HELLENIC STUDIES SERIES
Cover: Concordia Discors in PAPERBACK

Hellenic Studies Series 24

Concordia Discors

Eros and Dialogue in Classical Athenian Literature

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$18.95 • £15.95 • €17.00

ISBN 9780674025981

Publication Date: 02/29/2008

Short

174 pages

5-1/2 x 9 inches

Center for Hellenic Studies > Hellenic Studies Series

World, subsidiary rights restricted

Writing to a friend, Horace describes the man as fascinated by “the discordant harmony of the cosmos, its purpose and power.” Andrew Scholtz takes this notion of “discordant harmony” and argues for it as an aesthetic principle where classical Athenian literature addresses politics in the idiom of sexual desire. His approach is an untried one for this kind of topic. Drawing on theorists of the sociality of language, Scholtz shows how eros, consuming, destabilizing desire, became a vehicle for exploring and exploiting dissonance within the songs Athenians sang about themselves. Thus he shows how societal tension and instability could register as an ideologically charged polyphony in works like the Periclean Funeral Oration, Aristophanes’s Knights, and Xenophon’s Symposium.

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