Cover: Remaking the American Mainstream: Assimilation and Contemporary Immigration, from Harvard University PressCover: Remaking the American Mainstream in PAPERBACK

Remaking the American Mainstream

Assimilation and Contemporary Immigration

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$31.50 • £25.95 • €28.50

ISBN 9780674018136

Publication Date: 09/30/2005

Short

384 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

11 line illustrations, 6 tables

World

In this age of multicultural democracy, the idea of assimilation—that the social distance separating immigrants and their children from the mainstream of American society closes over time—seems outdated and, in some forms, even offensive. But as Richard Alba and Victor Nee show in the first systematic treatment of assimilation since the mid-1960s, it continues to shape the immigrant experience, even though the geography of immigration has shifted from Europe to Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Institutional changes, from civil rights legislation to immigration law, have provided a more favorable environment for nonwhite immigrants and their children than in the past.

Assimilation is still driven, in claim, by the decisions of immigrants and the second generation to improve their social and material circumstances in America. But they also show that immigrants, historically and today, have profoundly changed our mainstream society and culture in the process of becoming Americans.

Surveying a variety of domains—language, socioeconomic attachments, residential patterns, and intermarriage—they demonstrate the continuing importance of assimilation in American life. And they predict that it will blur the boundaries among the major, racially defined populations, as nonwhites and Hispanics are increasingly incorporated into the mainstream.

Awards & Accolades

  • 2005 Mirra Komarovsky Book Award, Eastern Sociological Society
  • 2004 Thomas and Znaniecki Book Award, International Migration Section of the American Sociological Association
  • Honorable Mention, 2003 Association of American Publishers PSP Award, Sociology & Anthropology Category
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