ADAMS FAMILY CORRESPONDENCE
Cover: Adams Family Correspondence, Volume 1 and 2 in HARDCOVER

Adams Family Correspondence, Volume 1 and 2

December 1761 – March 1778

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$312.00 • £249.95 • €281.00

ISBN 9780674004009

Publication Date: 01/01/1963

Short

  • Volume I
    • Descriptive List of Illustrations*
    • Introduction
      • 1. A General View of the Adams Family Correspondence
      • 2. Sources
      • 3. Previous Use and Publication
      • 4. The Editorial Method
    • Acknowledgments
    • Guide to Editorial Apparatus
      • 1. Textual Devices
      • 2. Adams Family Code Names
      • 3. Descriptive Symbols
      • 4. Location Symbols
      • 5. Other Abbreviations and Conventional Terms
      • 6. Short Titles of Works Frequently Cited
    • Family Correspondence, December 1761–May 1776
    • Addendum: Abigail Adams to Mercy Otis Warren, January? 1776
  • Volume II
    • Descriptive List of Illustrations**
    • Guide to Editorial Apparatus
      • 1. Textual Devices [in vol. I]
      • 2. Adams Family Code Names [in vol. I]
      • 3. Descriptive Symbols [in vol. I]
      • 4. Location Symbols
      • 5. Other Abbreviations and Conventional Terms
      • 6. Short Titles of Works Frequently Cited
    • Family Correspondence, June 1776–March 1778
    • Index
  • * Illustrations, Volume I:
    • 1. Abigail Adams’ Birthplace in Weymouth
    • 2. Colonel Josiah Quincy’s House in 1822, by Eliza Susan Quincy
    • 3. List of Addressers “To the Late Governor Hutchinson,” Broadside, June 1744
    • 4. The Reverend William Smith, Father of Abigail Adams
    • 5. Richard Cranch, Abigail Adams’ Brother-in-Law
    • 6. Mrs. Catharine Macaulay, the Historian
    • 7. Mrs. Mercy Otis Warren, about 1765, by John Singleton Copley
    • 8. Map of Boston and Vicinity during the Siege, 1775–1776
    • 9. Chart of Boston Harbor in 1775
    • 10. John Adams’ Copy of Matthew Robinson-Morris’ “Considerations,” 1774
    • 11. John Adams’ Copy of Thomas Paine’s “Common Sense,” 1776
  • ** Illustrations, Volume II:
    • 1. Trade Card of John Adams’ Philadelphia Stationer
    • 2. “Yesterday the greatest question was decided”
    • 3. The Billopp House, Staten Island
    • 4. The Howes’ Reconciliation Broadside
    • 5. The “Choice of Hercules,” Proposed by John Adams for the Great Seal
    • 6. John Adams’ Plan for a Military Establishment in 1776
    • 7. Isaac Smith Sr. in 1769, by John Singleton Copley
    • 8. Dr. Cotton Tufts in 1804, by Benjamin Greenleaf
    • 9. James Lovell’s Map of the “Seat of War” in the Fall of 1777
    • 10. “The loss of your company…I consider as a loss of so much solid happiness”
    • 11. “I keep up some spirits yet, tho I would have you prepaird for any event that may happen”
    • 12. Some Books the Adamses Read during the Revolution

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