HARVARD HISTORICAL STUDIES
Cover: The Notables and the Nation: The Political Schooling of the French, 1787–1788, from Harvard University PressCover: The Notables and the Nation in HARDCOVER

Harvard Historical Studies 157

The Notables and the Nation

The Political Schooling of the French, 1787–1788

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$89.00 • £71.95 • €80.00

ISBN 9780674025349

Publication Date: 01/31/2008

Short

518 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

11 halftones

Harvard Historical Studies

World

In a detailed examination of this critical transition, Gruder examines how the French people became engaged in a movement of opposition that culminated in demands for the public’s role in government.The Times Higher Education Supplement

This excellent work retraces the pre-revolutionary political events of 1787–1788. Particularly interesting is Gruder’s convincing evidence—in the form of newspapers, pamphlets, and nouvelles à la main—showing that the debates of the notables, and after them the Paris Parlementaires, were widely discussed by an involved and informed French reading public. Combining a lively awareness of recent scholarship on the formation of public opinion and the nature of the reading public with a well-written, accessible text, The Notables and the Nation offers much to be admired.—Patrice Higonnet, author of Paris: Capital of the World

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

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