Cover: Justice as Fairness: A Restatement, from Harvard University PressCover: Justice as Fairness in PAPERBACK

Justice as Fairness

A Restatement

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$34.00 • £27.95 • €30.50

ISBN 9780674005112

Publication Date: 05/16/2001

Short

240 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

2 line illustrations

Belknap Press

World

  • Editor’s Foreword
  • Preface
  • I. Fundamental Ideas
    • 1. Four Roles of Political Philosophy
    • 2. Society as a Fair System of Cooperation
    • 3. The Idea of a Well-Ordered Society
    • 4. The Idea of a Basic Structure
    • 5. Limits to Our Inquiry
    • 6. The Idea of the Original Position
    • 7. The Idea of Free and Equal Persons
    • 8. Relations between the Fundamental Ideas
    • 9. The Idea of Public Justification
    • 10. The Idea of Reflective Equilibrium
    • 11. The Idea of an Overlapping Consensus
  • II. Principles of Justice
    • 12. Three Basic Points
    • 13. Two Principles of Justice
    • 14. The Problem of Distributive Justice
    • 15. The Basic Structure as Subject: First Kind of Reason
    • 16. The Basic Structure as Subject: Second Kind of Reason
    • 17. Who Are the Least Advantaged?
    • 18. The Difference Principle: Its Meaning
    • 19. Objections via Counterexamples
    • 20. Legitimate Expectations, Entitlement, and Desert
    • 21. On Viewing Native Endowments as a Common Asset
    • 22. Summary Comments on Distributive Justice and Desert
  • III. The Argument from the Original Position
    • 23. The Original Position: The Set-Up
    • 24. The Circumstances of Justice
    • 25. Formal Constrains and the Veil of Ignorance
    • 26. The Idea of Public Reason
    • 27. First Fundamental Comparison
    • 28. The Structure of the Argument and the Maximum Rule
    • 29. The Argument Stressing the Third Condition
    • 30. The Priority of the Basic Liberties
    • 31. An Objection about Aversion to Uncertainty
    • 32. The Equal Basic Liberties Revisited
    • 33. The Argument Stressing the Second Condition
    • 34. Second Fundamental Comparison: Introduction
    • 35. Grounds Falling under Publicity
    • 36. Grounds Falling under Reciprocity
    • 37. Grounds Falling under Stability
    • 38. Grounds against the Principle of Restricted Utility
    • 39. Comments on Equality
    • 40. Concluding Remarks
  • IV. Institutions of a Just Basic Structure
    • 41. Property-Owning Democracy: Introductory Remarks
    • 42. Some Basic Contrasts between Regimes
    • 43. Ideas of the Good in Justice as Fairness
    • 44. Constitutional versus Procedural Democracy
    • 45. The Fair Value of the Equal Political Liberties
    • 46. Denial of the Fair Value for Other Basic Liberties
    • 47. Political and Comprehensive Liberalism: A Contrast
    • 48. A Note on Head Taxes and the Priority of Liberty
    • 49. Economic Institutions of a Property-Owning Democracy
    • 50. The Family as a Basic Institution
    • 51. The Flexibility of an Index of Primary Goods
    • 52. Addressing Marx’s Critique of Liberalism
    • 53. Brief Comments on Leisure Time
  • V. The Question of Stability
    • 54. The Domain of the Political
    • 55. The Question of Stability
    • 56. Is Justice as Fairness Political in the Wrong Way?
    • 57. How Is Political Liberalism Possible?
    • 58. An Overlapping Consensus Not Utopian
    • 59. A Reasonable Moral Psychology
    • 60. The Good of Political Society
  • Index

Awards & Accolades

  • John Rawls Is a 1999 National Humanities Medal Winner
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