Cover: Semblances of Sovereignty: The Constitution, the State, and American Citizenship, from Harvard University PressCover: Semblances of Sovereignty in HARDCOVER

Semblances of Sovereignty

The Constitution, the State, and American Citizenship

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$85.00 • £68.95 • €76.50

ISBN 9780674007451

Publication Date: 05/30/2002

Short

320 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

World

Aleinikoff examines sovereignty, citizenship, and the broader concept of membership (aliens as well as citizens) in the American nation-state and suggests that American constitutional law needs ‘understandings of sovereignty and membership that are supple and flexible, open to new arrangements’… Sure to generate heated debate over the extent to which the rules governing immigration, Indian tribes, and American territories should be altered, this book is required reading for constitutional scholars.—R. J. Steamer, Choice

This book not only provides careful analysis of U.S. Supreme Court and congressional relationships but also could lead to novel studies of rights and obligations in American society. Highly recommended.—Steven Puro, Library Journal

What lends Aleinikoff’s work originality and importance is its synthetic range and the new insights that flow from bringing immigration, Indian, and territorial issues together, and taking on such much-criticized anomalies as the plenary power doctrine in their full ambit. In my view, he may well make good on his hope of helping to inspire a new field of sovereignty studies. Certainly, the idea of ‘problematizing’ national citizenship and national sovereignty is afoot in the law schools and, far more so, in sociology, political science, and in various interdisciplinary fields like American Studies, regional studies, and global political economy and cultural studies. To my knowledge, no one has written a synthetic treatment of these issues that compares with Aleinikoff’s in its mastery of constitutional law, its working knowledge or adjacent normative, historical and policy studies, and its intellectual clarity, stylistic grace, and morally sensitive but pragmatic political judgments.—William Forbath, University of Texas at Austin Law School

Amid the overflowing scholarship on American constitutional law, little has been written on this cluster of topics, which go to the core of what sovereignty under the Constitution means. Aleinikoff asks not only how we define ‘ourselves,’ but exactly who is authorized to place themselves in the category of insiders empowered to set limits excluding others. The book stands out as a novel, intriguing, and interesting analysis against the sea of sameness found in the constitutional literature.—Philip P. Frickey, University of California, Berkeley, School of Law

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