RUSSIAN RESEARCH CENTER STUDIES
Cover: Authenticity and Fiction in the Russian Literary Journey, 1790-1840 in HARDCOVER

Russian Research Center Studies 92

Authenticity and Fiction in the Russian Literary Journey, 1790-1840

Add to Cart

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$81.50 • £65.95 • €73.50

ISBN 9780674002326

Publication Date: 07/14/2000

Short

304 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

1 halftone

Russian Research Center Studies

World

This comprehensive study of the Russian literary travelogue, a genre that blossomed in the early nineteenth century, sheds new light on Russian literature and culture of the period.

In the decades before and during the rise of the Russian novel, a new form of prose writing took hold in Russia: travel accounts, often fictional, marked by a fully developed narrator’s voice, interpretive impressions, scenic descriptions, and extended narrative. Prompted in part by the growth of leisure travel and in part by publication of Western European examples of travel writing, the genre attracted the talents of numerous writers, including Radishchev, Karamzin, and Pushkin. In illuminating analyses of major texts as well as lesser known but influential works, Andreas Schönle surveys the literary travelogue from its emergence in Russia to the end of the Romantic era. His study offers new insight on the construction of the authorial persona and on the emergence of fiction in a culture that valued nonfiction writing.

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket: Memory Speaks: On Losing and Reclaiming Language and Self, by Julie Sedivy, from Harvard University Press

Lost in Translation: Reclaiming Lost Language

In Memory Speaks: On Losing and Reclaiming Language and Self, Julie Sedivy sets out to understand the science of language loss and the potential for renewal. Sedivy takes on the psychological and social world of multilingualism, exploring the human brain’s capacity to learn—and forget—languages at various stages of life. She argues that the struggle to remain connected to an ancestral language and culture is a site of common ground: people from all backgrounds can recognize the crucial role of language in forming a sense of self.