HARVARD ORIENTAL SERIES
Cover: Early Tamil Epigraphy from the Earliest Times to the Sixth Century A.D. in HARDCOVER

Harvard Oriental Series 62

Early Tamil Epigraphy from the Earliest Times to the Sixth Century A.D.

Edited and translated by Iravatham Mahadevan

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$75.00 • £60.95 • €67.50

ISBN 9780674012271

Publication Date: 11/30/2003

Short

768 pages

61 halftones, 16 line illustrations, 3 maps, 9 paleographic charts, 110 tracings and 110 photographic images

Harvard University Department of South Asian Studies > Harvard Oriental Series

Not for sale in India, Pakistan & Southeast Asia

This book presents the earliest South Indian inscriptions (ca. second century B.C. to sixth century A.D.), written in Tamil in local derivations of the Ashokan Brahmi script. They are the earliest known Dravidian documents available and show some overlap with the early Cera and Pandya dynasties. Their language is Archaic Tamil, with a few borrowings from Prakrit and influences of old Kannada, both resulting from the early presence of northern Jainism. The widespread occurrence of pottery inscriptions indicates that the Tamil-Brahmi script had taken deep roots all over the countryside, leading to the cultured society visible in the classical Tamil poetry of the Cankam (Sangam) texts of the early centuries C.E. The work includes texts, transliteration, translation, detailed commentary, inscriptional glossary, and indexes.

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