Cover: Bring Out Your Dead: The Past as Revelation, from Harvard University PressCover: Bring Out Your Dead in PAPERBACK

Bring Out Your Dead

The Past as Revelation

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$28.50 • £22.95 • €25.50

ISBN 9780674015975

Publication Date: 10/25/2004

Academic Trade

368 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

8 halftones

World

The work of the Renaissance humanists comes to life in Anthony Grafton’s exploration of the primary sources and modern scholarship, classical and modern elements in the world of European letters from the fifteenth to the nineteenth century.

Tracing the ties that bound the world of humanistic learning in early modern Europe to other social and cultural spheres, Grafton defines the current state of the art of scholarship on early modern European cultural and intellectual history while simultaneously demonstrating how entertaining, enlightening, and relevant that history can be.

Covering a dazzling variety of topics and authors as different as Alberti and Descartes, Grafton maps the grand and meticulous efforts of the past to connect the realm of nature with that of books, the realm of everyday experience with that of passionate reading in massive tomes, and the realm of codes of etiquette and institutions with that of extravagant and joyous erudition—efforts that this book itself brilliantly carries on.

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