Cover: Arnold Schoenberg’s Journey, from Harvard University PressCover: Arnold Schoenberg’s Journey in PAPERBACK

Arnold Schoenberg’s Journey

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$33.00 • £26.95 • €29.50

ISBN 9780674011014

Publication Date: 05/30/2003

Short

368 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

22 halftones, 2 line illustrations, 124 musical examples

World

  • Foreword
  • Introduction: Six Little Piano Pieces
  • Bridge Passage, 1874–1908
    • 1. First Loves
    • 2. Transfigured Night
    • 3. Dawn: The Gurre-Lieder
    • 4. Berlin Cabaret
    • 5. Coming Apart
    • 6. An Inner Compulsion
  • A New Form of Expression, 1909–13
    • 7. Farben
    • 8. Listening to Five Pieces for Orchestra
    • 9. Paths to (and in) Erwartung
    • 10. Wrong Notes
    • 11. Six Little Pieces
    • 12. Theory of Harmony
    • 13. Pierrot
    • 14. Die glückliche Hand
  • Silence, Order, and Terror, 1914–33
    • 15. Incident at Mattsee
    • 16. Critics and Disciples
    • 17. A Clearing in the Forest: Twelve-Tone Music
    • 18. Satires
    • 19. Catastrophe
    • 20. Moses and Arnold
  • America, 1933–51
    • 21. Exodus
    • 22. 1940: Stravinsky and Schoenberg
    • 23. Games
    • 24. On Being Short
    • 25. Piano Concerto
    • 26. Death and Rebirth
    • 27. Seventy-fifth Birthday
  • Afterlife
    • 28. Death and Rebirth II
    • 29. Writings about Schoenberg
    • 30. Last Notes: Portrait in Retrograde
  • Suggested Readings
  • Notes
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index

Awards & Accolades

  • 2003 ASCAP Deems Taylor Award, Concert Music Books Category, American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers
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