Cover: Irresistible Empire: America’s Advance through Twentieth-Century Europe, from Harvard University PressCover: Irresistible Empire in PAPERBACK

Irresistible Empire

America’s Advance through Twentieth-Century Europe

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$33.00 • £26.95 • €29.50

ISBN 9780674022348

Publication Date: 10/31/2006

Short

608 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

45 halftones

Belknap Press

World

  • Introduction: The Fast Way to Peace
  • 1. The Service Ethic: How Bourgeois Men Made Peace with Babbittry
  • 2. A Decent Standard of Living: How Europeans Were Measured by the American Way of Life
  • 3. The Chain Store: How Modern Distribution Dispossessed Commerce
  • 4. Big-Brand Goods: How Marketing Outmaneuvered the Marketplace
  • 5. Corporate Advertising: How the Science of Publicity Subverted the Arts of Commerce
  • 6. The Star System: How Hollywood Turned Cinema Culture into Entertainment Value
  • 7. The Consumer-Citizen: How Europeans Traded Rights for Goods
  • 8. Supermarketing: How Big-Time Merchandisers Leapfrogged over Local Grocers
  • 9. A Model Mrs. Consumer: How Mass Commodities Settled into Hearth and Home
  • Conclusion: How the Slow Movement Put Perspective on the Fast Life
  • Notes
  • Bibliographic Essay
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index

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Jacket: Atomic Doctors: Conscience and Complicity at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age, by James L. Nolan, Jr., from Harvard University Press

Remembering Hiroshima

On this day 75 years ago, the United States dropped the world’s first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. James L. Nolan Jr.’s grandfather was a doctor who participated in the Manhattan Project, and he writes about him in Atomic Doctors: Conscience and Complicity at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age, an unflinching examination of the moral and professional dilemmas faced by physicians who took part in the project. Below, please find the introduction to Nolan’s book. On the morning of June 17, 1945, Captain James F. Nolan, MD, boarded a plane