties to the old lords were overcome in the formation of a nationally unified state.

Cover: Breaking Barriers: Travel and the State in Early Modern Japan

Breaking Barriers: Travel and the State in Early Modern Japan

Vaporis, Constantine Nomikos

Constantine Vaporis challenges the notion that an elaborate and restrictive system of travel regulations in Tokugawa Japan prevented widespread travel, maintaining instead that a "culture of movement" developed in that era.

Cover: Five Mountains: The Rinzai Zen Monastic Institution in Medieval Japan

Five Mountains: The Rinzai Zen Monastic Institution in Medieval Japan

Collcutt, Martin

Cover: The Modern Epidemic: A History of Tuberculosis in Japan

The Modern Epidemic: A History of Tuberculosis in Japan

Johnston, William

Through a historical and comparative analysis of modern Japan’s epidemic of tuberculosis, William Johnston illuminates a major but relatively unexamined facet of Japanese social and cultural history.

Cover: China’s Local Councils in the Age of Constitutional Reform, 1898-1911

China’s Local Councils in the Age of Constitutional Reform, 1898-1911

Thompson, Roger

Cover: The Sound of the Whistle: Railroads and the State in Meiji Japan

The Sound of the Whistle: Railroads and the State in Meiji Japan

Ericson, Steven J.

In this detailed study of the development of the Japanese railroad industry during the Meiji period, Steven Ericson explores the economic role of government and the nature of state-business relations during Japan’s modern transformation.

Cover: Rituals of Self-Revelation: Shishōsetsu as Literary Genre and Socio-Cultural Phenomenon

Rituals of Self-Revelation: Shishōsetsu as Literary Genre and Socio-Cultural Phenomenon

Hijiya-Kirschnereit, Irmela

Irmela Hijiya-Kirschnereit brings a sophisticated and graceful method of analysis to this English translation of her book on the shishōsetsu, one of the most important yet misunderstood genres in Japanese literature.

Cover: Muslim Chinese: Ethnic Nationalism in the People's Republic, Second Edition

Muslim Chinese: Ethnic Nationalism in the People's Republic, Second Edition

Gladney, Dru C.

This second edition of Dru Gladney’s critically acclaimed study of the Muslim population in China includes a new preface by the author, as well as a valuable addendum to the bibliography, already hailed as one of the most extensive listing of modern sources on the Sino-Muslims.

Cover: Kenmu: Go–Daigo's Revolution

Kenmu: Go–Daigo's Revolution

Goble, Andrew Edmund

The short-lived Kenmu regime (1333–1336) of Japanese Emperor Go-Daigo is often seen as an inevitably doomed, revanchist attempt to shore up the old aristocratic order. But far from resisting change, Andrew Edmund Goble here forcefully argues, the flamboyant Go-Daigo and his associates sought to overcome the old order and renegotiate its structure and ethos.

Cover: Hiraizumi: Buddhist Art and Regional Politics in Twelfth-Century Japan

Hiraizumi: Buddhist Art and Regional Politics in Twelfth-Century Japan

Yiengpruksawan, Mimi Hall

In the twelfth century, along the borders of the Japanese state in northern Honshu, three generations of local rulers built a capital city at Hiraizumi that became a major military and commercial center. Known as the Hiraizumi Fujiwara, these rulers created a city filled with art, in an attempt to use the power of art and architecture to claim a religious and political mandate. In the first book-length study of Hiraizumi in English, the author studies the rise of the Hiraizumi Fujiwara and analyzes their remarkable construction program.

Cover: War and National Reinvention: Japan in the Great War, 1914-1919

War and National Reinvention: Japan in the Great War, 1914-1919

Dickinson, Frederick R.

This study links two sets of concerns—the focus of recent studies of the nation on language, culture, education, and race; and the emphasis of diplomatic history on international developments—to show how political, diplomatic, and cultural concerns work together to shape national identity.

Cover: Colonial Industrialization and Labor in Korea: The Onoda Cement Factory

Colonial Industrialization and Labor in Korea: The Onoda Cement Factory

Park, Soon-Won

This book is a study of labor relations and the first generation of skilled workers in colonial Korea, a subject crucial to the understanding of modernization in twentieth-century Korea. Born in rural Korea, these workers confronted both the colonial experience and the modern workplace as they interacted with Japanese managers and workers. Based on the archives of the Onoda Cement Factory and interviews with surviving workers, this work analyzes the complex relationship between colonialism and modernization.

Cover: Japan's Protoindustrial Elite: The Economic Foundations of the Gono

Japan's Protoindustrial Elite: The Economic Foundations of the Gono

Pratt, Edward E.

Through a close examination of economic trends and case studies of particular families, this study demonstrates that Japan’s protoindustrial economy was far more volatile than portrayed in most studies to date. Few rural elites survived the competitive and unstable climate of this era. Onerous exactions, interregional competition, market volatility, and succession problems propelled many wealthy families into steep decline and others into drastic shifts in the focus of their businesses.

Cover: Riding the Black Ship: Japan and Tokyo Disneyland

Riding the Black Ship: Japan and Tokyo Disneyland

Raz, Aviad E.

Since it opened in 1983, Tokyo Disneyland has been analyzed mainly as an example of the globalization of the American leisure industry and its organizational culture, particularly the "company manual." By looking at how Tokyo Disneyland is experienced by employees, management, and visitors, Aviad Raz shows that rather than being an agent of Americanization, Tokyo Disneyland is a simulated "America" showcased by and for the Japanese. It is an "America" with a Japanese meaning.

Cover: Recontextualizing Texts: Narrative Performance in Modern Japanese Fiction

Recontextualizing Texts: Narrative Performance in Modern Japanese Fiction

Sakaki, Atsuko

Offering the first systematic examination of five modern Japanese fictional narratives, all of them available in English translations, Atsuko Sakaki explores Natsume Sōseki’s Kokoro and The Three-Cornered World; Ibuse Masuji’s Black Rain; Mori Ōgai’s Wild Geese; and Tanizaki Jun’ichirō’s Quicksand.

Cover: Shredding the Tapestry of Meaning: The Poetry and Poetics of Kitasono Katue (1902-1978)

Shredding the Tapestry of Meaning: The Poetry and Poetics of Kitasono Katue (1902-1978)

Solt, John

Kitasono Katue was a leading avant-garde literary figure, first in Japan and then throughout the world, from the 1920s to the 1970s. In his long career, Kitasono was instrumental in creating Japanese-language work influenced by futurism, dadaism, and surrealism before World War II and in contributing a Japanese voice to the international avant-garde movement after the war. This critical biography of Kitasono examines the life, poetry, and poetics of this controversial and flamboyant figure.

Cover: Japanese Cultural Policy toward China, 1918-1931: A Comparative Perspective

Japanese Cultural Policy toward China, 1918-1931: A Comparative Perspective

Teow, See Heng

Most existing scholarship on Japan’s cultural policy toward modern China reflects the paradigm of cultural imperialism. In contrast, this study demonstrates that Japan was mindful of Chinese opinion and sought the cooperation of the Chinese government. China, however, was not a passive recipient and actively sought to redirect this policy to serve its national interests and aspirations. The author argues that it is time to move away from the framework of cultural imperialism toward one that recognizes the importance of cultural autonomy, internationalism, and transculturation.

Cover: Zhou Zuoren and an Alternative Chinese Response to Modernity

Zhou Zuoren and an Alternative Chinese Response to Modernity

Daruvala, Susan

This book explores the issues of nation and modernity in China by focusing on the work of Zhou Zuoren (1885-1967), one of the most controversial of modern Chinese intellectuals and brother of the writer Lu Xun. Zhou was radically at odds with many of his contemporaries and opposed their nation-building and modernization projects. Through his literary and aesthetic practice as an essayist, Zhou espoused a way of constructing the individual and affirming the individual’s importance in opposition to the normative national subject of most May Fourth reformers.

Cover: Prayer and Play in Late Tokugawa Japan: Asakusa Sensōji and Edo Society

Prayer and Play in Late Tokugawa Japan: Asakusa Sensōji and Edo Society

Hur, Nam-lin

The unique amalgam of prayer and play at the Sensōji temple in Edo is often cited as proof of the “degenerate Buddhism” of the Tokugawa period. This investigation of the economy and cultural politics of Sensōji, however, shows that its culture of prayer and play reflected changes taking place in Tokugawa Japan, particularly in the city of Edo. Hur’s reappraisal of prayer and play and their inherent connectedness provides a cultural critique of conventional scholarship on Tokugawa religion and shows how Edo commoners incorporated cultural politics into their daily lives through the pursuit of prayer and play.

Cover: Becoming Apart: National Power and Local Politics in Toyama, 1868–1945

Becoming Apart: National Power and Local Politics in Toyama, 1868–1945

Lewis, Michael

Focusing on the marginal region of Toyama, on the Sea of Japan, the author explores the interplay of central and regional authorities, local and national perceptions of rights, and the emerging political practices in Toyama and Tokyo that became part of the new political culture that took shape in Japan following the Meiji Restoration. Lewis argues that in response to the demands of the centralizing state, local elites and leaders in Toyama developed a repertoire of supple responses that varied with the political or economic issue at stake.

Cover: Jewel in the Ashes: Buddha Relics and Power in Early Medieval Japan

Jewel in the Ashes: Buddha Relics and Power in Early Medieval Japan

Ruppert, Brian D.

Focusing on the ninth to the fourteenth centuries, this study analyzes the ways in which relics functioned as material media for the interactions of Buddhist clerics, the imperial family, lay aristocrats, and warrior society and explores the multivocality of relics by dealing with specific historical examples. Brian Ruppert argues that relics offered means for reinforcing or subverting hierarchical relations.

Cover: Minamata: Pollution and the Struggle for Democracy in Postwar Japan

Minamata: Pollution and the Struggle for Democracy in Postwar Japan

George, Timothy S.

Nearly forty years after the outbreak of the “Minamata Disease,” it remains one of the most horrific examples of environmental poisoning. Based on primary documents and interviews, this book describes three rounds of responses to this incidence of mercury poisoning, focusing on the efforts of its victims and their supporters, particularly the activities of grassroots movements and popular campaigns, to secure redress.

Cover: State and Economy in Republican China: A Handbook for Scholars

State and Economy in Republican China: A Handbook for Scholars

Kirby, William C.
Lin, Man-houng
Shih, James Chin

This manual for students focuses on archival research in the economic and business history of the Republican era (1911–1949). Following a general discussion of archival research and research aids for the Republican period, the handbook introduces the collections of archives in the People’s Republic of China and the Republic of China on Taiwan that contain materials in the areas of economics and business, with data on the history of the archives, descriptions of their holdings, and publications on their collections.

Cover: The Making of Japanese Manchuria, 1904-1932

The Making of Japanese Manchuria, 1904-1932

Matsusaka, Yoshihisa Tak

In this history of Japanese involvement in northeast China, the author argues that Japan’s military seizure of Manchuria in September 1931 was founded on three decades of infiltration of the area. This incremental empire-building and its effect on Japan are the focuses of this book.

Cover: A Time of Crisis: Japan, the Great Depression, and Rural Revitalization

A Time of Crisis: Japan, the Great Depression, and Rural Revitalization

Smith, Kerry

This study of Japan’s transformation by the economic crises of the 1930s focuses on efforts to overcome the effects of the Great Depression in rural areas, particularly the activities of local activists and policymakers in Tokyo. The reactions of inhabitants of rural areas to the depression shed new light on how average Japanese responded to the problems of modernization and how they re-created the countryside.

Cover: Competing Discourses: Orthodoxy, Authenticity, and Engendered Meanings in Late Imperial Chinese Fiction

Competing Discourses: Orthodoxy, Authenticity, and Engendered Meanings in Late Imperial Chinese Fiction

Epstein, Maram

In the traditional Chinese symbolic vocabulary, the construction of gender was never far from debates about ritual propriety, desire, and even cosmic harmony. Competing Discourses maps the aesthetic and semantic meanings associated with gender in the Ming–Qing vernacular novel through close readings of five long narratives.

Cover: Desire and Fictional Narrative in Late Imperial China

Desire and Fictional Narrative in Late Imperial China

Huang, Martin W.

In this new study of desire in Late Imperial China, Martin Huang argues that the development of traditional Chinese fiction as a narrative genre was closely related to changes in conceptions of the fundamental nature of desire.

Cover: Unfinished Business: Ayukawa Yoshisuke and U.S.-Japan Relations, 1937-1953

Unfinished Business: Ayukawa Yoshisuke and U.S.-Japan Relations, 1937-1953

Iguchi, Haruo

Ayukawa Yoshisuke (1880–1967) was the founder of the Nissan conglomerate and the leader of the Manchuria Industrial Development Corporation, one of the linchpins of Imperial Japan’s efforts to economically exploit its overseas dependencies. He was also a proponent of free trade and global economic interdependence. In Unfinished Business, through exploring the reasons for Ayukawa’s failure, Iguchi illuminates many of the economic problems of today’s Japan.

Cover: Writing Margins: The Textual Construction of Gender in Heian and Kamakura Japan

Writing Margins: The Textual Construction of Gender in Heian and Kamakura Japan

Kawashima, Terry

In texts from the mid-Heian to the early Kamakura periods, certain figures appear to be “marginal” or removed from “centers” of power. But why do we see these figures in this way? This study first seeks to answer this question by examining the details of the marginalizing discourse found in these texts.

Cover: Re-examining the Cold War: U.S.–China Diplomacy, 1954–1973

Re-examining the Cold War: U.S.–China Diplomacy, 1954–1973

Ross, Robert S.
Jiang, Changbin

The twelve essays in this volume underscore the similarities between Chinese and American approaches to bilateral diplomacy and between their perceptions of each other’s policy-making motivations.

Cover: The Foochow Missionaries, 1847-1880

The Foochow Missionaries, 1847-1880

Carlson, Ellsworth C.

This detailed study investigates the early decades of Protestant missionary work in one of the important provincial capitals of China.

Cover: Economic Planning and Organization in Mainland China: A Documentary Study, 1949-1957

Economic Planning and Organization in Mainland China: A Documentary Study, 1949-1957

Chao, Kuo-chun

Cover: Financial Development in Korea, 1945-1978

Financial Development in Korea, 1945-1978

Cole, David C.
Park, Yung Chul

Cover: A Bibliography of Studies and Translations of Modern Chinese Literature, 1918-1942

A Bibliography of Studies and Translations of Modern Chinese Literature, 1918-1942

Gibbs, Donald
Li, Yun-chen

Cover: Japanese Studies of Modern China since 1953: A Bibliographical Guide to Historical and Social-Science Research on the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

Japanese Studies of Modern China since 1953: A Bibliographical Guide to Historical and Social-Science Research on the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

Kamachi, Noriko
Fairbank, John King
Ichiko, Chuzo

Cover: Growth and Structural Transformation

Growth and Structural Transformation

Kim, Kwang Suk
Roemer, Michael

Cover: China's Silk Trade: Traditional Industry in the Modern World, 1842-1937

China's Silk Trade: Traditional Industry in the Modern World, 1842-1937

Li, Lillian M.

Cover: The Tsungli Yamen: Its Organization and Functions

The Tsungli Yamen: Its Organization and Functions

Meng, S. M.

Cover: Bureaucratic Reform in Provincial China: Ting Jih-ch'ang in Restoration Kiangsu

Bureaucratic Reform in Provincial China: Ting Jih-ch'ang in Restoration Kiangsu

Ocko, Jonathan K.

Cover: A Critical Guide to the Kwangtung Provincial Archives

A Critical Guide to the Kwangtung Provincial Archives

Pong, David

Cover: The Home Base of American China Missions, 1880–1920

The Home Base of American China Missions, 1880–1920

Rabe, Valentin H.

Valentin Rabe focuses on the recruitment of personnel, fundraising, administration, promotional propaganda, and other logistical problems faced by the agencies in the United States. When generalizations concerning the American base require demonstration or references to the field of operations, China—the country in which American missionaries applied the greatest proportion of the movement’s resources by the 1920s—is used as the primary illustration.

Cover: The Missionary Mind and American East Asia Policy, 1911-1915

The Missionary Mind and American East Asia Policy, 1911-1915

Reed, James

Cover: Rural Industrialization in China

Rural Industrialization in China

Sigurdson, John

Small-scale industries in rural areas in China are today an essential element of regional development programs. This monograph analyzes two main development strategies. One involves technology choices in a number of industrial sectors, most of which were initiated during the Great Leap Forward in the late fifties. The other approach is the integrated rural development strategy where a number of activities are integrated within or closely related to the commune system.

Cover: Utilitarian Confucianism: Ch'en Liang's Challenge to Chu Hsi

Utilitarian Confucianism: Ch'en Liang's Challenge to Chu Hsi

Tillman, Hoyt Cleveland

Cover: Lao She and the Chinese Revolution

Lao She and the Chinese Revolution

Vohra, Ranbir

By exhaustively analyzing Lao She’s literary writings, Vohra traces the development of his political consciousness and convictions. Besides being an introduction to the life and works of Lao She, this book contributes to a greater understanding of the nature of the social and political change in twentieth-century China.

Cover: Japan’s Local Pragmatists: The Transition from Bakumatsu to Meiji in the Kawasaki Region

Japan’s Local Pragmatists: The Transition from Bakumatsu to Meiji in the Kawasaki Region

Waters, Neil L.

Cover: The Russian Ecclesiastical Mission in Peking During the Eighteenth Century

The Russian Ecclesiastical Mission in Peking During the Eighteenth Century

Widmer, Eric

Cover: Landlord and Labor in Late Imperial China: Case Studies from Shandong

Landlord and Labor in Late Imperial China: Case Studies from Shandong

Wilkinson, Endymion

This well-documented study discusses the social and economic changes in Shandong province before the influence of the West was felt at the end of the nineteenth century. The authors show that by the sixteenth century, commercial and handicraft towns linked to national and local markets had already begun to emerge. Case studies of managerial landlords, who form the main focus of this study, are included as well as generalizations drawn from questionnaire materials.

Cover: The Appropriation of Cultural Capital: China's May Fourth Project

The Appropriation of Cultural Capital: China's May Fourth Project

Doleželová-Velingerová, Milena
Král, Oldřich
Sanders, Graham

For much of the twentieth century, the May Fourth movement of 1919 was seen as the foundational moment of modernity in China. Recent examinations of literary and cultural modernity in China have, however, led to a questioning of this view. By approaching May Fourth from novel perspectives, the authors of the eight studies in this volume seek to contribute to the ongoing critique of the movement.

Cover: The People's Emperor: Democracy and the Japanese Monarchy, 1945-1995

The People's Emperor: Democracy and the Japanese Monarchy, 1945-1995

Ruoff, Kenneth J.

Few institutions are as well suited as the monarchy to provide a window on postwar Japan. The monarchy, which is also a family, has been significant both as a political and as a cultural institution. Ruoff analyzes numerous issues, stressing the monarchy’s "postwarness" rather than its traditionality.

Cover: The Making of Shinkokinshū

The Making of Shinkokinshū

Huey, Robert N.

In the history of traditional Japanese waka poetry, Shinkokinshū of 1205 is generally regarded as one of the three most important anthologies. The collection—the “New Kokinshu”—is in many ways a neo-classical effort. Reading history backward, scholars have often taken this to be a nostalgia for greatness presumed to have been lost in the wars of the late 1100s. In this detailed study of the origins of Shinkokinshū, the author argues that the compilers of Shinkokinshū instead saw their collection as a “new” beginning, a revitalization and affirmation of courtly traditions, and not a reaction to loss. It is a dynamic collection, full of innovative, challenging poetry—not an elegy for a lost age.

Cover: Rethinking the 1898 Reform Period: Political and Cultural Change in Late Qing China

Rethinking the 1898 Reform Period: Political and Cultural Change in Late Qing China

Karl, Rebecca E.
Zarrow, Peter

The nine essays in this volume reexamine the “hundred days” in 1898 and focus particularly on the aftermath of this reform movement. Their collective goal is to rethink the reforms not as a failed attempt at modernizing China but as a period in which many of the institutions that have since structured China began.

