STUDIES IN GLOBAL EQUITY
Cover: Portrait of a Giving Community: Philanthropy by the Pakistani-American Diaspora, from Harvard University PressCover: Portrait of a Giving Community in PAPERBACK

Portrait of a Giving Community

Philanthropy by the Pakistani-American Diaspora

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$19.95 • £15.95 • €18.00

ISBN 9780674023666

Publication Date: 01/15/2007

Short

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

42 black and white line drawings, 11 tables

Global Equity Initiative, Harvard University > Studies in Global Equity

World

A fascinating snapshot of immigration and assimilation in the context of the ‘War on Terror’ and the conflation of Islamic charities with terrorist activity. It throws a light on how Pakistani-Americans, a community often feared, maligned and otherwise misunderstood in the United States, address the twin questions of ‘What does it mean to be an American?’ and ‘What does it mean to be a global citizen?’ It also makes one consider the vast untapped potential to garner financial support for social development and poverty alleviation in the developing world from diaspora communities and individuals who think and act globally and locally.—A. A. Lund-Chaix, Voluntas

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