PROCEEDINGS OF THE HARVARD CELTIC COLLOQUIUM
Cover: Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 20/21: 2000 and 2001 in HARDCOVER

Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 20/21: 2000 and 2001

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HARDCOVER

$32.95 • £26.95 • €29.50

ISBN 9780674023833

Publication Date: 09/15/2007

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Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 20 includes “Retoiric and Composition in Geneamuin Chormaic,” by Hugh Fogarty; “Classical Ethnography and Celts: Can We Trust the Sources?” by Philip Freeman; “Prayers, Prizefights and Prostitution: The Medieval Irish Cemetery and Its Many Uses,” by Susan Leigh Fry; “Magical Realism and the Mabinogi: An Exercise in Methodology,” by Michael Linkletter; “Rebuke and Revision in the Early Irish Annals: The Death-Notices of Muirchertach mac Ercae [†534],” by Laurence Maney; “‘To a man for the King’: The Allegiance of Welsh Catholics during the First Civil War, 1642–46,” by Robert Matthews; “King and Druid,” by Arun Micheelsen; “‘Words, words, words’: Language about Language in France and Ireland,” by Grace Neville; “Ystoria Tri Brenin o Gwlen,” by Prydwyn Piper; and “Highland Motives in the Jacobite Rising of 1745–46: ‘Forcing Out,’ Traditional Documentation and Gaelic Poetry,” by James A. Stewart, Jr.

Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 21 includes “Gendering the Vita Prima: An Examination of St. Brigid’s Role as ‘Mary of the Gael,’” by Diane Peters Auslander; “Apollonius of Rhodes’ Argonautica: A Mythology of Greek Expansion in Celtic Lands,” by Timothy P. Bridgman; “The Wealth of the Medieval Welsh Gentry: The Case of Gwilym ap Gruffydd of Penrhyn,” by A. D. Carr; “Celtic Languages in the 1910 U.S. Census,” by Jonathan Dembling; “Digging Deeper: Adventures in Medieval Irish Burial and the Case for Interdisciplinary Scholarship,” by Susan Leigh Fry; “Laoiseach Mac an Bhaird and the Politics of Close Reading,” by Sarah E. McKibben; “Prescient Birds and Prospective Kings: Further Comments on Irish Elements in the Eddic Poem Rígsþula,” by Amy Eichhorn Mulligan; “The Descent of the Gods: Creation, Cosmogony, and Divine Order in Lebor Gabála,” by Sharon Paice Macleod; “Babel Is Come Again: Linguistic Colonisation and the Bardic Response in Early Modern Ireland,” by Patricia Palmer; “‘In Defiance of the Gospel and by Authority of the Devil’: Criticism of Welsh Marriage Law by the English Ecclesiastical Establishment and Its Socio-Political Context,” by Laura Radiker; and “The Way We Were: Twentieth Century Brittany through the Eyes of Breton Language Memorialists,” by Lenora Timm.

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