Cover: Inklings of Democracy in China

Inklings of Democracy in China

Ogden, Suzanne

Since 1979 China’s leaders have introduced reforms that have lessened the state’s hold over the lives of ordinary citizens. By examining the growth in individual rights, the public sphere, democratic processes, and pluralization, Ogden seeks to answer questions concerning the relevance of liberal democratic ideas for China and the relationship between a democratic political culture and a democratic political system.

Cover: Emotions at Work: Normative Control, Organizations, and Culture in Japan and America

Emotions at Work: Normative Control, Organizations, and Culture in Japan and America

Raz, Aviad E.

Rather than focusing on the psychology of personal emotions at work, this study concentrates on emotions as role requirements, on workplace emotions that combine the private with the public, the personal with the social, and the authentic with the masked. In this cross-cultural study of "emotion management," the author argues that even though the goals of normative control in factories, offices, and shops may be similar across cultures, organizational structure and the surrounding culture affect how that control is discussed and conceived.

Cover: A Patterned Past: Form and Thought  in Early Chinese Historiography

A Patterned Past: Form and Thought in Early Chinese Historiography

Schaberg, David

In this comprehensive study of the rhetoric, narrative patterns, and intellectual content of the Zuozhuan and Guoyu, David Schaberg reads these two collections of historical anecdotes as traces of a historiographical practice that flourished around the fourth century BCE among the followers of Confucius.

Cover: The Golden Age of the U.S.–China–Japan Triangle,  1972–1989

The Golden Age of the U.S.–China–Japan Triangle, 1972–1989

Vogel, Ezra F.
Yuan, Ming
Tanaka, Akihiko

A collaborative effort by scholars from the United States, China, and Japan, this volume focuses on the period 1972–1989, during which all three countries, brought together by a shared geopolitical strategy, established mutual relations with one another despite differences in their histories, values, and perceptions of their own national interest. Although each initially conceived of its political and security relations with the others in bilateral terms, the three in fact came to form an economic and political triangle during the 1970s and 1980s. But this triangle is a strange one whose dynamics are constantly changing. Its corners (the three countries) and its sides (the three bilateral relationships) are unequal, while its overall nature (the capacity of the three to work together) has varied considerably as the economic and strategic positions of the three have changed and post–Cold War tensions and uncertainties have emerged.

Cover: On Sacred Grounds: Culture, Society, Politics, and the Formation of the Cult of Confucius

On Sacred Grounds: Culture, Society, Politics, and the Formation of the Cult of Confucius

Wilson, Thomas A.

The sacred landscape of imperial China was dotted with Buddhist monasteries, Daoist temples, shrines to local deities, and the altars of the mandarinate. Prominent among the official shrines were the temples in every capital throughout the empire devoted to the veneration of Confucius. Twice a year members of the educated elite and officials in each area gathered to offer sacrifices to Confucius, his disciples, and the major scholars of the Confucian tradition.

Cover: Technology of Empire: Telecommunications and Japanese Expansion in Asia, 1883-1945

Technology of Empire: Telecommunications and Japanese Expansion in Asia, 1883-1945

Yang, Daqing

In the extension of the Japanese empire in the 1930s and 1940s, technology, geo-strategy, and institutions were closely intertwined in empire building. The central argument of this study of the development of a communications network linking the far-flung parts of the Japanese imperium is that modern telecommunications not only served to connect these territories but, more important, made it possible for the Japanese to envision an integrated empire in Asia. Even as the imperial communications network served to foster integration and strengthened Japanese leadership and control, its creation and operation exacerbated long-standing tensions and created new conflicts within the government, the military, and society in general.

Cover: The Song-Yuan-Ming Transition in Chinese History

The Song-Yuan-Ming Transition in Chinese History

Smith, Paul Jakov
von Glahn, Richard

This volume seeks to study the connections between two well-studied epochs in Chinese history: the mid-imperial era of the Tang and Song (ca. 800-1270) and the late imperial era of the late Ming and Qing (1550-1900). Both eras are seen as periods of explosive change, particularly in economic activity, characterized by the emergence of new forms of social organization and a dramatic expansion in knowledge and culture. The task of establishing links between these two periods has been impeded by a lack of knowledge of the intervening Mongol Yuan dynasty (1271-1368). This historiographical "black hole" has artificially interrupted the narrative of Chinese history and bifurcated it into two distinct epochs.

Cover: Steps of Perfection: Exorcistic Performers and Chinese Religion in Twentieth-Century Taiwan

Steps of Perfection: Exorcistic Performers and Chinese Religion in Twentieth-Century Taiwan

Sutton, Donald S.

Despite Taiwan’s rise as an economic force in the world, modernity has not led to a Weberian process of disenchantment or curbed religiosity. To the contrary, other factors—social, economic, political—have stimulated religion. How and why this has happened are central issues in this book.

Cover: Fu Shan's World: The Transformation of Chinese Calligraphy in the Seventeenth Century

Fu Shan's World: The Transformation of Chinese Calligraphy in the Seventeenth Century

Bai, Qianshen

For 1,300 years, Chinese calligraphy was based on the elegant art of Wang Xizhi (A.D. 303–361). But the seventeenth-century emergence of a style modeled on the rough, broken epigraphs of ancient bronzes and stone artifacts brought a revolution in calligraphic taste. By the eighteenth century, this led to the formation of the stele school of calligraphy, which continues to shape Chinese calligraphy today. A dominant force in this school was the eminent calligrapher and art theorist Fu Shan (1607–1685). Because his work spans the late Ming–early Qing divide, it is an ideal prism through which to view the transformation in calligraphy.

Cover: Alien Kind: Foxes and Late Imperial Chinese Narrative

Alien Kind: Foxes and Late Imperial Chinese Narrative

Huntington, Rania

To discuss the supernatural in China is “to talk of foxes and speak of ghosts.” Ming and Qing China were well populated with foxes, shape-changing creatures who transgressed the boundaries of species, gender, and the metaphysical realm. In human form, foxes were both immoral succubi and good wives/good mothers, both tricksters and Confucian paragons. They were the most alien yet the most common of the strange creatures a human might encounter. Rania Huntington investigates a conception of one kind of alien and attempts to establish the boundaries of the human.

Cover: China Made: Consumer Culture and the Creation of the Nation

China Made: Consumer Culture and the Creation of the Nation

Gerth, Karl

In the early twentieth century, China began to import and then to manufacture thousands of consumer goods. These commodities changed the life of millions of Chinese, but the influx of imports and the desires they created threatened many in China. Politicians worried about trade deficits and new consumer lifestyles. Intellectuals, inspired by Western political economy, feared the loss of national sovereignty. And manufacturers wondered how they could survive the flood of inexpensive imports. This book argues that the responses of these groups to the emerging consumer culture helped define and spread modern Chinese nationalism.

Cover: The Troublesome Legacy of Commissioner Lin: The Opium Trade and Opium Suppression in Fujian Province, 1820s to 1920s

The Troublesome Legacy of Commissioner Lin: The Opium Trade and Opium Suppression in Fujian Province, 1820s to 1920s

Madancy, Joyce A.

In 1908, a very public crusade against opium was in full swing throughout China, and the provincial capital and treaty port of Fuzhou was a central stage for the campaign. This, the most successful attempt undertaken by the Chinese state before 1949 to eliminate opium, came at a time when, according to many historians, China’s central state was virtually powerless. This volume attempts to reconcile that apparent contradiction.

Cover: Transmitters and Creators: Chinese Commentators and Commentaries on the <i>Analects</i>

Transmitters and Creators: Chinese Commentators and Commentaries on the Analects

Makeham, John

The Analects (Lunyu) is one of the most influential texts in human history. As a foundational text in scriptural Confucianism, it was instrumental in shaping intellectual traditions in China and East Asia. But no premodern reader read only the text of the Analects itself. Rather, the Analects was embedded in a web of interpretation that mediated its meaning. Modern interpreters of the Analects only rarely acknowledge this legacy of two thousand years of commentaries. This book attempts to redress our neglect of commentaries by analyzing four key works dating from the late second century to the mid-nineteenth century.

Cover: House and Home in Modern Japan: Architecture, Domestic Space, and Bourgeois Culture, 1880-1930

House and Home in Modern Japan: Architecture, Domestic Space, and Bourgeois Culture, 1880-1930

Sand, Jordan

A house is a site, the bounds and focus of a community. It is also an artifact, a material extension of its occupants’ lives. This book takes the Japanese house in both senses, as site and as artifact, and explores the spaces, commodities, and conceptions of community associated with it in the modern era.

Cover: Metamorphosis of the Private Sphere: Gardens and Objects in Tang-Song Poetry

Metamorphosis of the Private Sphere: Gardens and Objects in Tang-Song Poetry

Yang, Xiaoshan

This book deals with the poetic configurations of the private garden in cities from the ninth to the eleventh century in relation to the development of the private sphere in Chinese literati culture. It focuses on the ways in which the new values and rhetoric associated with gardens and the objects found in them helped shape the processes of self-cultivation and self-imaging among the literati, as they searched for alternatives to conventional values at a time when traditional political, moral, and aesthetic norms were increasingly judged inapplicable or inadequate.

Cover: The Red Brush: Writing Women of Imperial China

The Red Brush: Writing Women of Imperial China

Idema, Wilt L.
Grant, Beata

One of the most exciting recent developments in the study of Chinese literature has been the rediscovery of an extremely rich and diverse tradition of women’s writing of the imperial period. This anthology differs from previous works by offering a glimpse of women’s writings not only in poetry but in other genres as well, including essays and letters, drama, religious writing, and narrative fiction.

Cover: From Cotton Mill to Business Empire: The Emergence of Regional Enterprises in Modern China

From Cotton Mill to Business Empire: The Emergence of Regional Enterprises in Modern China

Köll, Elisabeth

The concepts, definitions, and interpretations of property rights, corporate structures, and business practices in contemporary China have historical, institutional, and cultural roots. In tracing the development under founder Zhang Jian (1853–1926) and his successors of the Dasheng Cotton Mill in Nantong, the author documents the growth of regional enterprises as local business empires from the 1890s until the foundation of the People’s Republic in 1949.

Cover: Localizing Paradise: Kumano Pilgrimage and the Religious Landscape of Premodern Japan

Localizing Paradise: Kumano Pilgrimage and the Religious Landscape of Premodern Japan

Moerman, D. Max

Although located far from the populated centers of traditional Japan, the three Kumano shrines occupied a central position in the Japanese religious landscape. This book encompasses both the historical and the ideological Kumano—not only a stage for the performance of asceticism and pilgrimage, but also a place of the imagination, a topic of literary and artistic representation. By studying Kumano’s particular religious landscape, we can better understand the larger, common religious landscape of premodern Japan.

Cover: Burning and Building: Schooling and State Formation in Japan, 1750-1890

Burning and Building: Schooling and State Formation in Japan, 1750-1890

Platt, Brian

Among the earliest and most radical of the Meiji reforms was a plan for a centralized, compulsory educational system modeled after those in Europe and America. But commoners throughout Japan had established 50,000 schools with almost no guidance or support from the government. Consequently, the plan met with resistance, as local officials, teachers, and citizens pursued alternative educational visions. Their efforts ultimately led to the growth and consolidation of a new educational system, one with the imprint of local demands and expectations.

Cover: The Ethos of Noh: Actors and Their Art

The Ethos of Noh: Actors and Their Art

Rath, Eric C.

This book explores how memories of the past become traditions, and the role of these traditions in the institutional development of the noh theater from its beginnings in the fourteenth century through the late twentieth century. It focuses on the development of the key traditions that constitute the "ethos of noh," the ideology that empowered certain groups of actors at the expense of others, and how this ethos fostered noh’s professionalization. The author argues that the traditions that form the ethos of noh, such as those surrounding masks and manuscripts, are the key traits that define it as an art.

Cover: Building Local States: China during the Republican and Post-Mao Eras

Building Local States: China during the Republican and Post-Mao Eras

Remick, Elizabeth

This book examines two eras of Chinese history that have commonly been viewed as periods of state disintegration or retreat. And they were--at the central level. When re-examined at the local level, however, both are revealed as periods of state building. In both the Nanjing decade of Guomindang rule (1927-1937) and the early post-Mao reform era (1980-1992), both national and local factors shaped local state building and created variations in local state structures and practices.

Cover: Taiwan’s Imagined Geography: Chinese Colonial Travel Writing and Pictures, 1683–1895

Taiwan’s Imagined Geography: Chinese Colonial Travel Writing and Pictures, 1683–1895

Teng, Emma Jinhua

Until 300 years ago, the Chinese considered Taiwan a “land beyond the seas,” a “ball of mud” inhabited by “naked and tattooed savages.” The incorporation of this island into the Qing empire in the seventeenth century and its evolution into a province by the late nineteenth century involved not only a reconsideration of imperial geography but also a reconceptualization of the Chinese domain. By viewing Taiwan–China relations as a product of the history of Qing expansionism, the author contributes to our understanding of current political events in the region.

Cover: Opium and the Limits of Empire: Drug Prohibition in the Chinese Interior, 1729–1850

Opium and the Limits of Empire: Drug Prohibition in the Chinese Interior, 1729–1850

Bello, David Anthony

This book examines the Chinese opium crisis from the perspective of Qing prohibition efforts. The author argues that opium prohibition, and not the opium wars, was genuinely imperial in scale and is hence much more representative of the actual drug problem faced by Qing administrators. The study of prohibition also permits a more comprehensive and accurate observation of the economics and criminology of opium.

Cover: Public Spheres, Private Lives in Modern Japan, 1600-1950: Essays in Honor of Albert Craig

Public Spheres, Private Lives in Modern Japan, 1600-1950: Essays in Honor of Albert Craig

Bernstein, Gail Lee
Gordon, Andrew
Nakai, Kate Wildman

The eleven chapters in this volume explore the process of carving out, in discourse and in practice, the boundaries delineating the state, the civil sphere, and the family in Japan from 1600 to 1950. One of the central themes in the volume is the demarcation of relations between the central political authorities and local communities.

Cover: Writing Home: Representations of the Native Place in Modern Japanese Literature

Writing Home: Representations of the Native Place in Modern Japanese Literature

Dodd, Stephen

This book examines the development of Japanese literature depicting the native place (furusato) from the mid-Meiji period through the late 1930s as a way of articulating the uprootedness and sense of loss many experienced as Japan modernized. The book concentrates on four authors who typify this trend: Kunikida Doppo, Shimazaki Tōson, Satō Haruo, and Shiga Naoya.

Cover: Identity Reflections: Pilgrimages to Mount Tai in Late Imperial China

Identity Reflections: Pilgrimages to Mount Tai in Late Imperial China

Dott, Brian R.

Mount Tai in northeastern China has long been a sacred site. Throughout history, it has been a magnet for both women and men from all classes—emperors, aristocrats, officials, literati, and villagers. This book examines the behavior of those who made the pilgrimage to Mount Tai and their interpretations of its sacrality and history, as a means of better understanding their identities and mentalities.

Cover: Discourses of Seduction: History, Evil, Desire, and Modern Japanese Literature

Discourses of Seduction: History, Evil, Desire, and Modern Japanese Literature

Hirata, Hosea

If the postmodernist ethical onslaught has led to the demise of literature by exposing its political agenda, if all literature is compromised by its entanglement with power, why does literature’s subterranean voice still seduce us into reading? And what is the relationship between ethics and history in the study of literature? In a series of essays on the writings of Kawabata Yasunari, Murakami Haruki, Karatani Kjin, Furui Yoshikichi, Mishima Yukio, Oe Kenzaburo, Natsume Soseki, and Kobayashi Hideo, Hosea Hirata visits the primal force of the scandalous to confront the questions raised.

Cover: Beyond Birth: Social Status in the Emergence of Modern Korea

Beyond Birth: Social Status in the Emergence of Modern Korea

Hwang, Kyung Moon

The social structure of contemporary Korea contains strong echoes of the hierarchical principles and patterns governing stratification in the Chosŏn dynasty (1392–1910): namely, birth and one’s position in the bureaucracy. As the author shows, the political disruptions of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, however, rewarded talent instead of birth. In turn, these groups’ newfound standing as part of the governing elite allowed them to break into, and often dominate, the cultural, literary, and artistic spheres as well as politics, education, and business.

Cover: Individualism and Socialism: The Life and Thought of Kawai Eijirō (1891–1944)

Individualism and Socialism: The Life and Thought of Kawai Eijirō (1891–1944)

Hirai, Atsuko

Kawai Eijirō was a controversial figure in Japan during the interwar years. Dedicated to the idea that the socialist aspiration for economic equality could be combined with a classical liberal commitment to individual political and civil rights, he antagonized both Marxists and Japanese nationalists. This is the first study of Kawai in English.

Cover: Islands of Eight Million Smiles: Idol Performance and Symbolic Production in Contemporary Japan

Islands of Eight Million Smiles: Idol Performance and Symbolic Production in Contemporary Japan

Aoyagi, Hiroshi

Since the late 1960s a ubiquitous feature of popular culture in Japan has been the "idol," an attractive young actor, male or female, packaged and promoted as an adolescent role model and exploited by the entertainment, fashion, cosmetic, and publishing industries to market trendy products. This book offers ethnographic case studies regarding the symbolic qualities of idols and how these qualities relate to the conceptualization of selfhood among adolescents in Japan and elsewhere in East Asia. Ultimately, Aoyagi argues, idol performances substantiate capitalist values in the urban consumer society of contemporary Japan and East Asia.

Cover: Trauma and Transcendence in Early Qing Literature

Trauma and Transcendence in Early Qing Literature

Idema, Wilt L.
Li, Wai-yee
Widmer, Ellen

The collapse of the Ming dynasty and the Manchu conquest of China were traumatic experiences for Chinese intellectuals, not only because of the many decades of destructive warfare but also because of the adjustments necessary to life under a foreign regime. The twelve chapters in this volume and the introductory essays on early Qing poetry, prose, and drama understand the writings of this era wholly or in part as attempts to recover from or transcend the trauma of the transition years.

Cover: The Age of Visions and Arguments: Parliamentarianism and the National Public Sphere in Early Meiji Japan

The Age of Visions and Arguments: Parliamentarianism and the National Public Sphere in Early Meiji Japan

Kim, Kyu Hyun

The Meiji Restoration of 1868 inaugurated a period of great change in Japan; it is seldom associated, however, with advances in civil and political rights. By studying parliamentarianism—the theories, arguments, and polemics marshaled in support of a representative system of government—Kim uncovers a much more complicated picture of this era than is usually given.

Cover: The Readability of the Past in Early Chinese Historiography

The Readability of the Past in Early Chinese Historiography

Li, Wai-yee

The past becomes readable when we can tell stories and make arguments about it. When we can tell more than one story or make divergent arguments, the readability of the past then becomes an issue. Therein lies the beginning of history, the sense of inquiry that heightens our awareness of interpretation. What are the possibilities and limits of historical knowledge? This book explores these issues through a study of the Zuozhuan, a foundational text in the Chinese tradition, whose rhetorical and analytical self-consciousness reveals much about the contending ways of thought unfolding during the period of the text’s formation.

Cover: Proving the Way: Conflict and Practice in the History of Japanese Nativism

Proving the Way: Conflict and Practice in the History of Japanese Nativism

McNally, Mark

Kokugaku, or nativism, was one of the most important intellectual movements from the seventeenth through the nineteenth century in Japan, and its worldview continues to be influential today. The primary goal of this book is to restore historicity to the study of nativism by recognizing Atsutane’s role in the creation and perpetuation of an intellectual tradition that remains a significant part of Japanese history and culture.

Cover: Gendering Modern Japanese History

Gendering Modern Japanese History

Molony, Barbara
Uno, Kathleen

The sixteen chapters in this volume treat men as well as women, theories of sexuality as well as gender prescriptions, and same-sex as well as heterosexual relations in the period from 1868 to the present. Together, these essays construct a history informed by the idea that gender matters because it was part of the experience of people and because it often has been a central feature in the construction of modern ideologies, discourses, and institutions. Separately, each chapter examines how Japanese have (en)gendered their ideas, institutions, and society.

