HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: Competing Discourses: Orthodoxy, Authenticity, and Engendered Meanings in Late Imperial Chinese Fiction, from Harvard University PressCover: Competing Discourses in HARDCOVER

Harvard East Asian Monographs 197

Competing Discourses

Orthodoxy, Authenticity, and Engendered Meanings in Late Imperial Chinese Fiction

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$39.50 • £31.95 • €35.50

ISBN 9780674005129

Publication Date: 06/01/2001

Short

6 x 9 inches

Harvard University Asia Center > Harvard East Asian Monographs

World, subsidiary rights restricted

In the traditional Chinese symbolic vocabulary, the construction of gender was never far from debates about ritual propriety, desire, and even cosmic harmony. Competing Discourses maps the aesthetic and semantic meanings associated with gender in the Ming–Qing vernacular novel through close readings of five long narratives: Marriage Bonds to Awaken the World, Dream of the Red Chamber, A Country Codger’s Words of Exposure, Flowers in the Mirror, and A Tale of Heroic Lovers.

Maram Epstein argues that the authors of these novels manipulated gendered terms to achieve structural coherence. These patterns are, however, frequently at odds with other gendered structures in the texts, and authors exploited these conflicts to discuss the problem of orthodox behavior versus the cult of feeling.

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