Cover: Mad Travelers: Reflections on the Reality of Transient Mental Illnesses, from Harvard University PressCover: Mad Travelers in PAPERBACK

Mad Travelers

Reflections on the Reality of Transient Mental Illnesses

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$30.00 • £24.95 • €27.00

ISBN 9780674009547

Publication Date: 11/30/2002

Academic Trade

256 pages

6 x 9 inches

4 halftones, 2 line illustrations

Not for sale in UK & British Commonwealth (except Canada)

Ian Hacking tells the fascinating tale of Albert Dadas, a native of France’s Bordeaux region and the first diagnosed mad traveler. Dadas suffered from a strange compulsion that led him to travel obsessively, often without identification, not knowing who he was or why he traveled. Using the records of Philippe Tissié, Dadas’s physician, Hacking attempts to make sense of this strange epidemic.

In telling this tale, Hacking raises probing questions about the nature of mental disorders, the cultural repercussions of their diagnosis, and the relevance of this century-old case study for today’s overanalyzed society.

Awards & Accolades

  • Ian Hacking Is Winner of the 2009 Holberg International Memorial Prize
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