Cover: The Hellenistic Pottery from Sardis in HARDCOVER

Archaeological Exploration of Sardis Monographs 12

The Hellenistic Pottery from Sardis

The Finds through 1994

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$90.00 • £72.95 • €81.00

ISBN 9780674014619

Publication Date: 04/15/2004

Short

400 pages

713 black & white illustrations, 580 line drawings, & 3 maps

Archaeological Exploration of Sardis > Archaeological Exploration of Sardis Monographs

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Hellenistic art in Asia Minor is characterized by diverse cultural influences, both indigenous and Greek. This work presents a comprehensive catalogue of the Hellenistic pottery found at Sardis by two archaeological expeditions. The main catalogue includes over 750 items from the current excavations; in addition, material from some 50 Hellenistic tombs excavated in the early twentieth century is published in its entirety for the first time. The early Hellenistic material consists of imports from Greek cities and close local imitations, along with purely Lydian wares typical of the "late Lydian" phase that followed the Persian conquest. By the late Hellenistic period, Sardis boasts a full range of Greek shapes and styles; indeed, the influence of new conquerors, the Romans, was felt as well. Thus the ceramic finds from Sardis reflect the changing fortunes of the city, bearing witness to the tenacity of indigenous customs and the influences of foreign powers.

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