SERIES ON LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
Cover: Social Partnering in Latin America: Lessons Drawn from Collaborations of Businesses and Civil Society Organizations, from Harvard University PressCover: Social Partnering in Latin America in PAPERBACK

Series on Latin American Studies 12

Social Partnering in Latin America

Lessons Drawn from Collaborations of Businesses and Civil Society Organizations

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$24.99 • £19.95 • €22.50

ISBN 9780674015807

Publication Date: 09/30/2004

Short

410 pages

6 x 9 inches

12 line drawings, 5 tables

David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies > Series on Latin American Studies

World, subsidiary rights restricted

Can businesses collaborate with nonprofit organizations? Drawing lessons from 24 cases of cross-sector partnerships spanning the hemisphere, Social Partnering in Latin America analyzes how businesses and nonprofits are creating partnerships to move beyond traditional corporate philanthropy. An American supermarket and a Mexican food bank, an Argentine newspaper and a solidarity network, and a Chilean pharmacy chain and an elder care home are just a few examples of how businesses are partnering with community organizations in powerful ways throughout Latin America. The authors analyze why and how such social partnering occurs. The book provides a compelling framework for understanding cross-sector collaborations and identifying motivations for partnering and key levers that maximize value creation for participants and society.

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