SERIES ON LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
Cover: Proclaiming Revolution in PAPERBACK

Series on Latin American Studies 10

Proclaiming Revolution

Bolivia in Comparative Perspective

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$24.95 • £19.95 • €22.50

ISBN 9780674011410

Publication Date: 10/15/2003

Short

448 pages

6 x 9 inches

17 line illustrations, 23 tables

David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies > Series on Latin American Studies

World

In 1952 Bolivia was transformed by revolution. With the army destroyed from only a few days of fighting, workers and peasants took up arms to claim the country as their own. Overnight, the electorate expanded five-fold. Industries were turned over to worker organizations to manage, and land was distributed to peasant communities. Education became universal and free for the first time in the country’s history.

This volume, the result of a conference organized by the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies of Harvard University and the Institute for Latin American Studies at the University of London, presents new interpretations of the causes of the events of 1952 and compares them to the great social transformations that occurred in France, Mexico, Russia, China, and Cuba. It also considers the consequences of the revolution by examining the political, social, and economic development of the country, as well as adding important insights to the analysis of revolution and the understanding of this fascinating Andean country.

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