THE EDWIN O. REISCHAUER LECTURES
Cover: The Chinese Overseas: From Earthbound China to the Quest for Autonomy, from Harvard University PressCover: The Chinese Overseas in PAPERBACK

The Chinese Overseas

From Earthbound China to the Quest for Autonomy

Add to Cart

Product Details

PAPERBACK

$30.00 • £24.95 • €27.00

ISBN 9780674009868

Publication Date: 09/30/2002

Short

The style and scholarship is what we have come to expect from Professor Wang: lucid, comprehensive and extremely well-informed…the lectures will actually prove very useful as introductory reading on the overseas Chinese… It will…prove rather difficult to find other up-to-date reading quite so well written, concise and comprehensive as this book, and we should be grateful to Professor Wang for having taken the time to write it.—Frank N. Pieke, Asian Affairs

Readers familiar with Wang Gungwu’s many works on Chinese migration will particularly welcome his general survey of the entire migratory experience… It goes well beyond the Chinese diaspora by using the overseas Chinese experience to make original comparisons between the historical experiences of China and the maritime West. It also offers a new and hitherto overlooked perspective for understanding the development of China itself over two millenia… This work ranges over great themes of world history… Wang’s beautifully written book will have broad appeal to readers in many fields and in many parallel quests for autonomy.—Philip A. Kuhn, China Journal

Provides a broad overview of the two-thousand-year history of Chinese attempts to venture abroad and the underlying values affecting migration.Journal of Economic Literature

These essays represent the culmination of a lifetime’s worth of research and analysis by a very mature and cosmopolitan scholar. The book has a sweeping quality of grand analysis, written in his usual graceful and compelling, yet easily accessible, style. Wang provokes us all to think about the issue of the fate and state of overseas Chinese wherever they may be, however they got there, and whatever their future may hold. He has indeed problematized the history and sociology of the formation of Chinese communities outside China.—Evelyn Hu-DeHart, University of Colorado at Boulder

Original integrative work by a leading scholar in an important field of study. It is something entirely new: nobody has undertaken a broad overview of this subject in English, and none that I know of in other languages has achieved anything near Wang’s level of inner knowledge and sophistication. The Chinese Overseas is squarely in the emerging fields of diaspora and transnational studies. But it goes well beyond these fashionable specialties by using the overseas Chinese experience to make original comparisons between the modern histories of China and the maritime West. In other words, Wang offers a new and hitherto overlooked setting for understanding China and its history over the past two millennia. Great themes of contemporary global history are illuminated by this book: the coming together of Asian and European civilizations, the role of middleman minorities, the ambiguities of ethnicity and of diasporic consciousness, and the tension between culture-maintenance and assimilation. An original work that readers in many fields will find important and stimulating.—Philip A. Kuhn, Harvard University

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket: Atomic Doctors: Conscience and Complicity at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age, by James L. Nolan, Jr., from Harvard University Press

Remembering Hiroshima

On this day 75 years ago, the United States dropped the world’s first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. James L. Nolan Jr.’s grandfather was a doctor who participated in the Manhattan Project, and he writes about him in Atomic Doctors: Conscience and Complicity at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age, an unflinching examination of the moral and professional dilemmas faced by physicians who took part in the project. Below, please find the introduction to Nolan’s book. On the morning of June 17, 1945, Captain James F. Nolan, MD, boarded a plane