HELLENIC STUDIES SERIES
Cover: Poetic and Performative Memory in Ancient Greece: Heroic Reference and Ritual Gestures in Time and Space, from Harvard University PressCover: Poetic and Performative Memory in Ancient Greece in PAPERBACK

Hellenic Studies Series 18

Poetic and Performative Memory in Ancient Greece

Heroic Reference and Ritual Gestures in Time and Space

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$19.95 • £15.95 • €18.00

ISBN 9780674021242

Publication Date: 10/30/2009

Short

275 pages

5-1/2 x 9 inches

Center for Hellenic Studies > Hellenic Studies Series

World, subsidiary rights restricted

  • Foreword
  • I. Spatial-Temporal Poetics of the Past in Ancient Greece
    • 1. Prelude: A Historian’s Tensions (“tensions historiennes”) relative to the present
    • 2. Pragmatics of spatial-temporal representations
      • 2.1. Philosophical temporalities
      • 2.2. The double articulation of calendar time
      • 2.3. The question of putting-into-discourse
      • 2.4. The enunciative dimension
      • 2.5. Inescapable pragmatics
    • 3. Interlude: between places and acts of memory
    • 4. From the time of historiopoiesis to historic space: Herodotus
      • 4.1. A spatial-temporal investigation
      • 4.2. Pragmatic aspects of enunciation
    • 5. A historiographic semiotics of indices: Thucydides
      • 5.1. About traces
      • 5.2. Greek prefigurations of time: the semeia
      • 5.3. Sight and hearing: recent history
      • 5.4. The role of images
      • 5.5. Return to poietics
    • 6. For an anthropological historiography
      • 6.1. Interfering temporalities, converging approaches
      • 6.2. Possible worlds and historicity of belief communities
      • 6.3. Regimes of historicity and logics of temporality
      • 6.4. Enunciation and regimes of identity
    • 7. Comparative triangles
  • II. The Succession of Ages and Poetic Pragmatics of Justice: Hesiod&Rsquo;S Narrative of the Five Human Species
    • 1. Object and method: from structural analysis to discursive study
    • 2. Narrative time development (deroulement): enunciation and argumentation
      • 2.1. A narrative and poetic prelude
      • 2.2. The concern of the beginning: between Homeric Hymns and historiography
      • 2.3. Spatial-temporal structures and logics
        • 2.3.1. Men of gold: guardians of mortals
        • 2.3.2. The men of silver: blessed chthonians
        • 2.3.3. The men of bronze: self-destruction and anonymity
        • 2.3.4. The Age of Heroes: marked space and time
        • 2.3.5. The men of iron: a prophetic future
      • 2.4. Narrative and poetic context
        • 2.4.1. Narrative of Pandora and the jar of Hope
        • 2.4.2. The fable of the the hawk and the nightingale as argument
        • 2.4.3. Poetic effect, between justice and life resources
      • 2.5. Enunciative polyphony and the voice of the poet
        • 2.5.1. The poet’s word of authority and hope
        • 2.5.2. Communication, poetic genre, and the city
    • 3. The hazards of comparison: “comparing the incomparable”?
      • 3.1. Comparatist incursions between Indo-European and Semitic references
      • 3.2. Daniel and the vetero-testamentary dream of Nebuchadnezzar
    • 4. The hic et nunc of a didactic poem
  • III. Creation of Gender and Heroic Identity Between Legend and Cult: The Political Creation of Theseus by Bacchylides
    • 1. Sexual social relationships and spatial-temporal representations
      • 1.1. Enunciation of representations of gender
      • 1.2. Temporalities between line and circl
    • 2. Narrative movements in time and space
      • 2.1. Essay on semio-narrative analysis
      • 2.2. From ordeal to tribal initiation ritual
      • 2.3. Erotic images
      • 2.4. Aphrodite and marriage
    • 3. From the Aegean Sea to the banks of the Sepik: comparisons
      • 3.1. Masculine tribal initiation: the Iatmuls
      • 3.2. Puberty rites for girls: the Abelams
    • 4. The practices of enunciative poetry
      • 4.1. Time and space recounted in the spatial-temporal frame of enunciation
      • 4.2. Signature, aition, and poetic genre
      • 4.3. The poetic legimitization of a maritime “empire”
      • 4.4. Symbolic births from the sea and iconography
  • IV. Regimes of Historicity and Oracular Logic: How to Re-Found a Colonial City?
    • 1. Cyclical and philosophical temporalities
    • 2. A doubly-founding document
    • 3. Temporal and enunciative architecture
      • 3.1. The first section: “God. Good fortune.”
        • 3.1.1. The narrative of the act of foundation
        • 3.1.2. The consecration of the decree of Cyrene
      • 3.2. The second section: “Oath of the Founders”
        • 3.2.1. The contractual decree of foundation
        • 3.2.2. Contract, imprecation, and ritual gesture
      • 3.3. Temporal-spatial networks
    • 4. Time of the oracles and time of the citizen
    • 5. Weaving space and time between Delphi and Cyrene
  • V. Ritual and Initiatory Itineraries Toward the Afterlife: Time, Space, and Pragmatics in the Gold Lamellae
    • 1. Neo-mystical aspirations
    • 2. The spatial-temporal itinerary of a dead woman at Hipponion
      • 2.1. Narration and enunciation
        • 2.1.1. An incipit in the form of a sphragis
        • 2.1.2. The two springs
        • 2.1.3. Declaration of identity
        • 2.1.4. The four elements
        • 2.1.5. Access to the realm of the blessed
      • 2.2. Enunciative pragmatics: the funerary context
        • 2.2.1. The poetic workings of gender
        • 2.2.2. A few intertextual echoes
      • 2.3. Initiatory itinerary under the aegis of Dionysus
        • 2.3.1. Initiates’ shortcuts in Hades
        • 2.3.2. Mystes and bacchant: a preliminary status
    • 3. Modalities of funerary initiation
      • 3.1. Thourioi: purity and divine felicity
      • 3.2. Pelinna: falling into milk and metaphor
    • 4. From Bacchus to Orpheus: comparisons and contrasts
      • 4.1. Original sin and Christian expiation
      • 4.2. Iconographic representations of the Underworld
      • 4.3. Orpheus and Dionysus as musicians
      • 4.4. Dionsysus, excluding Orpheus
    • 5. Passwords for a collective funerary identity
  • VI. By Way of Conclusion: Returns to the Present
  • VII. Bibliography

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