Cover: Dynastic Crisis and Cultural Innovation: From the Late Ming to the Late Qing and Beyond

Dynastic Crisis and Cultural Innovation: From the Late Ming to the Late Qing and Beyond

Wang, David Der-wei
Shang, Wei

Focusing on the twin themes of crisis and innovation, the seventeen chapters in this book aim to illuminate the late Ming and late Qing as eras of literary-cultural innovation during periods of imperial disintegration; to analyze linkages between the two periods and the radical heritage they bequeathed to the modern imagination; and to rethink the “premodernity” of the late Ming and late Qing in the context of the end of the age of modernism.

Cover: An Introduction to Literary Chinese: Revised Edition

An Introduction to Literary Chinese: Revised Edition

Fuller, Michael A.

Cover: Normalization of U.S.-China Relations: An International History

Normalization of U.S.-China Relations: An International History

Kirby, William C.
Ross, Robert S.
Gong, Li

Relations between China and the United States have been of central importance to both countries over the past half-century, as well as to all states affected by that relationship. The eight chapters in this volume offer the first multinational, multi-archival review of the history of Chinese–American conflict and cooperation in the 1970s.

Cover: Practical Pursuits: Takano Choei, Takahashi Keisaku, and Western Medicine in Nineteenth-Century Japan

Practical Pursuits: Takano Choei, Takahashi Keisaku, and Western Medicine in Nineteenth-Century Japan

Nakamura, Ellen Gardner

This book argues that the study of Western medicine was a dynamic activity that brought together doctors from all over the country in efforts to effect social change. By examining the social impact of Western learning at the level of everyday life rather than simply its impact at the theoretical level, the book offers a broad picture of the way in which Western medicine, and Western knowledge, was absorbed and adapted in Japan.

Cover: The United Nations in Japan's Foreign and Security Policymaking, 1945-1992: National Security, Party Politics, and International Status

The United Nations in Japan's Foreign and Security Policymaking, 1945-1992: National Security, Party Politics, and International Status

Pan, Liang

This study focuses on postwar Japan’s foreign policy making in the political and security areas, the core UN missions. The intent is to illustrate how policy goals forged by national security concerns, domestic politics, and psychological needs gave shape to Japan’s complicated and sometimes incongruous policy toward the UN since World War II.

Cover: Localities at the Center: Native Place, Space, and Power in Late Imperial Beijing

Localities at the Center: Native Place, Space, and Power in Late Imperial Beijing

Belsky, Richard

Native-place lodges are often cited as an example of the particularistic ties that characterized traditional China and worked against the emergence of a modern state based on loyalty to the nation. The author argues that by fostering awareness of membership in an elite group, the native-place lodges generated a sense of belonging to a nation that furthered the reforms undertaken in the early twentieth century.

Cover: A History of the Early Korean Kingdom of Paekche, together with an annotated translation of <i>The Paekche Annals</i> of the <i>Samguk sagi</i>

A History of the Early Korean Kingdom of Paekche, together with an annotated translation of The Paekche Annals of the Samguk sagi

Best, Jonathan W.

This volume presents two histories of the early Korean kingdom of Paekche (trad. 18 BCE–660 CE). The first, written by Jonathan Best, is based largely on primary sources, both written and archaeological. This initial history of Paekche serves, in part, to introduce the second, an extensively annotated translation of the oldest history of the kingdom, the Paekche Annals (Paekche pon’gi).

Cover: Emperor Huizong and Late Northern Song China: The Politics of Culture and the Culture of Politics

Emperor Huizong and Late Northern Song China: The Politics of Culture and the Culture of Politics

Ebrey, Patricia Buckley
Bickford, Maggie

Huizong was an exceptional emperor who lived through momentous times. During the quarter century Huizong ruled, the greatly enlarged scholar-official class had come into its own but was deeply divided by factional strife. Huizong and thousands of members of his family and court were taken captive, and the Song dynasty had to recreate itself in the South.

Cover: Intimate Politics: Marriage, the Market, and State Power in Southeastern China

Intimate Politics: Marriage, the Market, and State Power in Southeastern China

Friedman, Sara L.

Distinctive female dress styles, gender divisions of labor, and powerful same-sex networks have long distinguished villages in this coastal region of southeastern China from other rural Han communities. Intimate Politics explores these practices that have constituted eastern Hui’an residents, women in particular, as an anomaly among rural Han. This book asks what such practices have come to mean in a post-1949 socialist order that has incorporated forms of marriage, labor, and dress into a developmental scale extending from the primitive to the civilized.

Cover: Advertising Tower: Japanese Modernism and Modernity in the 1920s

Advertising Tower: Japanese Modernism and Modernity in the 1920s

Gardner, William O.

The activities of Japanese advertisers helped to define a new urban aesthetic emerging in the 1920s. This book examines some of the responses of Japanese authors to the transformation of Tokyo in the early decades of the twentieth century. William Gardner shows how modernist works offer new constructions of individual subjectivity amid the social and technological changes that provided the ground for the appearance of “mass media.”

Cover: Useless to the State:

Useless to the State: "Social Problems" and Social Engineering in Nationalist Nanjing, 1927-1937

Lipkin, Zwia

Underlying all of Nanjing’s 1930s policies was a concern for the capital’s image and looks—offensive people were allowed to exist as long as they remained invisible. Zwia Lipkin exposes both the process of social engineering and the ways in which the suppressed reacted to their abuse. This book puts the poor at the center of the picture, defying efforts to make them invisible.

Cover: The Making of Early Chinese Classical Poetry

The Making of Early Chinese Classical Poetry

Owen, Stephen

This study adopts a double approach to the poetry composed between the end of the first century B.C.E. and the third century C.E. It examines extant material from this period synchronically, as if it were not historically arranged. It also considers how the scholars of the late fifth and early sixth centuries selected this material and reshaped it to produce the standard account of classical poetry.

Cover: Pattern and Person: Ornament, Society, and Self in Classical China

Pattern and Person: Ornament, Society, and Self in Classical China

Powers, Martin J.

In Classical China, crafted artifacts offered a material substrate for abstract thought as graphic paradigms for social relationships. Focusing on the fifth to second centuries B.C., Martin Powers explores how these paradigms continued to inform social thought long after the material substrate had been abandoned. Historically, Pattern and Person traces the evolution of personhood in China from a condition of hereditary status to one of achieved social role and greater personal choice.

Cover: Crafting a Collection: The Cultural Contexts and Poetic Practice of the Huajian Ji (Collection from Among the Flowers)

Crafting a Collection: The Cultural Contexts and Poetic Practice of the Huajian Ji (Collection from Among the Flowers)

Shields, Anna M.

Compiled in 940 at the court of the kingdom of Shu, the Huajian ji is the earliest extant collection of song lyrics by literati poets. In this book, Anna Shields examines the influence of court culture on the creation of the anthology and the significance of imitation and convention in its lyrics. By illuminating the historical and literary contexts of the anthology, the author aims to situate the Huajian ji within larger questions of Chinese literary history.

Cover: The Beauty and the Book: Women and Fiction in Nineteenth-Century China

The Beauty and the Book: Women and Fiction in Nineteenth-Century China

Widmer, Ellen

This study of Chinese women in the book trade begins with three case studies, each of which probes one facet of the relationship between women and fiction in the early nineteenth century. Building on these case studies, the second half of the book focuses on the many sequels to the Dream of the Red Chamber and the significance of this novel for women. As Ellen Widmer shows, by the end of the century, women became increasingly involved in the novel as critical readers, writers, and editors.

Cover: The Late Tang: Chinese Poetry of the Mid-Ninth Century (827-860)

The Late Tang: Chinese Poetry of the Mid-Ninth Century (827-860)

Owen, Stephen

In this continuation of the literary history of the Tang, Stephen Owen analyzes the redirection of poetry that followed the deaths of the major poets of the High and Mid-Tang and the rejection of their poetic styles. Poets had always drawn on past poetry, but in the Late Tang, the poetic past was beginning to assume the form it would have for the next millennium; it was becoming a repertoire of styles, genres, and the voices of past poets--a repertoire that would endure.

Cover: The Sea of Learning: Mobility and Identity in Nineteenth-Century Guangzhou

The Sea of Learning: Mobility and Identity in Nineteenth-Century Guangzhou

Miles, Steven B.

Founded in the 1820s, the Xuehaitang (Sea of Learning Hall) was one of the premier academies of the nineteenth century. In The Sea of Learning, Steven Miles examines the construction of the celebratory discourse that portrayed the Xuehaitang as having radically altered literati culture in Guangzhou. Arguing that the academy did not exist in a scholarly vacuum, Miles contends that its location embedded it in social settings and networks that determined who utilized its resources and who celebrated its successes and values.

Cover: China Upside Down: Currency, Society, and Ideologies, 1808–1856

China Upside Down: Currency, Society, and Ideologies, 1808–1856

Lin, Man-houng

Many scholars have noted the role of China’s demand for silver in the emergence of the modern world. This book discusses the interaction of this demand and the early-nineteenth-century Latin American independence movements, changes in the world economy, the resulting disruptions in the Qing dynasty, and the transformation from the High Qing to modern China.

Cover: The Problem of Beauty: Aesthetic Thought and Pursuits in Northern Song Dynasty China

The Problem of Beauty: Aesthetic Thought and Pursuits in Northern Song Dynasty China

Egan, Ronald C.

During the Northern Song dynasty (960–1126), new ground was broken in aesthetic thought, particularly in the fields of art collecting, poetry criticism, connoisseurship of flowers, and the song lyric. These subjects were unprecedented when they appeared; consequently, bold exploration was coupled with anxiety about the worth of these interests, especially given the Confucian biases against these pursuits. By focusing on the “problem of beauty,” Ronald C. Egan calls attention to the difficulties that Northern Song innovators faced in justifying these new interests.

Cover: Out of the Cloister: Literati Perspectives on Buddhism in Sung China, 960-1279

Out of the Cloister: Literati Perspectives on Buddhism in Sung China, 960-1279

Halperin, Mark

This book demonstrates that representations of Buddhism by lay people underwent a major change during the T’ang–Sung transition. These changes built on basic transformations within the Buddhist and classicist traditions and sometimes resulted in the use of Buddhism and Buddhist temples as frames of reference to evaluate aspects of lay society. Buddhism, far from being pushed to the margins of Chinese culture, became even more a part of everyday elite Chinese life.

Cover: State or Merchant: Political Economy and Political Process in 1740s China

State or Merchant: Political Economy and Political Process in 1740s China

Dunstan, Helen

As a study of Confucian government in action, State or Merchant describes a mode of public policy discussion far less dominated by the Confucian scriptures than one might expect. As a contribution to intellectual history, the work offers a detailed view of members of an ostensibly Confucian government pursuing divergent agendas around the question of “state or merchant?”

Cover: The Heart of Time: Moral Agency in Twentieth-Century Chinese Fiction

The Heart of Time: Moral Agency in Twentieth-Century Chinese Fiction

Knight, Sabina

By examining how narrative strategies reinforce or contest deterministic paradigms, this work describes modern Chinese fiction’s unique contribution to ethical and literary debates over the possibility for meaningful moral action. By analyzing discourses of agency and fatalism and the ethical import of narrative structures, Knight explores how representations of determinism and moral responsibility changed over the twentieth century.

Cover: War Memory and Social Politics in Japan, 1945-2005

War Memory and Social Politics in Japan, 1945-2005

Seraphim, Franziska

Japan has long wrestled with the memories of World War II. Franziska Seraphim traces the activism of five civic organizations to examine the ways in which diverse organized memories have secured legitimate niches within the public sphere. The history of these domestic conflicts—over the commemoration of the war dead, the manipulation of national symbols, the teaching of history, or the articulation of relations with China and Korea—is crucial to the current discourse about apology and reconciliation in East Asia, and provides essential context for the global debate on war memory.

Cover: A New Practical Primer of Literary Chinese

A New Practical Primer of Literary Chinese

Rouzer, Paul

Forty lessons designed to introduce beginning students to the basic patterns and structures of Classical Chinese are taken from a number of pre-Han and Han texts selected to give students a grounding in exemplary Classical Chinese style. Two additional lessons use texts from later periods to help students appreciate the changes in written Chinese over the centuries.

Cover: The Uses of Memory: The Critique of Modernity in the Fiction of Higuchi Ichiyō

The Uses of Memory: The Critique of Modernity in the Fiction of Higuchi Ichiyō

Van Compernolle, Timothy J.

The writer Higuchi Ichiyō (1872–1896) has been described as a consummate stylist of classical prose, whose command of the linguistic and rhetorical riches of the premodern tradition might suggest that her writings are relics of the past with no concern for the problems of modern life. Timothy Van Compernolle investigates the social dimensions of Ichiyō’s imagination and argues that she reworked the Japanese literary tradition in order to understand and critique the emerging modernity of the Meiji period.

Cover: Practices of the Sentimental Imagination: Melodrama, the Novel, and the Social Imaginary in Nineteenth-Century Japan

Practices of the Sentimental Imagination: Melodrama, the Novel, and the Social Imaginary in Nineteenth-Century Japan

Zwicker, Jonathan E.

The history of the book in nineteenth-century Japan follows a course that resists the simple chronology often used to mark the divide between premodern and modern literary history. By examining the obscured histories of publication, circulation, and reception of widely consumed literary works from late Edo to the early Meiji period, Jonathan Zwicker traces a genealogy of the literary field across a long nineteenth century: one that stresses continuities between the generic conventions of early modern fiction and the modern novel.

Cover: China Turning Inward: Intellectual-Political Changes in the Early Twelfth Century

China Turning Inward: Intellectual-Political Changes in the Early Twelfth Century

Liu, James T. C.

During the traumatic opening decades of the Southern Sung, Emperor Kao-tsung’s unspoken determination to win imperial safety at any cost shaped not only court policy but Confucian intellectual developments. Liu explores how Kao-tsung used ideological window-dressing to consolidate extraordinary state power in the emperor’s hands.

Cover: Commerce in Culture: The Sibao Book Trade in the Qing and Republican Periods

Commerce in Culture: The Sibao Book Trade in the Qing and Republican Periods

Brokaw, Cynthia J.

Sibao today is a cluster of impoverished villages in the mountains of western Fujian. But from the late seventeenth through the early twentieth centuries, it was home to a flourishing publishing industry supplying much of south China through itinerant booksellers. Brokaw describes this rural, low-level operation at the end of the imperial period, tracing how Sibao’s socio-geographical character shaped and affected its progress.

Cover: Between Dreams and Reality: The Military Examination in Late Chosŏn Korea, 1600-1894

Between Dreams and Reality: The Military Examination in Late Chosŏn Korea, 1600-1894

Park, Eugene Y.

From the mid-seventeenth to the mid-nineteenth century, millions of Korean men trained for the state military examination, or mukwa. But few were actually appointed as military officials after passing the test. In this comprehensive history, Park argues that the mukwa was not only the state’s primary means of recruiting aristocrats as new members of the military bureaucracy, but also a way for the ruling elite to partially satisfy the status aspirations of marginalized regional elites, secondary status groups, commoners, and manumitted slaves.

Cover: Death and Social Order in Tokugawa Japan: Buddhism, Anti-Christianity, and the <i>Danka</i> System

Death and Social Order in Tokugawa Japan: Buddhism, Anti-Christianity, and the Danka System

Hur, Nam-lin

During the Tokugawa period (1600–1868) every household was expected to be affiliated with a Buddhist temple, and every citizen had to be given a Buddhist funeral. These customs gave rise to the danka system of funerary patronage, which became a public institution when the shogunate adopted it as an effective means of controlling the populace. In this study, Hur follows the historical development of the danka system and details the social forces, political concerns, and religious beliefs that drove this “economy of death.”

Cover: Disciplining the State: Virtue, Violence, and State-Making in Modern China

Disciplining the State: Virtue, Violence, and State-Making in Modern China

Thornton, Patricia M.

Scholars of European history assert that war makes states, just as states make war. This study finds that in China, the challenges of governing produced a trajectory of state-building in which the processes of moral and social control were at least as central to state-making as the exercise of coercive power. Thornton maps these complex processes during three critical reform periods, and offers a historical reading of state-making as a contest between central and local regimes.

Cover: The Taoists of Peking, 1800-1949: A Social History of Urban Clerics

The Taoists of Peking, 1800-1949: A Social History of Urban Clerics

Goossaert, Vincent

Looking at the activities of Taoist clerics in Peking, this book explores the workings of religion as a profession in one Chinese city during a period of dramatic modernization. The author focuses on ordinary religious professionals, most of whom remained obscure temple employees, showing that these Taoists were neither the socially despised illiterates dismissed in so many studies, nor otherworldly ascetics, but active participants in the religious economy of the city.

Cover: Love after <i>The Tale of Genji</i>: Rewriting the World of the Shining Prince

Love after The Tale of Genji: Rewriting the World of the Shining Prince

D'Etcheverry, Charo B.

The eleventh-century masterpiece The Tale of Genji has become the definitive expression of the aesthetics, poetics, and politics of life in the Heian court. But its brilliance has eclipsed the works of later Heian authors, who have since been displaced from the canon and relegated to critical obscurity. D’Etcheverry calls for a reevaluation of late Heian fiction by shedding new light upon this undervalued body of work and examining three representative texts as legitimate heirs to the literary legacy of Genji.

Cover: War and Faith: Ikko Ikki in Late Muromachi Japan

War and Faith: Ikko Ikki in Late Muromachi Japan

Tsang, Carol Richmond

During the sengoku era in Japan, warlords and religious institutions vied for supremacy, with powerhouses such as The Honganji branch of Jodo Shinshu Buddhism fanning violent uprisings of ikko ikki, bands of commoners fighting for various causes. Tsang delves into the complex relationship between these ikko leagues and the Honganji institution, arguing for a fuller picture of ikko ikki as a force in medieval Japanese history.

Cover: A Court on Horseback: Imperial Touring and the Construction of Qing Rule, 1680-1785

A Court on Horseback: Imperial Touring and the Construction of Qing Rule, 1680-1785

Chang, Michael G.

Between 1751 and 1784, the Qianlong emperor embarked upon six southern tours, traveling from Beijing to Jiangnan and back. These tours were exercises in political theater that took the Manchu emperor through one of the Qing empire’s most prosperous regions. This study elucidates the tensions and the constant negotiations characterizing the relationship between the imperial center and Jiangnan, which straddled the two key provinces of Jiangsu and Zhejiang.

Cover: Articulating Citizenship: Civic Education and Student Politics in Southeastern China, 1912—1940

Articulating Citizenship: Civic Education and Student Politics in Southeastern China, 1912—1940

Culp, Robert

This book reconstructs civic education and citizenship training in secondary schools in the lower Yangzi region during the Republican era. It also analyzes how students used the tools of civic education introduced in their schools to make themselves into young citizens, and explores the complex social and political effects of educated youths’ civic action.

Cover: Competition over Content: Negotiating Standards for the Civil Service Examinations in Imperial China (1127–1279)

Competition over Content: Negotiating Standards for the Civil Service Examinations in Imperial China (1127–1279)

De Weerdt, Hilde

Analyzing textbooks, examination questions and essays, and official and private commentary, Hilde De Weerdt examines how occupational, political, and intellectual groups shaped curricular standards and examination criteria during the Southern Song dynasty (1127–1279), and how examination standards in turn shaped political and intellectual agendas. These questions reframe the debate about the civil service examinations and their place in the imperial order.

Cover: Amid the Clouds and Mist: China's Colonization of Guizhou, 1200—1700

Amid the Clouds and Mist: China's Colonization of Guizhou, 1200—1700

Herman, John E.

In 1200, what is now southwest China--Guizhou, Yunnan, and the southern portion of Sichuan--was home to an assortment of strikingly diverse cultures and ruled by a multitude of political entities. One purpose of this book is to examine how China’s three late imperial dynasties--the Yuan, Ming, and Qing--conquered, colonized, and assumed control of the southwest. Another objective is to highlight the indigenous response to China’s colonization of the southwest, particularly that of the Nasu Yi people of western Guizhou and eastern Yunnan, the only group to leave an extensive written record.

