HELLENIC STUDIES SERIES
Cover: The Culture of Kitharoidia, from Harvard University PressCover: The Culture of Kitharoidia in PAPERBACK

Hellenic Studies Series 15

The Culture of Kitharoidia

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$18.95 • £15.95 • €17.00

ISBN 9780674021389

Publication Date: 12/01/2010

Short

652 pages

5-1/2 x 9 inches

5 black and white halftones, 5 line drawings

Center for Hellenic Studies > Hellenic Studies Series

World, subsidiary rights restricted

Kitharôidia was arguably the most popular, most geographically widespread, and longest-running performance genre in antiquity. From the archaic period to the late Roman imperial era, citharodes enjoyed star status, playing their songs to vast crowds at festival competitions and concerts throughout the Mediterranean world.

The Culture of Kitharoidia is the first study dedicated exclusively to the art, practice, and charismatic persona of the citharode. Traversing a wide range of discourse and imagery about kitharôidia—poetic and prose texts, iconography, inscriptions—the book offers a nuanced account of the aesthetic and sociocultural complexities of citharodic song and examines the iconic role of the songmakers in the popular imagination, from mythical citharodes such as Orpheus to the controversial innovator Timotheus, to that most notorious of musical dilettantes, Nero.

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