Cover: Jump Jim Crow: Lost Plays, Lyrics, and Street Prose of the First Atlantic Popular Culture, from Harvard University PressCover: Jump Jim Crow in HARDCOVER

Jump Jim Crow

Lost Plays, Lyrics, and Street Prose of the First Atlantic Popular Culture

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$79.00 • £63.95 • €71.00

ISBN 9780674010628

Publication Date: 07/31/2003

Short

478 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

8 halftones

World

  • Preface
  • List of Illustrations
  • Introduction: An Extravagant and Wheeling Stranger
    • Lateral Sufficiency
    • Gumbo Cuff and the New York Desdemonas
    • Change the Joke and Slip the Stereotype
    • The Phases of Jim Crow’s Runaway Stage
  • Songs
    • “Coal Black Rose”
    • “The Original Jim Crow”
    • “Jim Crow, Still Alive!!!”
    • “Dinah Crow”
    • “Jim Crow" (London)
    • “De Original Jim Crow”
    • “Jim Crow" (Boston)
    • “All de Women Shout Loo! Loo!”
    • “Clare de Kitchen”
    • “Gombo Chaff”
    • “Sich a Gitting Up Stairs”
    • “Jim Crack Corn, or the Blue Tail Fly”
    • “Settin’ on a Rail, or, Racoon Hunt”
  • Plays
    • Oh! Hush! or, The Virginny Cupids!
    • Virginia Mummy
    • Bone Squash
    • Flight to America
    • The Peacock and the Crow
    • Jim Crow in His New Place
    • The Foreign Prince
    • Yankee Notes for English Circulation
    • Otello
  • Street Prose
    • “Life of Jim Crow”
    • “A Faithful Account of the Life of Jim Crow the American Negro Poet”
  • Notes
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index

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