Cover: From Foot Soldier to Finance Minister: Takahashi Korekiyo, Japan's Keynes

From Foot Soldier to Finance Minister: Takahashi Korekiyo, Japan's Keynes

Smethurst, Richard J.

From his birth into the lowest stratum of the samurai class to his assassination at the hands of right-wing militarists, Takahashi Korekiyo (1854–1936) lived through tumultuous times that shaped the course of modern Japan. This engaging biography underscores the profound influence of the charismatic seven-time finance minister on the political and economic development of Japan by casting new light on his unusual background, unique talents, and singular experiences.

Cover: Out of the Alleyway: Nakagami Kenji and the Poetics of Outcaste Fiction

Out of the Alleyway: Nakagami Kenji and the Poetics of Outcaste Fiction

Zimmerman, Eve

In this critical study of Nakagami’s life and oeuvre, Zimmerman delves into the writer’s literary world, exploring the genres, forms, and themes with which Nakagami worked and experimented. These chapters trace the biographical thread running through his works while foregrounding such diverse facets of his writing as his interest in the modern possibilities of traditional myths and forms of storytelling, his deployment of shocking tropes and images, and his crafting of a unique poetic language.

Cover: Some Assembly Required: Work, Community, and Politics in China's Rural Enterprises

Some Assembly Required: Work, Community, and Politics in China's Rural Enterprises

Chen, Calvin

One linchpin of China’s expansion has been township and village enterprises (TVEs), a vast group of firms with diverse modes of ownership and structure. Based on the author’s fieldwork in Zhejiang, this book explores the emergence and success of rural enterprises. This study also examines how ordinary rural residents have made sense of and participated in the industrialization engulfing them in recent decades.

Cover: China during the Great Depression: Market, State, and the World Economy, 1929–1937

China during the Great Depression: Market, State, and the World Economy, 1929–1937

Shiroyama, Tomoko

The Great Depression was a global phenomenon: every economy linked to international financial and commodity markets suffered. The aim of this book is not merely to show that China could not escape the consequences of drastic declines in financial flows and trade but also to offer a new perspective for understanding modern Chinese history.

Cover: Culture, Courtiers, and Competition: The Ming Court (1368–1644)

Culture, Courtiers, and Competition: The Ming Court (1368–1644)

Robinson, David M.

This collection of essays reveals the Ming court as an arena of competition and negotiation, where a large cast of actors pursued individual and corporate ends, personal agency shaped protocol and style, and diverse people, goods, and tastes converged.

Cover: Tradition, Treaties, and Trade: Qing Imperialism and Chosŏn Korea, 1850–1910

Tradition, Treaties, and Trade: Qing Imperialism and Chosŏn Korea, 1850–1910

Larsen, Kirk W.

Relations between the Chosŏn and Qing states are often cited as the prime example of the operation of the “traditional” Chinese “tribute system.” In contrast, this work contends that the motivations, tactics, and successes (and failures) of the late Qing Empire in Chosŏn Korea mirrored those of other nineteenth-century imperialists.

Cover: The Japanization of Modernity: Murakami Haruki between Japan and the United States

The Japanization of Modernity: Murakami Haruki between Japan and the United States

Suter, Rebecca M

Murakami Haruki is perhaps the best-known and most widely translated Japanese author of his generation. Bringing a comparative perspective to the study of Murakami’s fiction, Rebecca Suter complicates our understanding of the author’s oeuvre and highlights his contributions not only as a popular writer but also as a cultural critic on both sides of the Pacific.

Cover: When Our Eyes No Longer See: Realism, Science, and Ecology in Japanese Literary Modernism

When Our Eyes No Longer See: Realism, Science, and Ecology in Japanese Literary Modernism

Golley, Gregory

As industrial and scientific developments in early-twentieth-century Japan transformed the meaning of “objective observation,” modern writers and poets struggled to capture what they had come to see as an evolving network of invisible relations joining people to the larger material universe. For these artists, literary modernism was a crisis of perception before it was a crisis of representation. When Our Eyes No Longer See portrays an extraordinary moment in the history of this perceptual crisis and in Japanese literature during the 1920s and 1930s.

Cover: Emplacing a Pilgrimage: The Ōyama Cult and Regional Religion in Early Modern Japan

Emplacing a Pilgrimage: The Ōyama Cult and Regional Religion in Early Modern Japan

Ambros, Barbara

The sacred mountain Ōyama (literally, “Big Mountain”) has loomed over the religious landscape of early modern Japan. Ambros provides a narrative history of the mountain and its place in contemporary society and popular religion by focusing on the development of the Ōyama cult and its religious, political, and socioeconomic contexts.

Cover: The Tokyo War Crimes Trial: The Pursuit of Justice in the Wake of World War II

The Tokyo War Crimes Trial: The Pursuit of Justice in the Wake of World War II

Totani, Yuma

This book assesses the historical significance of the International Military Tribunal for the Far East (IMTFE)—commonly called the Tokyo trial—established as the eastern counterpart of the Nuremberg trial in the immediate aftermath of World War II.

Cover: Deliverance and Submission: Evangelical Women and the Negotiation of Patriarchy in South Korea

Deliverance and Submission: Evangelical Women and the Negotiation of Patriarchy in South Korea

Chong, Kelly H.

South Korea is home to some of the largest evangelical Protestant congregations in the world. This book investigates the meaning of—and the reasons behind—a particular aspect of contemporary South Korean evangelicalism: the intense involvement of middle-class women. Drawing upon extensive ethnographic fieldwork in Seoul that explores the relevance of women’s experiences to Korean evangelicalism, Kelly H. Chong not only helps provide a broader picture of the evangelical movement’s success in South Korea, but addresses the global question of contemporary women’s attraction to religious traditionalism.

Cover: Uchida Hyakken: A Critique of Modernity and Militarism in Prewar Japan

Uchida Hyakken: A Critique of Modernity and Militarism in Prewar Japan

DiNitto, Rachel

The literary career of Uchida Hyakken (1889–1971) encompassed a wide variety of styles and genres. This book takes up Hyakken’s fiction and essays written during Japan’s prewar years to investigate the intersection of his literature with the material and discursive surroundings of the time.

Cover: Accidental Incest, Filial Cannibalism, and Other Peculiar Encounters in Late Imperial Chinese Literature

Accidental Incest, Filial Cannibalism, and Other Peculiar Encounters in Late Imperial Chinese Literature

Lu, Tina

Writers of late imperial fiction and drama were, Lu argues, deeply engaged with questions about the nature of the Chinese empire and of the human community. This book traces how these political questions were addressed in fiction through extreme situations: husbands and wives torn apart in periods of political upheaval, families so disrupted that incestuous encounters become inevitable, times so desperate that people have to sell themselves to be eaten.

Cover: Men of Letters within the Passes: Guanzhong Literati in Chinese History, 907–1911

Men of Letters within the Passes: Guanzhong Literati in Chinese History, 907–1911

Ong, Chang Woei

The main theme of this book is the interaction between two “places,” China and Guanzhong, the capital area of several dynasties. This work examines how Guanzhong literati conceptualized three sets of relations: central/regional, “official”/“unofficial,” and national/local. It further traces the formation over the last millennium of the imperial state of a critical communal self-consciousness.

Cover: The Naked Gaze: Reflections on Chinese Modernity

The Naked Gaze: Reflections on Chinese Modernity

Rojas, Carlos

This volume focuses on tropes of visuality and gender to reflect on shifting understandings of the significance of Chineseness, modernity, and Chinese modernity. Through detailed readings of narrative works by eight authors of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the study identifies three distinct constellations of visual concerns corresponding to the late imperial, mid-twentieth century, and contemporary periods, respectively.

Cover: Reading Tao Yuanming: Shifting Paradigms of Historical Reception (427 - 1900)

Reading Tao Yuanming: Shifting Paradigms of Historical Reception (427 - 1900)

Swartz, Wendy

Tao Yuanming (365?–427), although dismissed as a poet following his death, is now considered one of China’s greatest writers. This study of the posthumous reputation of a central figure in Chinese literary history, the mechanisms at work in the reception of his works, and the canonization of Tao himself and of particular readings of his works sheds light on the transformation of literature and culture in premodern China.

Cover: The Power of the Buddhas: The Politics of Buddhism during the Koryo Dynasty (918 - 1392)

The Power of the Buddhas: The Politics of Buddhism during the Koryo Dynasty (918 - 1392)

Vermeersch, Sem

Buddhism in medieval Korea is characterized as “State Protection Buddhism,” a religion whose primary purpose was to rally support (supernatural and popular) for and legitimate the state. This study is an attempt to specify Buddhism’s place in Koryo and to ascertain to what extent and in what areas Buddhism functioned as a state religion.

Cover: Sublime Voices: The Fictional Science and Scientific Fiction of Abe Kōbō

Sublime Voices: The Fictional Science and Scientific Fiction of Abe Kōbō

Bolton, Christopher

Since the 1950s, Abe Kōbō (1924–1993) has achieved an international reputation for his surreal or grotesque brand of avant-garde literature. Christopher Bolton explores how this reconciliation of ideas and dialects is for Abe part of the process whereby texts and individuals form themselves—a search for identity that must take place at the level of the self and society at large.

Cover: Critical Aesthetics: Kobayashi Hideo, Modernity, and Wartime Japan

Critical Aesthetics: Kobayashi Hideo, Modernity, and Wartime Japan

Dorsey, James

This study revolves around the career of Kobayashi Hideo (1902–1983), one of the seminal figures in the history of modern Japanese literary criticism, whose interpretive vision was forged amidst the cultural and ideological crises that dominated intellectual discourse between the 1920s and the 1940s. Although his interweaving of aesthetics and ideology exhibited elements of both resistance and complicity, his critical ethos served ultimately to undergird his wartime fascist stance by encouraging acquiescence to authority, championing patriotism, and calling for more vigorous thought control.

Cover: When Empire Comes Home: Repatriation and Reintegration in Postwar Japan

When Empire Comes Home: Repatriation and Reintegration in Postwar Japan

Watt, Lori

Following the end of World War II in Asia, the Allied powers repatriated over six million Japanese nationals from colonies and battlefields throughout Asia and deported more than a million colonial subjects from Japan to their countries of origin. Lori Watt analyzes how the human remnants of empire, those who were moved and those who were left behind, served as sites of negotiation in the process of the jettisoning of the colonial project and in the creation of new national identities in Japan.

Cover: Dry Spells: State Rainmaking and Local Governance in Late Imperial China

Dry Spells: State Rainmaking and Local Governance in Late Imperial China

Snyder-Reinke, Jeffrey

Chinese officials put considerable effort into managing the fiscal and legal affairs of their jurisdictions, but they also devoted significant time and energy to performing religious rituals on behalf of the state. This groundbreaking study explores this underappreciated aspect of Chinese political life by investigating rainmaking activities organized or conducted by local officials in the Qing dynasty.

Cover: Down a Narrow Road: Identity and Masculinity in a Uyghur Community in Xinjiang China

Down a Narrow Road: Identity and Masculinity in a Uyghur Community in Xinjiang China

Dautcher, Jay

The Uyghurs, a Turkic group, account for half the population of the Xinjiang region in northwestern China. This ethnography presents a thick description of life in the Uyghur suburbs of Yining, a city near the border with Kazakhstan, and situates that account in a broader examination of Uyghur culture. The narrative is framed around the terms identity, community, and masculinity. As the author shows, Yining’s Uyghurs express a set of individual and collective identities organized around place, gender, family relations, friendships, occupation, and religious practice.

Cover: Eating Rice from Bamboo Roots: The Social History of a Community of Handicraft Papermakers in Rural Sichuan, 1920–2000

Eating Rice from Bamboo Roots: The Social History of a Community of Handicraft Papermakers in Rural Sichuan, 1920–2000

Eyferth, Jacob

Eating Rice from Bamboo Roots charts the vicissitudes of a rural community of papermakers in Sichuan. The process of transforming bamboo into paper involves production-related and social skills, as well as the everyday skills that allowed these papermakers to survive in an era of tumultuous change. This book traces the changes in the distribution of knowledge that led to a massive transfer of technical control from villages to cities, from primary producers to managerial elites, and from women to men. It addresses the issue of how revolution, state-making, and marketization have changed rural China.

Cover: Spectacle and Sacrifice: The Ritual Foundations of Village Life in North China

Spectacle and Sacrifice: The Ritual Foundations of Village Life in North China

Johnson, David

This book is about the ritual world of a group of rural settlements in Shanxi province in pre-1949 North China. The great festivals described in this book were their supreme collective achievements and were carried out virtually without assistance from local officials or educated elites, clerical or lay. Newly discovered liturgical manuscripts allow author David Johnston to reconstruct North Chinese temple festivals in unprecedented detail and prove that they are sharply different from the Daoist- and Buddhist-based communal rituals of South China.

Cover: Daoist Modern: Innovation, Lay Practice, and the Community of Inner Alchemy in Republican Shanghai

Daoist Modern: Innovation, Lay Practice, and the Community of Inner Alchemy in Republican Shanghai

Liu, Xun

This book explores the Daoist encounter with modernity through the activities of Chen Yingning (1880–1969), a famous lay Daoist master, and his group in early twentieth-century Shanghai. In contrast to the usual narrative of Daoist decay, with its focus on monastic decline, clerical corruption, and popular superstitions, this study tells a story of Daoist resilience, reinvigoration, and revival.

Cover: Power of Place: The Religious Landscape of the Southern Sacred Peak (Nanyue 南嶽) in Medieval China

Power of Place: The Religious Landscape of the Southern Sacred Peak (Nanyue 南嶽) in Medieval China

Robson, James

Throughout Chinese history mountains have been integral components of the religious landscape. Early in Chinese history a set of five mountains were co-opted into the imperial cult and declared sacred peaks, yue, demarcating and protecting the boundaries of the Chinese imperium. James Robson’s analysis of these topics demonstrates the value of local studies and the emerging field of Buddho–Daoist studies in research on Chinese religion.

Cover: Wretched Rebels: Rural Disturbances on the Eve of the Chinese Revolution

Wretched Rebels: Rural Disturbances on the Eve of the Chinese Revolution

Bianco, Lucien
Liddell, Philip

This book, a condensed translation of the prize-winning Jacqueries et révolution dans la Chine du XXe siècle, focuses on “spontaneous” rural unrest, uninfluenced by revolutionary intellectuals. The author shows that the predominant forms of protest were directed not against the landowning class but against agents of the state, and suggests that twentieth-century Chinese peasants were less different from seventeenth- or eighteenth-century French peasants than might be imagined and points to continuities between pre- and post-1949 rural protest.

Cover: Sovereignty at the Edge: Macau and the Question of Chineseness

Sovereignty at the Edge: Macau and the Question of Chineseness

Clayton, Cathryn H.

How have conceptions and practices of sovereignty shaped how ­Chineseness is imagined? This ethnography addresses this question through the example of Macau, a southern Chinese city that was a Portuguese colony from the 1550s until 1999. Various stories about sovereignty and Chineseness and their interrelationship were told in Macau in the 1990s—this book is about those stories and how they informed the lives of Macau residents in ways that allowed different relationships among sovereignty, subjectivity, and culture to become thinkable.

Cover: Negotiating Urban Space: Urbanization and Late Ming Nanjing

Negotiating Urban Space: Urbanization and Late Ming Nanjing

Fei, Si-yen

Urbanization was central to development in late imperial China. Yet its impact is heatedly debated, although scholars agree that it triggered neither Weberian urban autonomy nor Habermasian civil society. Using Nanjing—a metropolis along the Yangzi River and onetime capital of the Ming—as a central case, the author demonstrates that, prompted by this unique form of urban–rural contradiction, the actions and creations of urban residents transformed the city on multiple levels: as an urban community, as a metropolitan region, as an imagined space, and, finally, as a discursive subject.

Cover: Fishing Wars and Environmental Change in Late Imperial and Modern China

Fishing Wars and Environmental Change in Late Imperial and Modern China

Muscolino, Micah S.

This work explores interactions between society and environment in China’s most important marine fishery, the Zhoushan Archipelago off the coast of Zhejiang and Jiangsu, from its nineteenth-century expansion to the exhaustion of the most important fish species in the 1970s. Micah S. Muscolino gives us a better understanding of the relationship between past ecological changes and present environmental challenges.

Cover: Superstitious Regimes: Religion and the Politics of Chinese Modernity

Superstitious Regimes: Religion and the Politics of Chinese Modernity

Nedostup, Rebecca

We live in a world shaped by secularism—the separation of numinous power from political authority and religion from the political, social, and economic realms of public life. This book explores the modern recategorization of religious practices and people and examines how state power affected the religious lives and physical order of local communities.

Cover: Gender Struggles: Wage-Earning Women and Male-Dominated Unions in Postwar Japan

Gender Struggles: Wage-Earning Women and Male-Dominated Unions in Postwar Japan

Gerteis, Christopher

In the formative years of the Japanese labor movement after World War II, the socialist unions affiliated with the General Council of Trade Unions (the labor federation known colloquially as Sohyo) formally endorsed the principles of women’s equality in the workforce. However, union leaders did not embrace the legal framework for gender equality mandated by their American occupiers. Christopher Gerteis demonstrates that organized labor’s discourse on womanhood not only undermined women’s status within the labor movement but also prevented unions from linking with the emerging woman-led, neighborhood-centered organizations that typified social movements in the 1960s—a misstep that contributed to the decline of the socialist labor movement in subsequent decades.

Cover: Defining Engagement: Japan and Global Contexts, 1640 - 1868

Defining Engagement: Japan and Global Contexts, 1640 - 1868

Hellyer, Robert I.

Presenting fresh insights on the internal dynamics and global contexts that shaped foreign relations in early modern Japan, Robert I. Hellyer challenges the still largely accepted wisdom that the Tokugawa shogunate, guided by an ideology of seclusion, stifled intercourse with the outside world, especially in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Cover: America's China Trade in Historical Perspective: The Chinese and American Performance

America's China Trade in Historical Perspective: The Chinese and American Performance

May, Ernest R.
Fairbank, John King

This volume explores commercial relations between the United States and China from the eighteenth century until 1949, fleshing out with facts the romantic and shadowy image of "the China trade." These nine chapters by specialists in the field have developed from papers they presented at a conference supported by the national Committee on American-East Asian Relations.

Cover: Culture and the State in Late Chosŏn Korea

Culture and the State in Late Chosŏn Korea

Haboush, JaHyun Kim
Deuchler, Martina

Investigating the late sixteenth through the nineteenth century, this work looks at the shifting boundaries between the Chosŏn state and the adherents of Confucianism, Buddhism, Christianity, and popular religions. The contributors argue that the power of each group and the space it occupied were determined by a dynamic interaction of ideology, governmental policies, and the group’s self-perceptions. Collectively, the volume counters the static view of the Korean Confucian state and elucidates its relationship to the wider Confucian community and religious groups.

Cover: Colonial Modernity in Korea

Colonial Modernity in Korea

Shin, Gi-Wook
Robinson, Michael

This volume seeks to shed new light on the nationalist paradigm of Japanese repression and exploitation that has dominated the study of Korea’s colonial period (1910–1945). The authors adopt a more inclusive, pluralistic approach that stresses the complex relations among colonialism, modernity, and nationalism. One group of essays analyzes how various aspects of modernity emerged in the colonial context and how they were mobilized by the Japanese for colonial domination, with often unexpected results. A second group examines the development of various forms of identity from nation to gender to class.

Cover: Constructing “Korean” Origins: A Critical Review of Archaeology, Historiography, and Racial Myth in Korean State-Formation Theories

Constructing “Korean” Origins: A Critical Review of Archaeology, Historiography, and Racial Myth in Korean State-Formation Theories

Pai, Hyung Il

In this wide-ranging study, Hyung Il Pai examines how archaeological finds from throughout Northeast Asia have been used in Korea to construct a myth of state formation. This myth emphasizes the ancient development of a pure Korean race that created a civilization rivaling those of China and Japan and a unified state controlling a wide area in Asia. Through a new analysis of the archaeological data, Pai shows that the Korean state was in fact formed much later and that it reflected diverse influences from throughout Northern Asia, particularly the material culture of Han China.

