Cover: Rebuilding Buddhism: The Theravada Movement in Twentieth-Century Nepal, from Harvard University PressCover: Rebuilding Buddhism in PAPERBACK

Rebuilding Buddhism

The Theravada Movement in Twentieth-Century Nepal

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$34.50 • £27.95 • €31.00

ISBN 9780674025547

Publication Date: 09/30/2007

Short

394 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

27 halftones, 2 maps, 5 tables, 1 chart

Not for sale in India, Bangladesh, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, and Bhutan

Rebuilding Buddhism describes in evocative detail the experiences and achievements of Nepalis who have adopted Theravada Buddhism. This form of Buddhism was introduced into Nepal from Burma and Sri Lanka in the 1930s, and its adherents have struggled for recognition and acceptance ever since. With its focus on the austere figure of the monk and the biography of the historical Buddha, and more recently with its emphasis on individualizing meditation and on gender equality, Theravada Buddhism contrasts sharply with the highly ritualized Tantric Buddhism traditionally practiced in the Kathmandu Valley.

Based on extensive fieldwork, interviews, and historical reconstruction, the book provides a rich portrait of the different ways of being a Nepali Buddhist over the past seventy years. At the same time it explores the impact of the Theravada movement and what its gradual success has meant for Buddhism, for society, and for men and women in Nepal.

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

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In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene