Cover: Children as Pawns: The Politics of Educational Reform, from Harvard University PressCover: Children as Pawns in PAPERBACK

Children as Pawns

The Politics of Educational Reform

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$35.00 • £28.95 • €31.50

ISBN 9780674012493

Publication Date: 09/01/2003

Short

272 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

World

Children as Pawns is what most of us has wished for whenever we have gotten into one of those tedious arguments in which none of us had the essential facts. Hacsi is a social policy historian with expertise in methods of evaluation. He describes the important research, points out its strengths and weaknesses, and tells how policies changed over time. It is a treasure trove of facts on our clumsy efforts to help children learn… [Hacsi’s] depth and clarity are not only helpful, but brave.—Jay Mathews, The Washington Post (online)

Hacsi opens this book with a simple question—“How can we improve our schools?”—and goes on to suggest that reform efforts must be rooted in solid research. Unfortunately, as he notes, the manner in which evaluative research on educational programs is conducted is fraught with difficulties, and, even worse, the ways in which the results of educational research are disseminated and reported are subject to powerful political pressures at every level. By providing historical case studies of what the research “really” tells us about controversial programs such as Head Start and bilingual education, Hacsi clearly demonstrates the influence that political interests can have on public perception of the efficacy of educational reform programs… Highly recommended.—Scott Walter, Library Journal

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