Cover: Shikitei Sanba and the Comic Tradition in Edo Fiction

Shikitei Sanba and the Comic Tradition in Edo Fiction

Leutner, Robert W.

Cover: Washing Silk: The Life and Selected Poetry of Wei Chuang

Washing Silk: The Life and Selected Poetry of Wei Chuang

Yates, Robin D. S.

This work offers information that is useful to those interested in the literature, history, and general culture of medieval China. The translations bring to modern readers of English poetry the pleasures of becoming acquainted with a complex and innovative voice from the Chinese past.

Cover: A New History of Korea

A New History of Korea

Lee, Ki-baik
Wagner, Edward W.

One of the first, most widely-read and respected histories of Korea, Ki-baik Lee’s Han’guksa Sillon has been translated into English by Edward W. Wagner. A New History of Korea offers Western readers a distillation of the best scholarship on Korean history and culture from the earliest times to the student revolution of 1960. Translated twice into Japanese and into Chinese as well, this book is noteworthy for its full and integrated discussion of major currents in Korea’s cultural history.

Cover: T’ang Transformation Texts: A Study of the Buddhist Contribution to the Rise of Vernacular Fiction and Drama in China

T’ang Transformation Texts: A Study of the Buddhist Contribution to the Rise of Vernacular Fiction and Drama in China

Mair, Victor H.

This is the most comprehensive study of pien-wen (“transformation texts” i.e., tales of metamorphosis) in any language since the manuscripts were discovered at the beginning of this century in a remote cave complex in northwest China. They are the earliest written vernacular narratives in China and are thus extremely important in the history of Chinese language and literature.

Cover: Remembering Paradise: Nativism and Nostalgia in Eighteenth-Century Japan

Remembering Paradise: Nativism and Nostalgia in Eighteenth-Century Japan

Nosco, Peter

Remembering Paradise studies three major eighteenth-century nativist scholars in Japan: Kada no Azumamaro, Kamo no Mabuchi, and the celebrated Motoori Norinaga. Peter Nosco demonstrates that these scholars, frequently depicted as the formulators of rabid xenophobia, were intellectuals engaged in a quest for meaning, wholeness, and solace in what they perceived to be disordered times.

Cover: Escape from the Wasteland: Romanticism and Realism in the Fiction of Mishima Yukio and Oe Kenzaburo

Escape from the Wasteland: Romanticism and Realism in the Fiction of Mishima Yukio and Oe Kenzaburo

Napier, Susan

Lurid depictions of sex and impotence, themes of emperor worship and violence, the use of realism and myth--these characterize the fiction of Mishima Yukio and Oe Kenzaburo. Napier discovers surprising similarities as well as provocative dissimilarities in the work of two writers of radically different political orientations. Napier places Yukio’s and Kenzaburo’s fiction in the context of postwar Japanese political and social realities and, in a new preface for the paperback edition, reflects on each writer’s position in the tradition of Japanese literature.

Lurid depictions of sex and impotence, themes of emperor worship and violence, the use of realism and myth--these characterize the fiction of Mishima Yukio and Oe Kenzaburo. Napier discovers surprising similarities as well as provocative dissimilarities in the work of two writers of radically different political orientations.

Cover: The Willow in Autumn: Ryutei Tanehiko

The Willow in Autumn: Ryutei Tanehiko

Markus, Andrew

In early nineteenth-century Japan—the “silver age” of Edo-period literature—Ryutei Tanehiko was a well-known author of popular illustrated fiction. This account of his life and works covers his early yomihon (lengthy romances of improbable perils and adventures) and his gokan (intricately plotted stories in simple language intended for a general audience). Special emphasis is given his most popular work—the illustrated serial Nise Muraskai inaka Genji (An Impostor Murasaki and Rustic Genji), which ran for fourteen years—Japan’s first national bestseller.

Cover: Inside a Service Trade: Studies in Contemporary Chinese Prose

Inside a Service Trade: Studies in Contemporary Chinese Prose

Wagner, Rudolph

This work explores the potential of literary analysis for illuminating the People’s Republic of China’s social, intellectual, and political history, illustrating swings in the Party line with stories, articles, and cartoons from the popular press.

Cover: Readings in Chinese Literary Thought

Readings in Chinese Literary Thought

Owen, Stephen

This dual-language compilation of seven complete major works and many shorter pieces from the Confucian period through the Ch’ing dynasty will be indispensable to students of Chinese literature as well as theorists and scholars of other languages.

Cover: Praying for Power: Buddhism and the Formation of Gentry Society in Late-Ming China

Praying for Power: Buddhism and the Formation of Gentry Society in Late-Ming China

Brook, Timothy

Timothy Brook studies three widely separated and economically dissimilar counties. He draws on rich data in monastic gazetteers to examine the patterns and social consequences of patronage.

Cover: The Korean Singer of Tales

The Korean Singer of Tales

Pihl, Marshall

P’ansori, the traditional oral narrative of Korea, is sung by a highly trained soloist to the accompaniment of complex drumming. In the first book-length treatment in English of this remarkable art form, Pihl traces the history of p’ansori from its roots in shamanism and folktales through its nineteenth-century heyday under highly acclaimed masters and discusses its evolution in the twentieth century. After examining the place of p’ansori in popular entertainment and its textual tradition, he analyzes the nature of texts in the repertoire and explains the vocal and rhythmic techniques required to perform them.

Cover: The Confucian Transformation of Korea: A Study of Society and Ideology

The Confucian Transformation of Korea: A Study of Society and Ideology

Deuchler, Martina

This important new study explores the impact of Neo-Confucianism on Korean society and politics between the fourteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Cover: Population, Disease, and Land in Early Japan, 645–900

Population, Disease, and Land in Early Japan, 645–900

Farris, William Wayne

W. Wayne Farris has developed the first systematic analysis of early Japanese population, the role of disease in economic development, and the impact of agricultural technology and practices. In doing so, he reinterprets the nature of ritsuryō institutions.

Cover: Wind Against the Mountain: The Crisis of Politics and Culture in Thirteenth-Century China

Wind Against the Mountain: The Crisis of Politics and Culture in Thirteenth-Century China

Davis, Richard L.

Richard Davis has expertly crafted a stirring narrative of the last years of Song, focusing on loyalist resistance to Mongol domination as more than just a political event. Seen from the perspective of the conquered, the phenomenon of martyrdom reveals much about the cultural history of the Song.

Cover: Powerful Relations: Kinship, Status, and the State in Sung China (960-1279)

Powerful Relations: Kinship, Status, and the State in Sung China (960-1279)

Bossler, Beverly

The realignment of the Chinese social order that took place over the course of the Sung dynasty set the pattern for Chinese society throughout most of the later imperial era. This study examines that realignment from the perspective of specific Sung families, using data on two groups of Sung elites—the grand councilors who led the bureaucracy and locally prominent gentlemen in Wu-chou (in modern Chekiang).

Cover: Studies in the Comic Spirit in Modern Japanese Fiction

Studies in the Comic Spirit in Modern Japanese Fiction

Cohn, Joel R.

Unlike traditional Japanese literature, which has a rich tradition of comedy, modern Japanese literature is commonly associated with a high seriousness of purpose. In this pathbreaking study, Joel Cohn analyzes works by three writers—Ibuse Masuji (1898–1993), Dazai Osamu (1909–1948), and Inoue Hisashi (1934– )—whose works constitute a relentless assault on the notion that comedy cannot be part of serious literature.

Cover: Precious Volumes: An Introduction to Chinese Sectarian Scriptures from the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

Precious Volumes: An Introduction to Chinese Sectarian Scriptures from the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

Overmyer, Daniel L.

This book, the most detailed and comprehensive study of pao-chuan in any language, studies 34 early examples of this literature in order to understand the origins and development of this textual tradition. Although the work focuses on content and structure, it also treats the social context of these works as well as their transmission and ritual use.

Cover: Poetry and Painting in Song China: The Subtle Art of Dissent

Poetry and Painting in Song China: The Subtle Art of Dissent

Murck, Alfreda

During the Song dynasty (960-1278), some members of China’s elite found an elegant and subtle means of dissent: landscape painting. By examining literary archetypes, the titles of paintings, contemporary inscriptions, and the historical context, Alfreda Murck shows that certain paintings expressed strong political opinions--some transparent, others deliberately concealed. She argues that the capacity of painting’s systems of reference to allow scholars to express dissent with impunity contributed to the art’s vitality and longevity.

Cover: Evil and/or/as the Good: Omnicentrism, Intersubjectivity, and Value Paradox in Tiantai Buddhist Thought

Evil and/or/as the Good: Omnicentrism, Intersubjectivity, and Value Paradox in Tiantai Buddhist Thought

Ziporyn, Brook

“Other than the devil, there is no Buddha; other than the Buddha, there is no devil.” The Chinese monk Siming Zhili (960–1028) uttered this remark as part of his justification for his self-immolation. An exposition of the intent, implications, and resonances of this one sentence, this book expands and unravels the context in which the seeming paradox of the ultimate identity of good and evil is to be understood. In analyzing this idea, Brook Ziporyn provides an overview of the development of Tiantai thought from the fifth through the eleventh centuries in China.

Cover: Articulated Ladies: Gender and the Male Community in Early Chinese Texts

Articulated Ladies: Gender and the Male Community in Early Chinese Texts

Rouzer, Paul

This volume analyzes the representation of gender and desire in elite, male-authored literary texts in China dating from roughly 200 B.C. until 1000 A.D.

Cover: Studies in Chinese Literature

Studies in Chinese Literature

Bishop, John Lyman

While specialized studies in Chinese literature multiply, an adequate history of Chinese literature based upon such studies has still to be written. Most of the eight articles reprinted in this volume have been unavailable for some time, and their reissue has been undertaken to fulfill a persistent demand.

Cover: Chinese-English Dictionary (A Chinese-English Dictionary Compiled for the China Inland Mission): Revised American Edition

Chinese-English Dictionary (A Chinese-English Dictionary Compiled for the China Inland Mission): Revised American Edition

Mathews, Robert Henry

Published in 1931 and revised in 1943, this small but comprehensive dictionary contains 7,773 Chinese characters and 104,000 compounds taken from the classics, general literature, magazines, and newspapers. Necessary corrections in regard to pronunciation have been made; the tones of the characters have been checked; and a large number of terms have been added in order to facilitate the reading of periodicals and newspapers—whether political, economic, chemical, or military.

Cover: Les Lettres de 1289 et 1305 des ilkhan Aryun et Oljeitu a Phillipe le Bel

Les Lettres de 1289 et 1305 des ilkhan Aryun et Oljeitu a Phillipe le Bel

Mostaert, Antoine
Cleaves, Francis Woodman

This volume, beginning the new Scripta Mongolica Monograph Series, presents two remarkable documents—the letters of 1289 and 1305 from the Mongolian potentates Ilkhan Argun and Ilkhan Olje’itu to Philip the Fair of France. The texts and their implications are thoughtfully discussed with generous annotation. Both documents are fully reproduced in a sequence of excellent plates; the text is transliterated. These valuable materials, along with the volume’s enlightening discussion, will be of great value to scholars in the field.

Cover: Bolor Erike: Mongolian Chronicle, Part I-V

Bolor Erike: Mongolian Chronicle, Part I-V

Rasipungsuy

Cover: Printing for Profit: The Commercial Publishers of Jianyang, Fujian (11th-17th Centuries)

Printing for Profit: The Commercial Publishers of Jianyang, Fujian (11th-17th Centuries)

Chia, Lucille

From the eleventh through the seventeenth centuries, the publishers of Jianyang in Fujian province played a conspicuous role in the Chinese book trade. The broad cultural, historical, and geographical scope of the Jianyang book trade makes it an ideal subject for the study of publishing in China. Based on an extensive study of Jianyang imprints, genealogies of the leading families of printers, local histories, documents, and annotated catalogs and bibliographies, Lucille Chia has written not only a history of commercial printing but also a wide-ranging study of the culture of the book in traditional China.

Cover: Allegories of Desire: Esoteric Literary Commentaries of Medieval Japan

Allegories of Desire: Esoteric Literary Commentaries of Medieval Japan

Klein, Susan Blakeley

One of the more intriguing developments within medieval Japanese literature is the incorporation into the teaching of waka poetry of the practices of initiation ceremonies and secret transmissions found in esoteric Buddhism. The main figure in this development was the obscure thirteenth-century poet Fujiwara Tameaki, grandson of the famous poet Fujiwara Teika and a priest in a tantric Buddhist sect. Tameaki’s commentaries and teachings transformed secular texts such as the Tales of Ise and poetry anthologies such as the Kokin waka shu into complex allegories of Buddhist enlightenment. These commentaries were transmitted to his students during elaborate initiation ceremonies. In later periods, Tameaki’s specific ideas fell out of vogue, but the habit of interpreting poetry allegorically continued.

Cover: To Become a God: Cosmology,  Sacrifice, and Self-Divinization in Early China

To Become a God: Cosmology, Sacrifice, and Self-Divinization in Early China

Puett, Michael J.

By treating the issues of cosmology, sacrifice, and self-divinization in a historical and comparative framework that attends to the contemporary significance of specific arguments, Puett shows that the basic cosmological assumptions of ancient China were the subject of far more debate than is generally thought.

Cover: Writing and Materiality in China: Essays in Honor of Patrick Hanan

Writing and Materiality in China: Essays in Honor of Patrick Hanan

Zeitlin, Judith T.
Liu, Lydia H.

Speaking about Chinese writing entails thinking about how writing speaks through various media. In the guises of the written character and its imprints, traces, or ruins, writing is more than textuality. The goal of this volume is to consider the relationship of writing to materiality in China’s literary history and to ponder the physical aspects of the production and circulation of writing. To speak of the thing-ness of writing is to understand it as a thing in constant motion, transported from one place or time to another, one genre or medium to another, one person or public to another.

Cover: <i>Rulin waishi</i> and Cultural Transformation in Late Imperial China

Rulin waishi and Cultural Transformation in Late Imperial China

Shang, Wei

Rulin waishi (The Unofficial History of the Scholars) is more than a landmark in the history of the Chinese novel. This eighteenth-century work, which was deeply embedded in the intellectual and literary discourses of its time, challenges the reader to come to grips with the mid-Qing debates over ritual and ritualism, and the construction of history, narrative, and lyricism. Wu Jingzi’s (1701–54) ironic portrait of literati life was unprecedented in its comprehensive treatment of the degeneration of mores, the predicaments of official institutions, and the Confucian elite’s futile struggle to reassert moral and cultural authority.

Cover: Words Well Put: Visions of Poetic Competence in the Chinese Tradition

Words Well Put: Visions of Poetic Competence in the Chinese Tradition

Sanders, Graham

As traced in Words Well Put, the vision of poetic competence evolved for over a millennium from calculated performances of inherited words to sincere passionate outbursts to displays of verbal wit combining calculation with the appearance of spontaneity. This book tells the story of the development of poetic competence to uncover the complexity of the concept and to identify the sources and exemplars of that complexity.

Cover: Householders: The Reizei Family in Japanese History

Householders: The Reizei Family in Japanese History

Carter, Steven D.

As direct descendants of the great courtier-poets Fujiwara no Shunzei (1114-1204) and his son Teika (1162-1244), the heirs of the noble Reizei house can claim an unbroken literary lineage spanning over eight centuries. Carter combines strands of family history, literary criticism, and historical research in a coherent narrative tracking the evolution of the Reizei Way. The book features an extensive appendix of one hundred poems by poets affiliated with the Reizei house over the years.

Cover: The Divine Nature of Power: Chinese Ritual Architecture at the Sacred Site of Jinci

The Divine Nature of Power: Chinese Ritual Architecture at the Sacred Site of Jinci

Miller, Tracy

Using an interdisciplinary approach drawing on the research of archaeologists, anthropologists, and religious, social, and art historians, this book seeks to recover the motivations behind the creation of religious art, including temple buildings, sculpture, and wall paintings.

Cover: Beacon Fire and Shooting Star: The Literary Culture of the Liang (502–557)

Beacon Fire and Shooting Star: The Literary Culture of the Liang (502–557)

Tian, Xiaofei

The Liang dynasty (502-557) was one of the most brilliant and creative periods in Chinese history and is one of the most underestimated and misunderstood. This book is devoted to contextualizing the literary culture of this era, exploring not only the literary works themselves but also the processes of literary production and the intricate interactions of religion and literature.

Cover: Lost Soul:

Lost Soul: "Confucianism" in Contemporary Chinese Academic Discourse

Makeham, John

Since the mid-1980s, Taiwan and mainland China have witnessed a sustained resurgence of academic and intellectual interest in ruxue—“Confucianism”—variously conceived as a form of culture, an ideology, a system of learning, and a tradition of normative values. This study aims to show how ruxue has been conceived in order to assess the achievements of this enterprise.

Cover: Through a Forest of Chancellors: Fugitive Histories in Liu Yuan’s <i>Lingyan ge</i>, an Illustrated Book from Seventeenth-Century Suzhou

Through a Forest of Chancellors: Fugitive Histories in Liu Yuan’s Lingyan ge, an Illustrated Book from Seventeenth-Century Suzhou

Burkus-Chasson, Anne

Liu Yuan’s Lingyan ge, a woodblock-printed book from 1669, re-creates a portrait gallery that memorialized 24 vassals of the early Tang court. This study examines the dialogues created among the texts and images in Lingyan ge from multiple perspectives. Anne Burkus-Chasson argues that despite a general epistemological shift toward visual forms of knowledge in the seventeenth century, looking and reading were still seen as being in conflict. This conflict plays out among the leaves of Liu Yuan’s book.

Cover: The Sage Learning of Liu Zhi: Islamic Thought in Confucian Terms

The Sage Learning of Liu Zhi: Islamic Thought in Confucian Terms

Murata, Sachiko
Chittick, William C.
Tu, Wei-ming

Liu Zhi (ca. 1670–1724) was one of the most important scholars of Islam in traditional China. His Tianfang xingli (Nature and Principle in Islam), the Chinese-language text translated here, focuses on the roots or principles of Islam. The copious annotations to the translation explain Liu’s text and draw attention to parallels in Chinese-, Arabic-, and Persian-language works as well as differences.

Cover: Ancestors, Virgins, and Friars: Christianity as a Local Religion in Late Imperial China

Ancestors, Virgins, and Friars: Christianity as a Local Religion in Late Imperial China

Menegon, Eugenio

In the sixteenth century, European missionaries brought a foreign and global religion to China. Converts then transformed this new religion into a local one. Focusing on the still-active Catholic communities of Fuan county in northeast Fujian, this project’s implications extend beyond the issue of Christianity in China to the wider fields of religious and social history and the early modern history of global intercultural relations.

Cover: Empire's Twilight: Northeast Asia under the Mongols

Empire's Twilight: Northeast Asia under the Mongols

Robinson, David M.

The rise of the Mongol empire transformed world history. Its collapse in the mid-fourteenth century had equally profound consequences. Four themes dominate this study of the late Mongol empire in Northeast Asia during this chaotic era: the need for a regional perspective encompassing all states and ethnic groups in the area; the process and consequences of pan-Asian integration under the Mongols; the tendency for individual and family interests to trump those of dynasty, country, or linguistic affiliation; and finally, the need to see Koryo Korea as part of the wider Mongol empire.

Cover: Empire of Texts in Motion: Chinese, Korean, and Taiwanese Transculturations of Japanese Literature

Empire of Texts in Motion: Chinese, Korean, and Taiwanese Transculturations of Japanese Literature

Thornber, Karen Laura

By the turn of the twentieth century, Japan’s military and economic successes made it the dominant power in East Asia, drawing hundreds of thousands of Chinese, Korean, and Taiwanese students to the metropole and sending thousands of Japanese to other parts of East Asia. Drawing extensively on vernacular sources in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean, this book analyzes the most active of these contact nebulae: semicolonial Chinese, occupied Manchurian, and colonial Korean and Taiwanese transculturations of Japanese literature.

