Cover: Bolton’s Catalogue of Ants of the World in CD-ROM

Bolton’s Catalogue of Ants of the World

1758–2005

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Product Details

CD-ROM

$70.00 • £56.95 • €63.00

ISBN 9780674021518

Publication Date: 02/28/2007

Short

World, subsidiary rights restricted

With his colleagues, Bolton has published this CD-ROM that updates his book New General Catalogue of the Ants of the World (1995). This update is a comprehensive, searchable database that includes more than 9,700 references to ants published from 1758 to 2005. The catalog covers nearly 11,500 species in 23 subfamilies, with an additional 600 extinct species. This easy-to-use database is searchable by the current species name, the original combination, higher taxonomic categories, validity, author, year, IUCN Red List status, and the type locality by country. The species index is color-coded so that valid versus junior names and fossil taxa can be readily distinguished. The literature source for information on the different castes and karyotype of a given species is provided. Anyone wishing to quickly identify the current name of a species or to resolve taxonomic questions should find this database useful… It will be invaluable for specialists in ant systematics and researchers with a special technical interest in this group.—R. E. Lee, Jr., Choice

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