Cover: Instruments of Desire: The Electric Guitar and the Shaping of Musical Experience, from Harvard University PressCover: Instruments of Desire in PAPERBACK

Instruments of Desire

The Electric Guitar and the Shaping of Musical Experience

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$17.50 • £14.95 • €16.00

ISBN 9780674005471

Publication Date: 05/02/2001

Academic Trade

384 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

23 halftones

World

  • Illustrations
  • Introduction: Going Electric
  • Playing with Sound: Charlie Christian, the Electric Guitar and the Swing Era
  • Pure Tones and Solid Bodies: Les Paul’s New Sound
  • Mister Guitar: Chet Atkins and the Nashville Sound
  • Racial Distortions: Muddy Waters, Chuck Berry and the Electric Guitar in Black Popular Music
  • Black Sound, Black Body: Jimi Hendrix, the Electric Guitar and the Meanings of Blackness
  • Kick Out the Jams! The MC5 and the Politics of Noise
  • Heavy Music: Cock Rock, Colonialism, and Led Zeppelin
  • Conclusion: Time Machine
  • Adventures in Sound: A Guide to Listening
  • Discography: Selected Recordings
  • Notes
  • Credits
  • Index

Awards & Accolades

  • Runner-Up, 1998 Woodie Guthrie Award, U.S. Branch of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music
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