Cover: Children as Treasures: Childhood and the Middle Class in Early Twentieth Century Japan

Children as Treasures: Childhood and the Middle Class in Early Twentieth Century Japan

Jones, Mark

Cover: Traversing the Frontier: The <i>Man'yōshū</i> Account of a Japanese Mission to Silla in 736–737

Traversing the Frontier: The Man'yōshū Account of a Japanese Mission to Silla in 736–737

Horton, H. Mack

In 736, a Japanese diplomatic mission set out for Silla, on the Korean peninsula. The envoys met with adverse events and returned empty-handed. The futile journey proved fruitful in one respect: a collection of 145 Japanese poems and their Sino-Japanese headnotes and footnotes made its way into the eighth-century poetic anthology Man’yōshū, becoming one of the earliest Japanese literary travel narratives. Featuring deft translations and incisive analysis, this study investigates the poetics and thematics of the Silla sequence, uncovering what is known about the actual historical event and the assumptions and concerns that guided its re-creation as a literary artifact and then helped shape its reception among contemporary readers.

Cover: The Transport of Reading: Text and Understanding in the World of Tao Qian (365–427)

The Transport of Reading: Text and Understanding in the World of Tao Qian (365–427)

Ashmore, Robert

For centuries, readers of Tao Qian have felt directly addressed by his poetic voice. This theme in the reception of Tao Qian, moreover, developed alongside an assumption that Tao was fundamentally misunderstood during his own age. This book revisits Tao’s approach to his readers by attempting to situate it within the particular poetics of address that characterized the Six Dynasties classicist tradition. How would Tao Qian have anticipated that his readers would understand him?

Cover: Experimental Arts in Postwar Japan: Moments of Encounter, Engagement, and Imagined Return

Experimental Arts in Postwar Japan: Moments of Encounter, Engagement, and Imagined Return

Sas, Miryam

Cover: Deus Destroyed: The Image of Christianity in Early Modern Japan

Deus Destroyed: The Image of Christianity in Early Modern Japan

Elison, George

Cover: Heavenly Warriors: The Evolution of Japan's Military, 500-1300

Heavenly Warriors: The Evolution of Japan's Military, 500-1300

Farris, William Wayne

Heavenly Warriors traces in detail the evolutionary development of weaponry, horsemanship, military organization, and tactics from Japan’s early conflicts with Korea up to the full-blown system of the samurai.

Cover: Tears of Longing: Nostalgia and the Nation in Japanese Popular Song

Tears of Longing: Nostalgia and the Nation in Japanese Popular Song

Yano, Christine R.

Informed by theories of nostalgia, collective memory, cultural nationalism, and gender, this book draws on the author’s extensive fieldwork in probing the practice of identity-making and the processes at work when Japan becomes “Japan.”

Cover: Empire and Aftermath: Yoshida Shigeru and the Japanese Experience, 1878-1954

Empire and Aftermath: Yoshida Shigeru and the Japanese Experience, 1878-1954

Dower, J. W.

Cover: Sailor Diplomat: Nomura Kichisaburo and the Japanese-American War

Sailor Diplomat: Nomura Kichisaburo and the Japanese-American War

Mauch, Peter

Cover: ‘Dividing the Realm in Order to Govern’: The Spatial Organization of the Song State

‘Dividing the Realm in Order to Govern’: The Spatial Organization of the Song State

Mostern, Ruth

Sovereignty is based on control of territory. This book uses Song China to explain how a pre-industrial regime organized itself spatially in order to exercise authority. On more than a thousand occasions, the Song court founded, abolished, promoted, demoted, and reordered jurisdictions in an attempt to maximize the effectiveness of limited resources in a climate of shifting priorities, to placate competing constituencies, and to address military and economic crises.

Cover: Manifest in Words, Written on Paper: Producing and Circulating Poetry in Tang Dynasty China

Manifest in Words, Written on Paper: Producing and Circulating Poetry in Tang Dynasty China

Nugent, Christopher M. B.

This study aims to engage the textual realities of medieval literature by shedding light on the material lives of poems during the Tang, from their initial oral or written instantiation through their often lengthy and twisted paths of circulation. Tang poems exist today in stable written forms assumed to reflect their creators’ original intent. Yet Tang poetic culture was based on hand-copied manuscripts and oral performance. We have almost no access to this poetry as it was experienced by contemporaries. But if we do not understand how Tang people composed, experienced, and transmitted poetry, we miss something fundamental about the roles of memory and copying in the circulation of poetry as well as readers’ dynamic participation in the creation of texts.

Cover: Songs of Contentment and Transgression: Discharged Officials and Literati Communities in Sixteenth-Century North China

Songs of Contentment and Transgression: Discharged Officials and Literati Communities in Sixteenth-Century North China

Tan, Tian Yuan

A discharged official in mid-Ming China faced significant changes in his life. This book explores three such officials in the sixteenth century—Wang Jiusi, Kang Hai, and Li Kaixian—who turned to literary endeavors when forced to retire. Instead of formal writing, however, they engaged in the stigmatized genre of qu (songs), a collective term for drama and sanqu. As their efforts reveal, a disappointing end to an official career and a physical move away from the center led to their embrace of qu and the pursuit of a marginalized literary genre. After their retirements, these three writers became cultural leaders in their native regions.

Cover: A Place in Public: Women’s Rights in Meiji Japan

A Place in Public: Women’s Rights in Meiji Japan

Anderson, Marnie S.

During the early decades of the Meiji period, the Japanese encountered the idea that the social position of women reflected a country’s level of civilization. Anderson argues that shifts in the gender system led to contradictory consequences for women. On the one hand, women gained access to the language of rights and the chance to represent themselves in public and play a limited political role; on the other, the modern Japanese state permitted women’s political participation only as an expression of their “citizenship through the household” and codified their formal exclusion from the political process.

Cover: Ancestral Memory in Early China

Ancestral Memory in Early China

Brashier, K. E.

Ancestral ritual in early China was an orchestrated dance between what was present (the offerings and the living) and what was absent (the ancestors). This study is a history of the early Chinese ancestral cult, particularly its cognitive aspects. Ancestor worship was not, the author contends, merely mechanical and thoughtless. Rather, it was an idea system that aroused serious debates about the nature of postmortem existence, served as the religious backbone to Confucianism, and may even have been the forerunner of Daoist and Buddhist meditation practices.

Cover: The Poetics of Sovereignty: On Emperor Taizong of the Tang Dynasty

The Poetics of Sovereignty: On Emperor Taizong of the Tang Dynasty

Chen, Jack W.

Emperor Taizong (r. 626–49) of the Tang is remembered as an exemplary ruler. This study addresses that aura of virtuous sovereignty and Taizong’s construction of a reputation for moral rulership through his own literary writings—with particular attention to his poetry. The author highlights the relationship between historiography and the literary and rhetorical strategies of sovereignty, contending that, for Taizong, and for the concept of sovereignty in general, politics is inextricable from cultural production.

Cover: The Dynamics of Masters Literature: Early Chinese Thought from Confucius to Han Feizi

The Dynamics of Masters Literature: Early Chinese Thought from Confucius to Han Feizi

Denecke, Wiebke

The importance of the rich corpus of “Masters Literature” that developed in early China since the fifth century BCE has long been recognized. But just what are these texts? Scholars have often approached them as philosophy, but these writings have also been studied as literature, history, and anthropological, religious, and paleographic records. How should we translate these texts for our times? This book explores these questions through close readings of seven examples of Masters Literature and asks what proponents of a “Chinese philosophy” gained by creating a Chinese equivalent of philosophy and what we might gain by approaching these texts through other disciplines, questions, and concerns.

Cover: Seeing Stars: Sports Celebrity, Identity, and Body Culture in Modern Japan

Seeing Stars: Sports Celebrity, Identity, and Body Culture in Modern Japan

Frost, Dennis J.

Dennis J. Frost traces the emergence and evolution of sports celebrity in Japan from the seventeenth through the twenty-first centuries. Frost explores how various constituencies have repeatedly molded and deployed representations of individual athletes, revealing that sports stars are socially constructed phenomena, the products of both particular historical moments and broader discourses of celebrity.

Cover: The Political Economy of Reform in Post-Mao China

The Political Economy of Reform in Post-Mao China

Perry, Elizabeth J.
Wong, Christine

In December 1978 the Chinese Communist Party announced dramatic changes in policy for both agriculture and industry that seemed to repudiate the Maoist “road to socialism” in favor of certain “capitalist” tendencies. The motives behind these changes, the nature of the reforms, and their effects upon the economy and political life of countryside and city are here analyzed by five political scientists and five economists.

Cover: China’s Intellectuals and the State: In Search of a New Relationship

China’s Intellectuals and the State: In Search of a New Relationship

Goldman, Merle
Cheek, Timothy
Hamrin, Carol Lee

Today’s intellectuals in China inherit a mixed tradition in terms of their relationship to the state. In this stimulating work, twelve China scholars examine that troubled and changing relationship. They focus primarily on the post-Mao years when bitter memories of the Cultural Revolution and China’s renewed quest for modernization have at times allowed intellectuals increased leeway in expression and more influence in policy-making.

Cover: Chinese Society on the Eve of Tiananmen: The Impact of Reform

Chinese Society on the Eve of Tiananmen: The Impact of Reform

Davis, Deborah

In individual case studies, the twelve contributors to this volume document the uneven decollectivization and decentralization of China’s economy in the post-Mao years and the great diversity of the social and political consequences. They deal with the effects of the more materialistic and individualistic reward system on both public and private life in the countryside and in urban settings and the new expectations that economic changes engendered.

Cover: The Dao of Muhammad: A Cultural History of Muslims in Late Imperial China

The Dao of Muhammad: A Cultural History of Muslims in Late Imperial China

Ben-Dor Benite, Zvi

This book documents an Islamic–Confucian school of scholarship that flourished, mostly in the Yangzi Delta, in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Drawing on previously unstudied materials, it reconstructs the network of Muslim scholars responsible for the creation and circulation of a large corpus of Chinese Islamic written material—the so-called Han Kitab. Overturning the idea that participation in Confucian culture necessitated the obliteration of all other identities, this book offers insight into the world of a group of scholars who felt that their study of the Islamic classics constituted a rightful “school” within the Confucian intellectual landscape.

Cover: The Harvard Korean Studies Bibliography: 80,000 References on Korea

The Harvard Korean Studies Bibliography: 80,000 References on Korea

Hoffmann, Frank

With references to some 50,000 articles, 17,000 books, 4,000 chapters in books, 7,000 dissertations, and 4,000 reviews, The Harvard Korean Studies Bibliography is the largest listing of Western-language publications on Korea available in CD format. The coverage spans works in all subject areas published from the eighteenth century to the present in English and other European languages using the Roman alphabet. EndNote® software included with the CD allows searches by author, title, subject, or date of publication.

Cover: Christianity in China: Early Protestant Missionary Writings

Christianity in China: Early Protestant Missionary Writings

Barnett, Suzanne Wilson
Fairbank, John King

These studies examine writings by Protestant missionaries in China from 1819 to 1890. Nine historians contribute to a composite picture of the missionary pioneers, the literature they produced, the changes they sustained through immersion in Chinese culture, and their efforts to interpret that culture for their constituencies at home.

Cover: The Missionary Enterprise in China and America

The Missionary Enterprise in China and America

Fairbank, John King

For more than a century missionaries were the main contact points between the Chinese and American peoples. Here, fourteen contributors studying both sides of the missionary effort, in China and in America, present case studies that suggest conclusions and themes for research.

Cover: Our Ordered Lives Confess: Three Nineteenth-Century American Missionaries in East Shantung

Our Ordered Lives Confess: Three Nineteenth-Century American Missionaries in East Shantung

Hyatt, Irwin T.

This spirited book is a study of the adjustments of three nineteenth-century missionaries—Tarleton Perry Crawford and Lottie Moon of the Southern Baptist Convention, and Presbyterian Calvin Wilson Mateer—to life in northeast China. Irwin Hyatt seeks to discover why only some Americans placed among Chinese will find friends and a new appreciation of life.

Cover: Mutual Images: Essays in American-Japanese Relations

Mutual Images: Essays in American-Japanese Relations

Iriye, Akira

Cover: Race to Pearl Harbor: The Failure of the Second London Naval Conference and the Onset of World War II

Race to Pearl Harbor: The Failure of the Second London Naval Conference and the Onset of World War II

Pelz, Stephen E.

Until now Japanese military history in the thirties has been viewed largely from the standpoint of the army. Stephen Pelz corrects this imbalance. After 1933, the Japanese Navy made significant technological advances, withdrew from the disarmament system during the Second London Naval Conference of 1935, and began a program of secret expansion. The Japanese naval authorities generated a naval race with the United States, and this competition was a major cause of Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor.

Cover: Combined Indices to Shih Chi and the Notes of P'ei Yin, Ssu-ma Cheng, Chang Shou-chieh, and Takigawa Kametaro

Combined Indices to Shih Chi and the Notes of P'ei Yin, Ssu-ma Cheng, Chang Shou-chieh, and Takigawa Kametaro

Hung, William

Cover: An Introduction to Sung Poetry

An Introduction to Sung Poetry

Yoshikawa, Kojiro

Despite the marked influence of Chinese poetry on that of the West in modern times, this book is the first full-length critical study of any major period of Chinese poetry to appear in a Western language. The period here dealt with is neither ancient China nor the medieval T’ang dynasty, from which the most numerous and most familiar previous translations have been drawn, but the era of the Sung dynasty (960–1279), of which the culture and thought were much more complex and “modern.”

Cover: The Secret Speeches of Chairman Mao: From the Hundred Flowers to the Great Leap Forward

The Secret Speeches of Chairman Mao: From the Hundred Flowers to the Great Leap Forward

MacFarquhar, Roderick
Wu, Eugene
Cheek, Timothy

During two crucial years when his movements were being initiated, Mao Zedong addressed various Party groups behind closed doors to explain the new policies and exhort compliance. Recorded at the time and collected for limited circulation in the 1960s by his admirers, the speeches, question-and-answer sessions, and letters here translated have never before been published in China or the West. Introductory essays by Roderick MacFarquhar, Benjamin Schwartz, Eugene Wu, Merle Goldman, and Timothy Cheek provide a context for evaluating and interpreting the nineteen texts translated in this volume.

Cover: Anti-Foreignism and Western Learning in Early Modern Japan: The New Theses of 1825

Anti-Foreignism and Western Learning in Early Modern Japan: The New Theses of 1825

Wakabayashi, Bob Tadashi

This study analyzes New Theses (Shinron) by Aizawa Seishisai (1781–1863) and its contribution to Japanese political thought and policy during the early modern era. New Theses is found to be indispensable to our understanding of Japan’s transformation from a feudal to a modern state.

Cover: Word, Image, and Deed in the Life of Su Shi

Word, Image, and Deed in the Life of Su Shi

Egan, Ronald C.

Remembered today primarily as a poet, calligrapher, and critic, the protean Su Shi was an outspoken player in the contentious politics and intellectual debates of the Northern Song dynasty. In this comprehensive study, Ronald C. Egan analyzes Su’s literary and artistic work against the background of eleventh-century developments within Buddhist and Confucian thought and Su’s dogged disagreement with the New Policies of Wang Anshi.

Cover: The Colloquial Short In China: A Study of the San-Yen Collections

The Colloquial Short In China: A Study of the San-Yen Collections

Bishop, John Lyman

Cover: A Selected List of Books and Articles on Japan in English, French, and German, Rev. and Enl. edition

A Selected List of Books and Articles on Japan in English, French, and German, Rev. and Enl. edition

Borton, Hugh

Cover: Realms of Literacy: Early Japan and the History of Writing

Realms of Literacy: Early Japan and the History of Writing

Lurie, David B.

Drawing on varied archaeological and archival sources, David B. Lurie highlights the diverse modes and uses of writing that coexisted in Japan between the first and eighth centuries. This book illuminates not only the textual practices of early Japanese civilization but also the comparative history of writing and literacy in the ancient world.

Cover: Mao’s Invisible Hand: The Political Foundations of Adaptive Governance in China

Mao’s Invisible Hand: The Political Foundations of Adaptive Governance in China

Heilmann, Sebastian
Perry, Elizabeth J.

Observers have been predicting the demise of China’s Communist state since Mao’s death. Yet policymakers have managed the fastest sustained economic expansion in world history. This book shows that many contemporary techniques of governance have their roots in experimental policy generation and implementation dating to the revolution and early PRC.

Cover: Coins, Trade, and the State: Economic Growth in Early Medieval Japan

Coins, Trade, and the State: Economic Growth in Early Medieval Japan

Segal, Ethan Isaac

The political fragmentation and constant warfare of medieval Japan did not necessarily inhibit economic growth. Rather, as this book shows, these conditions created opportunities for a wider spectrum of society to participate in trade, markets, and monetization, laying the groundwork for Japan’s transformation into an early modern society.

Cover: Picturing Heaven in Early China

Picturing Heaven in Early China

Tseng, Lillian Lan-ying

Tian, or Heaven, had been used in China since the Western Zhou to indicate both the sky and the highest god. Examining excavated materials, Lillian Tseng shows how Han-dynasty artisans transformed various notions of Heaven—as the mandate, the fantasy, and the sky—into pictorial entities, not by what they looked at, but by what they looked into.

Cover: The People's Republic of China at 60: An International Assessment

The People's Republic of China at 60: An International Assessment

Kirby, William C.

To mark the sixtieth anniversary of the People’s Republic of China, the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies convened a conference to consider this question: After three decades of internal strife, followed by reform, entrepreneurialism, and internationalization, is the PRC here for the dynastic long haul? This volume presents an energetic exchange of views on the topic.

Cover: Worldly Stage: Theatricality in Seventeenth-Century China

Worldly Stage: Theatricality in Seventeenth-Century China

Volpp, Sophie

In seventeenth-century China, the theater began to occupy an important ideological niche among traditional cultural elites. Notions of performance and spectatorship came to animate diverse aspects of literati cultural production. In Worldly Stage, Sophie Volpp sheds new light on the capacity of drama to comment on the cultural politics of the age.

Cover: Reading North Korea: An Ethnological Inquiry

Reading North Korea: An Ethnological Inquiry

Ryang, Sonia

Sonia Ryang casts new light on the study of North Korean culture and society by reading literary texts as sources of ethnographic data. Ryang focuses critical attention on three central themes—love, war, and self—that reflect the nearly complete overlap of the personal, social, and political realms in North Korean society.

Cover: Brokers of Empire: Japanese Settler Colonialism in Korea, 1876–1945

Brokers of Empire: Japanese Settler Colonialism in Korea, 1876–1945

Uchida, Jun

Jun Uchida draws on previously unused materials in multi-language archives to uncover the obscured history of the Japanese civilians who settled in Korea between 1876 and 1945, with particular focus on the first generation of “pioneers” between the 1910s and 1930s who actively mediated Japan's colonial presence on the Korean peninsula.

Cover: The People’s Post Office: The History and Politics of the Japanese Postal System, 1871–2010

The People’s Post Office: The History and Politics of the Japanese Postal System, 1871–2010

Maclachlan, Patricia L.

Patricia L. Maclachlan analyzes the institutions, interest groups, and leaders involved in the evolution of Japan’s postal system from the early Meiji period until 2010. At the crux of her analysis is Prime Minister Koizumi Jun’ichirō’s crusade to privatize Japan’s postal services, one of the most astonishing political achievements in postwar Japanese history.

Cover: The Money Doctors from Japan: Finance, Imperialism, and the Building of the Yen Bloc, 1895–1937

The Money Doctors from Japan: Finance, Imperialism, and the Building of the Yen Bloc, 1895–1937

Schiltz, Michael

This study investigates the Japanese experiment with financial imperialism—or “yen diplomacy”—at several key moments between the acquisition of Taiwan in 1895 and the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese War in 1937, and how these practices impacted the development of receiving nations and defined their geopolitical position in the postcolonial world.

