Cover: Brahms and the German Spirit, from Harvard University PressCover: Brahms and the German Spirit in HARDCOVER

Brahms and the German Spirit

Add to Cart

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$89.00 • £71.95 • €80.00

ISBN 9780674013186

Publication Date: 07/15/2004

Short

258 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

2 halftones, 4 line illustrations, 46 music examples, 7 tables

World

The music of Johannes Brahms is deeply colored, Daniel Beller-McKenna shows, by nineteenth-century German nationalism and by Lutheran religion. Focusing on the composer’s choral works, the author offers new insight on the cultural grounding for Brahms’s music.

Music historians have been reluctant to address Brahms’s Germanness, wary perhaps of fascist implications. Beller-McKenna counters this tendency; by giving an account of the intertwining of nationalism, politics, and religion that underlies major works, he restores Brahms to his place in nineteenth-century German culture. The author explores Brahms’s interest in the folk element in old church music; the intense national pride expressed in works such as the Triumphlied; the ways Luther’s Bible and Lutheranism are reflected in Brahms’s music; and the composer’s ideas about nation building. The final chapter looks at Brahms’s nationalistic image as employed by the National Socialists, 1933–1945, and as witnessed earlier in the century (including the complication of rumors that Brahms was Jewish).

In comparison to the overtly nationalist element in Wagner’s music, the German elements in Brahms’s style have been easy to overlook. This nuanced study uncovers those nationalistic elements, enriching our understanding both of Brahms’s art and of German culture.

Awards & Accolades

  • A Choice Outstanding Academic Title of 2005
Justice Rising: Robert Kennedy’s America in Black and White, by Patricia Sullivan, from Harvard University Press

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene