THE BERNARD BERENSON LECTURES ON THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE DELIVERED AT VILLA I TATTI
Cover: The Culture Wars of the Late Renaissance: Skeptics, Libertines, and Opera, from Harvard University PressCover: The Culture Wars of the Late Renaissance in HARDCOVER

The Culture Wars of the Late Renaissance

Skeptics, Libertines, and Opera

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$40.00 • £32.95 • €36.00

ISBN 9780674024816

Publication Date: 05/15/2007

Short

  • List of Illustrations*
  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • 1. The Skeptics: Galileo’s Telescope and Cremonini’s Headache
  • 2. The Libertines: The Celestial Divorce
  • 3. The Librettists: Poppea in the Opera Box
  • Notes
  • Index
  • * Illustrations
    • 1. The telescope and lens of Galileo Galilei. Photo: Scala / Art Resource, New York.
    • 2. Portrait of Galileo by Ottavio Leoni, chalk drawing. Photo: Scala / Art Resource, New York.
    • 3. Galileo Galilei, Galileo presenting his telescope to the Muses, from Opere di Galileo Galilei (Bologna, 1655–1656), engraving. Photo: Snark / Art Resource, New York.
    • 4. Title page to Ferrante Pallavicino, Il Divortio celeste (Ingolstadt, 1643). Photo courtesy of the Newberry Library, Chicago.
    • 5. Ex ignoto notus (“The known from the unknown”), motto and emblem of the Incogniti, engraving from Girolamo Brusoni, Jacopo Gaddi, or Giovanni Francesco Loredan (?), Le Glorie degl’Incogniti (Venice, 1647), facing page 1. Photo courtesy of the Newberry Library, Chicago.
    • 6. Engraving of an emblem of the Accademia degli Incogniti, from Girolamo Brusoni, Jacopo Gaddi, or Giovanni Francesco Loredan (?), Le Glorie degl’Incogniti (Venice, 1647). Photo courtesy of the Newberry Library, Chicago.
    • 7. Pietro della Vecchia, Socrates and His Two Pupils, also known as Know Thyself, oil painting, Prado, Madrid. Photo: Prado, Madrid.
    • 8. Frontispiece engraving from Giovanni Francesco Loredan, Discorsi academici de’Signori incogniti (Venice, 1635). Photo courtesy of the Newberry Library, Chicago.
    • 9. Ferrante Pallavicino, engraving from Girolamo Brusoni, Jacopo Gaddi, or Giovanni Francesco Loredan (?), Le Glorie degl’Incogniti (Venice, 1647), p. 136. Photo courtesy of the Newberry Library, Chicago.
    • 10. Title page of Ferrante Pallavicino, La Retorica delle puttane (Cambrai, 1642). Photo courtesy of the Newberry Library, Chicago.
    • 11. Luca Giordano, The Death of Seneca, Louvre, Paris. Photo: Erich Lessing / Art Resource, New York.

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