Cover: Toward a History Beyond Borders: Contentious Issues in Sino-Japanese Relations

Toward a History Beyond Borders: Contentious Issues in Sino-Japanese Relations

Yang, Daqing
Liu, Jie
Mitani, Hiroshi
Gordon, Andrew
Esselstrom, Erik
Fogel, Joshua A.
Fraleigh, Matthew
George, Timothy S.
Lawson, Konrad M.
Rubinfien, Louisa
Yang, Daqing

Originally published simultaneously in Chinese and Japanese in 2006, this volume brings to English-language readers the fruits of a critical long-term project by Chinese and Japanese historians addressing contentious issues in their shared modern histories.

Cover: Ten Thousand Scrolls: Reading and Writing in the Poetics of Huang Tingjian and the Late Northern Song

Ten Thousand Scrolls: Reading and Writing in the Poetics of Huang Tingjian and the Late Northern Song

Wang, Yugen

This study revolves around the poet Huang Tingjian (1045–1105), who wrote at the height of one of the most transformative periods in Chinese literary history, the Northern Song (960–1126). Wang examines how the emerging print culture of the period shaped the poetic theory and practice of Huang and the Jiangxi School of Poetry he founded.

Cover: A Northern Alternative: Xue Xuan (1389–1464) and the Hedong School

A Northern Alternative: Xue Xuan (1389–1464) and the Hedong School

Koh, Khee Heong

In this first systematic study in English of the highly influential yet overlooked thinker Xue Xuan (1389–1464), author Khee Heong Koh seeks to redress Xue’s marginalization while showing how a study interested mainly in “ideas” can integrate social and intellectual history to offer a broader picture of history.

Cover: Visionary Journeys: Travel Writings from Early Medieval and Nineteenth-Century China

Visionary Journeys: Travel Writings from Early Medieval and Nineteenth-Century China

Tian, Xiaofei

This book explores two important moments of dislocation in Chinese history, the early medieval period (317–589 CE) and the nineteenth century. Xiaofei Tian juxtaposes a rich array of materials from these two periods in comparative study, linking these historical moments in their unprecedented interactions, and intense fascination, with foreign cultures.

Cover: Making Personas: Transnational Film Stardom in Modern Japan

Making Personas: Transnational Film Stardom in Modern Japan

Fujiki, Hideaki

Examining the transnational film star system and the formations of historically important stars, Making Personas casts new light on Japanese modernity from the 1910s to 1930s. The book shows how film stardom began and evolved, looking at the production, representation, circulation, and reception of performers’ images in film and other media.

Cover: Picturing the True Form: Daoist Visual Culture in Traditional China

Picturing the True Form: Daoist Visual Culture in Traditional China

Huang, Shih-shan Susan

In this richly illustrated book, Shih-shan Susan Huang investigates the visual culture of Daoism, China’s primary indigenous religion, from the tenth through thirteenth centuries with references to earlier and later times. Huang shows how Daoist image-making goes beyond the usual dichotomy of text and image to incorporate writings in image design.

Cover: A Continuous Revolution: Making Sense of Cultural Revolution Culture

A Continuous Revolution: Making Sense of Cultural Revolution Culture

Mittler, Barbara

Cultural Revolution Culture, often denigrated as pure propaganda, was liked not only in its heyday but continues to be enjoyed today. Considering this art—music, stage works, posters, comics, literature—in its longue durée, Barbara Mittler suggests it builds on a tradition of earlier works, allowing for proliferation in contemporary China.

Cover: Empire of the Dharma: Korean and Japanese Buddhism, 1877–1912

Empire of the Dharma: Korean and Japanese Buddhism, 1877–1912

Kim, Hwansoo Ilmee

Hwansoo Ilmee Kim explores the dynamic relationship between Korean and Japanese Buddhists in the years leading up to the Japanese annexation of Korea. Conventional narratives portray Korean Buddhists as complicit in the religious annexation of the peninsula, but this view fails to account for the diverse visions, interests, and strategies that drove both sides.

Cover: An Imperial Path to Modernity: Yoshino Sakuzō and a New Liberal Order in East Asia, 1905–1937

An Imperial Path to Modernity: Yoshino Sakuzō and a New Liberal Order in East Asia, 1905–1937

Han, Jung-Sun N.

Jung-Sun N. Han examines the role of liberal intellectuals in reshaping transnational ideas and internationalist aspirations into national values and imperial ambitions in early twentieth-century Japan. Han’s focus is on the ideas and activities of Yoshino Sakuzo (1878–1933), who was a champion of prewar Japanese liberalism and Taisho democracy.

Cover: Detective Fiction and the Rise of the Japanese Novel, 1880–1930

Detective Fiction and the Rise of the Japanese Novel, 1880–1930

Saito, Satoru

Satoru Saito examines the similarities between detective fiction and the novel in prewar Japan. Arguing that interactions between the genres were critical moments of literary engagement, Saito demonstrates how detective fiction provided a framework through which to examine and critique Japan’s literary formations and its modernizing society.

Cover: On the Margins of Empire: Buraku and Korean Identity in Prewar and Wartime Japan

On the Margins of Empire: Buraku and Korean Identity in Prewar and Wartime Japan

Bayliss, Jeffrey Paul

Koreans and Burakumin, two of the largest minority groups in modern Japan, share a history of discrimination that spans the decades of Japan’s modernization and imperial expansion. Jeffrey Paul Bayliss explores the historical processes that cast them as “others” on the margins of the Japanese empire and that also influenced their views of themselves.

Cover: Courtesans, Concubines, and the Cult of Female Fidelity

Courtesans, Concubines, and the Cult of Female Fidelity

Bossler, Beverly

Courtesans, Concubines, and the Cult of Female Fidelity traces changing gender relations in China from the tenth to fourteenth centuries. By taking women—and men’s relationships with women—seriously, this book makes a case for the centrality of gender relations in the social, political, and intellectual life of the Song and Yuan dynasties.

Cover: Government by Mourning: Death and Political Integration in Japan, 1603-1912

Government by Mourning: Death and Political Integration in Japan, 1603-1912

Hirai, Atsuko

Strict decrees on the observance of death were part of the myriad laws enacted under the Tokugawa shogunate to control nearly every aspect of Japanese life. Hirai explores how this class of legislation played an integrative part in Japanese society by codifying religious beliefs and customs the Japanese people had cherished for generations.

Cover: Public Law, Private Practice: Politics, Profit, and the Legal Profession in Nineteenth-Century Japan

Public Law, Private Practice: Politics, Profit, and the Legal Profession in Nineteenth-Century Japan

Flaherty, Darryl E.

Practitioners of private law opened the way toward Japan’s legal modernity in ways the samurai and the state could not. Tracing law regimes from Edo to Meiji, Flaherty shows how the legal profession emerged as a force for change in modern Japan, founding private universities and political parties, and contributing to twentieth-century legal reform.

Cover: From Miracle to Maturity: The Growth of the Korean Economy

From Miracle to Maturity: The Growth of the Korean Economy

Eichengreen, Barry
Perkins, Dwight H.
Shin, Kwanho

South Korea was one of the poorest economies on the planet after the Korean War; by the twenty-first century, it had become a middle-income country, home to some of the world’s leading industrial corporations. From Miracle to Maturity offers an analysis of Korea’s remarkable economic growth and considers whether its economy is now underperforming.

Cover: Buddhism, Unitarianism, and the Meiji Competition for Universality

Buddhism, Unitarianism, and the Meiji Competition for Universality

Mohr, Michel

In the late 1800s, Japanese leaders invited Unitarian missionaries to Japan to further modernization. Mohr looks at the debates sparked by the encounter between Unitarianism and Buddhism and considers how the idea of “universal truth” was used by both missionaries and by Japanese intellectuals and religious leaders to promote their own agendas.

Cover: Strange Eventful Histories: Identity, Performance, and Xu Wei's <i>Four Cries of a Gibbon</i>

Strange Eventful Histories: Identity, Performance, and Xu Wei's Four Cries of a Gibbon

Kwa, Shiamin

In Four Cries of a Gibbon by the late-Ming dynasty playwright Xu Wei, characters move between life and death, and male and female, as they seek to articulate who they truly are. In this first critical study and annotated translation, Shiamin Kwa considers how Wei’s exploration of identity paved the way for further reflection in later fiction and drama.

Cover: Home and the World: Editing the “Glorious Ming” in Woodblock-Printed Books of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

Home and the World: Editing the “Glorious Ming” in Woodblock-Printed Books of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

He, Yuming

China’s sixteenth and seventeenth centuries saw an unprecedented explosion in the production of woodblock-printed books. This volume considers what a wide range of late Ming books reveal about their readers’ ideas of a pleasurable private life, as well as their orientations toward early modernity and toward traditional Chinese sources of authority.

Cover: Two-Timing Modernity: Homosocial Narrative in Modern Japanese Fiction

Two-Timing Modernity: Homosocial Narrative in Modern Japanese Fiction

Vincent, J. Keith

Two-Timing Modernity integrates queer, feminist, and narratological approaches to show how key works by Japanese male authors in the early twentieth century encompassed both a straight future and a queer past by staging tensions between Japan’s newly heteronormative culture and the recent memory of a male homosocial past now read as perverse.

Cover: Critics and Commentators: The <i>Book of Poems</i> as Classic and Literature

Critics and Commentators: The Book of Poems as Classic and Literature

Rusk, Bruce

The earliest anthology of Chinese poetry, the Book of Poems has served as an ideal of literary perfection and also a major subject of literary criticism since imperial times. Bruce Rusk unravels the competitive, mutually influential relationship through which classical and literary scholarship on the poems co-evolved from the Han dynasty to the Qing.

Cover: A Comprehensive Manchu-English Dictionary

A Comprehensive Manchu-English Dictionary

Norman, Jerry

A reference work from one of the world’s preeminent linguists, A Comprehensive Manchu–English Dictionary substantially enlarges and revises Jerry Norman’s 1978 Concise Manchu–English Lexicon. With hundreds of new entries and a new introduction on pronunciation and script, it will become the standard English-language resource on the Manchu language.

Cover: Income Inequality in Korea: An Analysis of Trends, Causes, and Answers

Income Inequality in Korea: An Analysis of Trends, Causes, and Answers

An, Chong-Bum
Bosworth, Barry

Income Inequality in Korea explores the relationship between economic growth and social developments over the last three decades. Analyzing equalizing trends in the 1980s to early 1990s and reversals since the 1997–1998 financial crisis, the authors examine the growing gap between rich and poor in Korea and offer solutions for reducing inequality.

Cover: Knowing the Amorous Man: A History of Scholarship on <i>Tales of Ise</i>

Knowing the Amorous Man: A History of Scholarship on Tales of Ise

Newhard, Jamie L.

One of the central literary texts of the Heian period (794–1185), Tales of Ise has inspired extensive commentary. Offering a comprehensive history of the work’s reception, Jamie L. Newhard reveals the ideological and aesthetic issues shaping criticism over the centuries as the audience for classical Japanese literature expanded beyond the aristocracy.

Cover: Anarchist Modernity: Cooperatism and Japanese-Russian Intellectual Relations in Modern Japan

Anarchist Modernity: Cooperatism and Japanese-Russian Intellectual Relations in Modern Japan

Konishi, Sho

Sho Konishi traces the emergence from 1860 to 1930 of transnational networks of Russian and Japanese “cooperatist anarchists” devoted to creating a state-free society. Arguing that this radical movement forms one of the intellectual foundations of modern Japan, Konishi offers a new approach to Japanese history that challenges Western narratives.

Cover: The Real Modern: Literary Modernism and the Crisis of Representation in Colonial Korea

The Real Modern: Literary Modernism and the Crisis of Representation in Colonial Korea

Hanscom, Christopher P.

The Real Modern examines three Korean authors of the 1930s—Pak T’aewon, Kim Yujong, and Yi T’aejun—whose works critique competing modes of literary representation in the period of Japanese colonial rule. A re-reading of modernist fiction within the imperial context, it sheds new light on the relationship between political discourse and aesthetics.

Cover: Drifting among Rivers and Lakes: Southern Song Dynasty Poetry and the Problem of Literary History

Drifting among Rivers and Lakes: Southern Song Dynasty Poetry and the Problem of Literary History

Fuller, Michael A.

The dominant literary genre in Song dynasty China, shi poetry reflected profound changes occurring in Chinese culture from 960–1279. Michael A. Fuller traces the intertwining of shi poetry and Neo-Confucianism that led to the cultural synthesis of the last years of the Southern Song and set the pattern of Chinese society for the next six centuries.

Cover: Martial Spectacles of the Ming Court

Martial Spectacles of the Ming Court

Robinson, David M.

David M. Robinson explores how grand displays like the royal hunt, archery contests, and the imperial menagerie were presented in literature and art in the early Ming dynasty. He argues these spectacles were highly contested sites where emperors and court ministers staked competing claims about rulership and the role of the military in the polity.

Cover: Modern Archaics: Continuity and Innovation in the Chinese Lyric Tradition, 1900–1937

Modern Archaics: Continuity and Innovation in the Chinese Lyric Tradition, 1900–1937

Wu, Shengqing

After the 1911 fall of the Qing dynasty, many declared the classical Chinese poetic tradition dead. In Modern Archaics, Shengqing Wu draws on extensive archival research into the poetry collections and literary journals of two generations of writers to challenge this claim and demonstrate the continuing significance of the classical form.

Cover: Cherishing Antiquity: The Cultural Construction of an Ancient Chinese Kingdom

Cherishing Antiquity: The Cultural Construction of an Ancient Chinese Kingdom

Milburn, Olivia

The rapid rise and fall of the southern kingdom of Wu inspired many memorials in the former capital city of Suzhou, including the building of temples, shrines, and monuments. Analyzing the history of Wu as recorded in ancient Chinese texts and literature, Olivia Milburn illuminates the cultural endurance of this powerful but short-lived kingdom.

Cover: The Burden of Female Talent: The Poet Li Qingzhao and Her History in China

The Burden of Female Talent: The Poet Li Qingzhao and Her History in China

Egan, Ronald C.

An exception to the rule that the first-rank poets in premodern China were men, the woman poet Li Qingzhao (1084-1150s) occupies a crucial place in Chinese literature. Ronald C. Egan challenges conventional thinking about Li, examining how critics tried to accommodate her to cultural norms from late imperial times into the twentieth century.

Cover: Meiji Restoration Losers: Memory and Tokugawa Supporters in Modern Japan

Meiji Restoration Losers: Memory and Tokugawa Supporters in Modern Japan

Wert, Michael

This book is about the losers of the Meiji Restoration and the supporters who promoted their legacy. Using sources ranging from essays by former Tokugawa supporters like Fukuzawa Yukichi to postwar film and “lost decade” manga, Michael Wert shows how shifting portrayals of Restoration losers have influenced the formation of national history.

Cover: Facing the Monarch: Modes of Advice in the Early Chinese Court

Facing the Monarch: Modes of Advice in the Early Chinese Court

Olberding, Garret P. S.

Facing the Monarch examines the role of rhetoric in shaping the dynamic between Chinese ministers and monarchs in the era between the Spring and Autumn period and the later Han dynasty. Essays analyze classical Chinese works to provide fresh perspectives on the impact of political circumstances on modes of expression.

Cover: Modernity with a Cold War Face: Reimagining the Nation in Chinese Literature across the 1949 Divide

Modernity with a Cold War Face: Reimagining the Nation in Chinese Literature across the 1949 Divide

Wang, Xiaojue

The 1949 birth of the People’s Republic of China divided the nation into many political entities, displacing millions. Examining a body of understudied literary and cultural output in mainland China and elsewhere after World War II, Xiaojue Wang investigates how writers responded to these shifts to shape a new Chinese subjectivity in their works.

Cover: A Sense of Place: The Political Landscape in Late Medieval Japan

A Sense of Place: The Political Landscape in Late Medieval Japan

Spafford, David

A Sense of Place examines the vast Kantō region as a locus of cultural identity and an object of familial attachment in late fifteenth and early sixteenth century Japan. Using memoirs, letters, travelogues, land registers, and other documents, David Spafford analyzes the relationships of the eastern elites to the space they inhabited.

Cover: Korean Political and Economic Development: Crisis, Security, and Institutional Rebalancing

Korean Political and Economic Development: Crisis, Security, and Institutional Rebalancing

Mo, Jongryn
Weingast, Barry R.

This study offers a new view of South Korea’s transformation since 1960.Focusing on three turning points—the creation of the development state in the 1960s, democratization in 1987, and the 1997 economic crisis—Jongryn Mo and Barry R. Weingast show how Korea sustained growth by resolving crises in favor of greater political and economic openness.

Cover: The Undiscovered Country: Text, Translation, and Modernity in the Work of Yanagita Kunio

The Undiscovered Country: Text, Translation, and Modernity in the Work of Yanagita Kunio

Ortabasi, Melek

Melek Ortabasi reassesses the influence of Yanagita Kunio (1875–1962), a folk scholar and elite bureaucrat, in shaping modern Japan’s cultural identity. Only the second book-length English-language study of Yanagita, this book moves beyond his pioneering work in folk studies to reveal the full range of his contributions as a public intellectual.

Cover: Lost and Found: Recovering Regional Identity in Imperial Japan

Lost and Found: Recovering Regional Identity in Imperial Japan

Shimoda, Hiraku

Hiraku Shimoda places the origin of modern Japanese regionalism in the tense relationship between region and nation in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This study shows that “region,” often seen as a hard, natural place that impedes national unity, is in fact a supple spatial category that can be made to reinforce nationalist sensibilities.

Cover: The

The "Greatest Problem": Religion and State Formation in Meiji Japan

Maxey, Trent E.

Trent E. Maxey documents how religion came to be seen as the “greatest problem” by the architects of the modern Japanese state. Maxey shows that in Meiji Japan, religion designated a cognitive and social pluralism that resisted direct state control. It also provided the state with a means to contain, regulate, and neutralize that plurality.

Cover: The Princess Nun: Bunchi, Buddhist Reform, and Gender in Early Edo Japan

The Princess Nun: Bunchi, Buddhist Reform, and Gender in Early Edo Japan

Cogan, Gina

The first full-length biography of a premodern Japanese nun, The Princess Nun is the story of Bunchi (1619–1697), daughter of Emperor Go-Mizunoo and founder of Enshōji. The study incorporates issues of gender and social status into its discussion of Bunchi’s ascetic practice to rewrite the history of Buddhist reform and Tokugawa religion.

Cover: Rise of a Japanese Chinatown: Yokohama, 1894–1972

Rise of a Japanese Chinatown: Yokohama, 1894–1972

Han, Eric C.

Rise of a Japanese Chinatown focuses on a Chinese immigrant community in the Japanese port city of Yokohama from the Sino–Japanese War of 1894–1895 to the normalization of Sino–Japanese ties in 1972 and beyond. It tells the story of how Chinese immigrants found an enduring place within a monoethnic state during periods of war and peace.

Cover: Public Memory in Early China

Public Memory in Early China

Brashier, K. E.

K. E. Brashier examines practices of memorializing the dead in early imperial China. After surveying how learning in this period relied on memorization and recitation, he treats the parameters name, age, and kinship as ways of identifying a person in Han public memory, as well as the media responsible for preserving the deceased person’s identity.

Cover: Women and National Trauma in Late Imperial Chinese Literature

Women and National Trauma in Late Imperial Chinese Literature

Li, Wai-yee

Wai-yee Li examines the discursive space of women in seventeenth-century China. Using texts written by women or by men writing in a feminine voice, as well as writings that turn women into signifiers of lamentation or nostalgia, Li probes the emotional and psychological turmoil of the Ming–Qing transition and subsequent moments of national trauma.

Cover: The Destruction of the Medieval Chinese Aristocracy

The Destruction of the Medieval Chinese Aristocracy

Tackett, Nicolas

Historians have long been perplexed by the complete disappearance of the medieval Chinese aristocracy by the tenth century—the “great clans” that had dominated China for centuries. Nicolas Tackett resolves the enigma of their disappearance using new, digital methodologies to analyze a dazzling array of sources.

Cover: Illusory Abiding: The Cultural Construction of the Chan Monk Zhongfeng Mingben

Illusory Abiding: The Cultural Construction of the Chan Monk Zhongfeng Mingben

Heller, Natasha

Natasha Heller offers a cultural history of Buddhism through a case study of the Chan master Zhongfeng Mingben. Monks of his stature developed a broad set of cultural competencies for navigating social and intellectual relationships. Heller shows the importance of situating monks as actors within wider sociocultural fields of practice and exchange.

