PROCEEDINGS OF THE HARVARD CELTIC COLLOQUIUM
Cover: Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 20/21: 2000 and 2001 in HARDCOVER

Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 20/21: 2000 and 2001

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$32.95 • £26.95 • €29.50

ISBN 9780674023833

Publication Date: 09/15/2007

Short

Benjamin Bruch received his Ph.D. from the Department of Celtic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University, in 2005. He teaches Celtic languages, literature, culture, and music at Pendarvis State Historic Site in Mineral Point, Wisconsin, and through the Celtic Institute of the Midwest.

Charlene Shipman Eska is Associate Professor of English at Virginia Tech. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Celtic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University, in 2006.

Hugh Fogarty received his Ph.D. from the Department of Celtic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University, in 2005. He is Editor of the Thesaurus Linguae Hibernicae, a project of University College Dublin.

Kathryn Izzo received her Ph.D. from the Department of Celtic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University, in 2007.

Diana Luft is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies, University of Wales. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Celtic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University, in 2004.

Katharine Olson is Assistant Professor of History at San Jose State University. She received her Ph.D. from the Departments of History and of Celtic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University, in 2008.

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