Cover: Sound Rising from the Paper: Nineteenth-Century Martial Arts Fiction and the Chinese Acoustic Imagination

Sound Rising from the Paper: Nineteenth-Century Martial Arts Fiction and the Chinese Acoustic Imagination

Keulemans, Paize

Chinese martial arts novels from the late nineteenth century are full of suggestive sounds. Characters curse in colorful dialect accents, and action scenes come to life with the loud clash of swords. Paize Keulemans examines the relationship between these novels and earlier storyteller manuscripts to explain the purpose and history of these sounds.

Cover: Investing Japan: Foreign Capital, Monetary Standards, and Economic Development, 1859–2011

Investing Japan: Foreign Capital, Monetary Standards, and Economic Development, 1859–2011

Bytheway, Simon James

Investing Japan demonstrates that foreign investment is a vital and misunderstood aspect of Japan’s modern economic development. This study investigates the role played by foreign companies in the Japanese experience of modernization, highlighting their identity as key agents in the processes of industrialization and technology transfer.

Cover: Negotiated Power: The State, Elites, and Local Governance in Twelfth- to Fourteenth-Century China

Negotiated Power: The State, Elites, and Local Governance in Twelfth- to Fourteenth-Century China

Lee, Sukhee

Sukhee Lee posits an alternative understanding of the relationship between the state and social elites during the Southern Song and Yuan dynasties. Challenging the assumption of a zero-sum competition between the powers of the state and of local elites, Lee shows that state power and local elite interests were mutually constitutive and reinforcing.

Cover: The Efficacious Landscape: On the Authorities of Painting at the Northern Song Court

The Efficacious Landscape: On the Authorities of Painting at the Northern Song Court

Foong, Ping

Ink landscape painting is a distinctive feature of the Northern Song, and Song painters created some of the most celebrated artworks in Chinese history. Foong Ping shows how landmark works of this era came to be identified first as potent symbols of imperial authority and later as objects by which exiled scholars expressed disaffection and dissent.

Cover: Empires on the Waterfront: Japan’s Ports and Power, 1858–1899

Empires on the Waterfront: Japan’s Ports and Power, 1858–1899

Phipps, Catherine L.

Catherine L. Phipps examines a largely unacknowledged system of “special trading ports” that operated under full Japanese jurisdiction in the shadow of the better-known treaty ports. Phipps demonstrates why the special trading ports were key to Japan’s achieving autonomy and regional power during the pivotal second half of the nineteenth century.

Cover: The Proletarian Wave: Literature and Leftist Culture in Colonial Korea, 1910–1945

The Proletarian Wave: Literature and Leftist Culture in Colonial Korea, 1910–1945

Park, Sunyoung

From the 1910s to the 1940s, a wave of anarchist, Marxist, nationalist, and feminist leftist groups swept the Korean cultural scene with differing agendas but shared demands for equality and social justice. Sunyoung Park reconstructs the complex mosaic of colonial leftist culture, focusing on literature as its most fertile and enduring expression.

Cover: The Korean Economy: From a Miraculous Past to a Sustainable Future

The Korean Economy: From a Miraculous Past to a Sustainable Future

Eichengreen, Barry
Lim, Wonhyuk
Park, Yung Chul
Perkins, Dwight H.

The Korean Economy provides an overview of Korean economic experience since the 1950s, with a focus on the period since democratization in 1987. Chapters analyze the Korean experience from a wide range of economic and social perspectives, as well as describing the country’s economic challenges going forward and how they can best be met.

Cover: Savage Exchange: Han Imperialism, Chinese Literary Style, and the Economic Imagination

Savage Exchange: Han Imperialism, Chinese Literary Style, and the Economic Imagination

Chin, Tamara T.

Tamara T. Chin explores the politics of representation during the Han dynasty at a pivotal moment when China was asserting imperialist power on the Eurasian continent and expanding its local and long-distance (“Silk Road”) markets. Chin explains why rival political groups introduced new literary forms with which to represent these expanded markets.

Cover: Shifting Stories: History, Gossip, and Lore in Narratives from Tang Dynasty China

Shifting Stories: History, Gossip, and Lore in Narratives from Tang Dynasty China

Allen, Sarah M.

Sarah M. Allen explores the tale literature of eighth- and ninth-century China to show how written tales of the Tang canon we know today grew out of a fluid culture of hearsay in elite society. The book focuses on two main types of tales, those based in gossip about recognizable public figures and those developed out of lore concerning the occult.

Cover: Real and Imagined: The Peak of Gold in Heian Japan

Real and Imagined: The Peak of Gold in Heian Japan

Blair, Heather

During the Heian period, the sacred mountain Kinpusen came to cultural prominence as a pilgrimage site for the most powerful men in Japan, but these journeys also had political implications. Using a myriad of sources, Heather Blair sheds new light on Kinpusen, positioning it within the broader religious and political history of the Heian period.

Cover: Significant Soil: Settler Colonialism and Japan's Urban Empire in Manchuria

Significant Soil: Settler Colonialism and Japan's Urban Empire in Manchuria

O’Dwyer, Emer

Focusing on Japan’s Kwantung Leasehold and Railway Zone in China’s northeastern provinces, Emer O’Dwyer traces the history of Japan’s prewar Manchurian empire over four decades to show how South Manchuria was naturalized as a Japanese space and how this process contributed to the success of the Japanese army’s early 1930s takeover of Manchuria.

Cover: Under the Ancestors' Eyes: Kinship, Status, and Locality in Premodern Korea

Under the Ancestors' Eyes: Kinship, Status, and Locality in Premodern Korea

Deuchler, Martina

Under the Ancestors’ Eyes elucidates the role of Neo-Confucianism as an ideological and political device by which the elite in Korea regained and maintained dominance during the Chosŏn period. Using historical and social anthropological methodology, Martina Deuchler highlights Korea’s distinctive elevation of the social over the political.

Cover: Writing, Publishing, and Reading Local Gazetteers in Imperial China, 1100-1700

Writing, Publishing, and Reading Local Gazetteers in Imperial China, 1100-1700

Dennis, Joseph R.

Joseph R. Dennis demonstrates the significance of imperial Chinese local gazetteers in both local societies and national discourses. Whereas previous studies argued that publishing, and thus cultural and intellectual power, were concentrated in the southeast, Dennis shows that publishing and book ownership were widely dispersed throughout China.

Cover: The Chinese Political Novel: Migration of a World Genre

The Chinese Political Novel: Migration of a World Genre

Yeh, Catherine Vance

Focusing on its adaptation in the Chinese context, Catherine Vance Yeh traces the rise of the political novel to international renown between the 1830s and the 1910s. Yeh explores in detail the tensions characteristic of transcultural processes, among them the dynamics through which a particular, and seemingly local, literary genre goes global.

Cover: Defensive Positions: The Politics of Maritime Security in Tokugawa Japan

Defensive Positions: The Politics of Maritime Security in Tokugawa Japan

Wilson, Noell

In Defensive Positions, Noell Wilson shows how control of coastal defense by regional domains exacerbated the shogunate’s inability to respond to major military and political challenges as Japan transitioned from an early modern system of parcelized, local maritime defense to one of centralized, national security in the nineteenth century.

Cover: Monstrous Bodies: The Rise of the Uncanny in Modern Japan

Monstrous Bodies: The Rise of the Uncanny in Modern Japan

Nakamura, Miri

Miri Nakamura examines bodily metaphors such as doppelgangers and robots that were ubiquitous in the literature of imperial Japan. Reading them against the historical rise of the Japanese empire, she argues they must be understood in relation to the most “monstrous” body of all in modern Japan: the carefully constructed image of the empire itself.

Cover: Radical Inequalities: China's Revolutionary Welfare State in Comparative Perspective

Radical Inequalities: China's Revolutionary Welfare State in Comparative Perspective

Dillon, Nara

The Chinese Communist welfare state was established with the goal of eradicating income inequality. Paradoxically, it widened that gap, undermining a primary objective of Mao Zedong’s revolution. Nara Dillon traces the origins of the Chinese welfare state from the 1940s to the 1960s to uncover the reasons why the state failed to achieve this goal.

Cover: One Who Knows Me: Friendship and Literary Culture in Mid-Tang China

One Who Knows Me: Friendship and Literary Culture in Mid-Tang China

Shields, Anna M.

Friendships between writers of the mid-Tang era became famous through the many texts they wrote to and about one another. Anna M. Shields explores these texts to reveal the complex value the writers found in friendship—as a rewarding social practice, a rich literary topic, a way to negotiate literati identity, and a path toward self-understanding.

Cover: Materializing Magic Power: Chinese Popular Religion in Villages and Cities

Materializing Magic Power: Chinese Popular Religion in Villages and Cities

Lin, Wei-Ping

Through an exploration of contemporary Chinese popular religion from its cultural, social, and material perspectives, Wei-Ping Lin paints a broad picture of the dynamics of popular religion in Taiwan. Analyzing these aspects of religious practice in a unified framework, she traces their transformation as adherents move from villages to cities.

Cover: Traces of Grand Peace: Classics and State Activism in Imperial China

Traces of Grand Peace: Classics and State Activism in Imperial China

Song, Jaeyoon

In Northern Song China, reform-minded statesmen sought to remove the tension between the Confucian Classics and statist ideals of “big government.” Jaeyoon Song illuminates the interplay between classics, thinkers, and government in statist reform, and explains why the uneasy marriage of classics and state activism had to fail in imperial China.

Cover: Fiction's Family: Zhan Xi, Zhan Kai, and the Business of Women in Late-Qing China

Fiction's Family: Zhan Xi, Zhan Kai, and the Business of Women in Late-Qing China

Widmer, Ellen

Ellen Widmer examines the writings of a literary family whose works embodied shifting attitudes toward women in late Qing China. She illuminates the diachronic bridge between the late Qing and the preceding period, the synchronic interplay of genres during the family’s lifetimes, and the interaction of Shanghai publishing with other regions.

Cover: Runaway Wives, Urban Crimes, and Survival Tactics in Wartime Beijing, 1937–1949

Runaway Wives, Urban Crimes, and Survival Tactics in Wartime Beijing, 1937–1949

Ma, Zhao

Zhao Ma explores lower-class women’s struggles with poverty, deprivation, and marital strife in Beijing from 1937 to 1949. He shows how the everyday survival tactics they devised allowed them to subtly deflect, subvert, and “escape without leaving” powerful forces such as the surveillance state, reformist discourse, and revolutionary politics.

Cover: Young China: National Rejuvenation and the Bildungsroman, 1900–1959

Young China: National Rejuvenation and the Bildungsroman, 1900–1959

Song, Mingwei

Since the last years of the Qing dynasty, youth has been made a new agent of history in Chinese intellectuals’ visions of national rejuvenation. Mingwei Song combines historical investigations of the origin and development of the modern Chinese youth discourse with close analyses of the novelistic construction of the Chinese Bildungsroman.

Cover: Voice, Silence, and Self: Negotiations of Buraku Identity in Contemporary Japan

Voice, Silence, and Self: Negotiations of Buraku Identity in Contemporary Japan

Bondy, Christopher

Stigmatized throughout Japanese history as outcastes, the burakumin are contemporary Japan’s largest minority. In this study of youths from two different communities, Christopher Bondy explores how individuals navigate their social world, demonstrating the ways in which people make conscious decisions about disclosing a stigmatized identity.

Cover: Writing Technology in Meiji Japan: A Media History of Modern Japanese Literature and Visual Culture

Writing Technology in Meiji Japan: A Media History of Modern Japanese Literature and Visual Culture

Jacobowitz, Seth

Seth Jacobowitz rethinks the origins of modern Japanese language, literature, and visual culture, presenting the first systematic study of the ways that media and inscriptive technologies available in Japan at its threshold of modernization in the late nineteenth to early twentieth century shaped and brought into being modern Japanese literature.

Cover: Information, Territory, and Networks: The Crisis and Maintenance of Empire in Song China

Information, Territory, and Networks: The Crisis and Maintenance of Empire in Song China

De Weerdt, Hilde

By the late eleventh century the Song court no longer dominated production of information about itself. Hilde De Weert demonstrates how the growing involvement of the literati in publishing such information altered the relationship between court and literati in political communication for the remainder of the Chinese imperial period.

Cover: Geo-Narratives of a Filial Son: The Paintings and Travel Diaries of Huang Xiangjian (1609–1673)

Geo-Narratives of a Filial Son: The Paintings and Travel Diaries of Huang Xiangjian (1609–1673)

Kindall, Elizabeth

Elizabeth Kindall’s definitive study elucidates the context for the paintings of Huang Xiangjian (1609–1673) and identifies geo-narrative as a distinct landscape-painting tradition lauded for its naturalistic immediacy, experiential topography, and dramatic narratives of moral persuasion, class identification, and biographical commemoration.

Cover: Chinese History: A New Manual, Fourth Edition

Chinese History: A New Manual, Fourth Edition

Wilkinson, Endymion

This thoroughly updated fourth edition of Endymion Wilkinson’s bestselling Chinese History: A New Manual introduces students to various transmitted, excavated, and artifactual sources from prehistory to the twenty-first century. It also examines those sources’ originating contexts, and the associated problems of interpreting them.

Cover: Assembling Shinto: Buddhist Approaches to Kami Worship in Medieval Japan

Assembling Shinto: Buddhist Approaches to Kami Worship in Medieval Japan

Andreeva, Anna

Anna Andreeva challenges the twentieth-century narrative of Shinto as an unbroken, monolithic tradition. By studying how and why religious practitioners affiliated with different religious institutions responded to esoteric Buddhism’s teachings, this book demonstrates that kami worship in medieval Japan was a result of complex negotiations.

Cover: No Great Wall: Trade, Tariffs, and Nationalism in Republican China, 1927–1945

No Great Wall: Trade, Tariffs, and Nationalism in Republican China, 1927–1945

Boecking, Felix

In this in-depth study, Felix Boecking challenges the widely accepted idea that the key to Communist seizure of power in China lay in the incompetence of Chiang Kai-shek’s Nationalist government. It argues instead that international trade, government tariff revenues, and hence China’s fiscal policy and state-making project all collapsed.

Cover: Itineraries of Power: Texts and Traversals in Heian and Medieval Japan

Itineraries of Power: Texts and Traversals in Heian and Medieval Japan

Kawashima, Terry

Movements of people—through migration, exile, and diaspora—are central to understanding power relationships in Japan 900–1400. But what of more literary moves: texts with abrupt genre leaps or poetic figures that flatten distances? Terry Kawashima examines what happens when both types of tropes—literal travels and literary shifts—coexist.

Cover: Transgressive Typologies: Constructions of Gender and Power in Early Tang China

Transgressive Typologies: Constructions of Gender and Power in Early Tang China

Doran, Rebecca

Rebecca Doran offers a new understanding of major female figures of the Tang era—including Wu Zhao, Empress Wei, and Shangguan Wan’er—within their literary-historical contexts, and delves into critical questions about the relationship between Chinese historiography, reception-history, and the process of image-making and cultural construction.

Cover: Li Mengyang, the North-South Divide, and Literati Learning in Ming China

Li Mengyang, the North-South Divide, and Literati Learning in Ming China

Ong, Chang Woei

Li Mengyang (1473–1530) was a scholar-official who initiated the literary archaist movement that sought to restore ancient styles of prose and poetry in sixteenth-century China. Chang Woei Ong situates Li’s quest to redefine literati learning as a way to build a perfect social order in the context of intellectual transitions since the Song dynasty.

Cover: Celestial Masters: History and Ritual in Early Daoist Communities

Celestial Masters: History and Ritual in Early Daoist Communities

Kleeman, Terry F.

Celestial Masters is the first book in any Western language devoted solely to the founding of Daoism. It traces the movement from the mid-second century CE through the sixth century, and provides a detailed analysis of ritual life within the movement, covering the roles of common believer or Daoist citizen, novice, and priest or libationer.

Cover: After the Prosperous Age: State and Elites in Early Nineteenth-Century Suzhou

After the Prosperous Age: State and Elites in Early Nineteenth-Century Suzhou

Han, Seunghyun

Scholars have described the eighteenth century in China as a time of “state activism” and often associate the Taiping Rebellion and postbellum restoration efforts with the origins of elite activism. Seunghyun Han, however, argues that the ascendance of elite activism can be traced to the Jiaqing and Daoguang reigns in the early nineteenth century.

Cover: Honored and Dishonored Guests: Westerners in Wartime Japan

Honored and Dishonored Guests: Westerners in Wartime Japan

Brecher, W. Puck

W. Puck Brecher overturns standard narratives of wartime Japan’s racial attitudes, focusing on the experiences of Western civilians rather than enemy POWs in Japan. His bold thesis is borne out by a broad mosaic of stories of police harassment, suspicion, relocation, starvation, internment, and torture, as well as extraordinary acts of charity.

Cover: Osaka Modern: The City in the Japanese Imaginary

Osaka Modern: The City in the Japanese Imaginary

Cronin, Michael P.

Japan’s “merchant capital” in the late sixteenth century, Osaka remained an industrial center into the 1930s, developing a distinct urban culture to rival Tokyo’s. Osaka Modern maps the city as imagined in Japanese popular literature and cinema—as well as contemporary radio, television, music, and comedy—from the 1920s to the 1950s.

Cover: Aesthetic Life: Beauty and Art in Modern Japan

Aesthetic Life: Beauty and Art in Modern Japan

Lippit, Miya Elise Mizuta

Aesthetic Life is a study of modern Japan, engaging the fields of art history, literature, and cultural studies, seeking to understand how the “beautiful woman” (bijin) emerged as a symbol of Japanese culture during the Meiji period (1868–1912).

Cover: Chinese Literary Forms in Heian Japan: Poetics and Practice

Chinese Literary Forms in Heian Japan: Poetics and Practice

Steininger, Brian

Brian Steininger revisits Japan’s mid-Heian court of the Tale of Genji and the Pillow Book, where literary Chinese was not only the basis of official administration, but also a medium for political protest, sermons of mourning, and poems of celebration.

Cover: A Passage to China: Literature, Loyalism, and Colonial Taiwan

A Passage to China: Literature, Loyalism, and Colonial Taiwan

Tsai, Chien-hsin

Chien-hsin Tsai examines the reinvention of loyalism in colonial Taiwan through the lens of literature. He analyzes the ways in which writers from colonial Taiwan—including Qiu Fengjia, Lian Heng, and Wu Zhuoliu—creatively and selectively employed loyalist ideals to cope with Japanese colonialism and its many institutional changes.

Cover: Making History Matter: Kuroita Katsumi and the Construction of Imperial Japan

Making History Matter: Kuroita Katsumi and the Construction of Imperial Japan

Yoshikawa, Lisa

Lisa Yoshikawa explores the role history and historians played in imperial Japan’s nation and empire building from the 1890s to the 1930s. Through a close reading of vast, multilingual sources, Yoshikawa argues that scholarship and politics were inseparable as Japan’s historical profession developed.

Cover: Bannermen Tales (Zidishu): Manchu Storytelling and Cultural Hybridity in the Qing Dynasty

Bannermen Tales (Zidishu): Manchu Storytelling and Cultural Hybridity in the Qing Dynasty

Chiu, Elena Suet-Ying

Bannermen Tales is the first book in English to offer a comprehensive study of zidishu—a popular storytelling genre created by the Manchus in early eighteenth-century Beijing. With original translations, musical score, and numerous illustrations of hand-copied and printed texts, this study opens a new window into Qing literature.

Cover: Upriver Journeys: Diaspora and Empire in Southern China, 1570–1850

Upriver Journeys: Diaspora and Empire in Southern China, 1570–1850

Miles, Steven B.

Tracing journeys of Cantonese migrants along the West River and its tributaries, Steven B. Miles describes the circulation of people through one of the world’s great river systems between the late sixteenth and mid-nineteenth centuries.

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Capitalism and Its Discontents [picture of the ruins of a house]