THE JOHN HARVARD LIBRARY
Cover: On Religious Liberty: Selections from the Works of Roger Williams, from Harvard University PressCover: On Religious Liberty in PAPERBACK

On Religious Liberty

Selections from the Works of Roger Williams

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$31.50 • £25.95 • €28.50

ISBN 9780674026858

Publication Date: 01/31/2008

Academic Trade

312 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

Belknap Press

The John Harvard Library

World

Williams’s writings have long been virtually unavailable to the general public. Now Harvard University Press has published On Religious Liberty: Selections From the Works of Roger Williams, edited by scholar James Calvin Davis. Davis provides around three hundred pages of Williams’s writings… Davis has a keen eye for the telling passage, and he arranges the extracts helpfully, adding a lucid introduction. His fine volume will be especially useful for purposes of teaching, and it will sustain us while we await a more complete re-issue of the major works and letters.—Martha Nussbaum, The New Republic

A major contribution to our understanding of the history of religion in America, this book speaks to issues of church and state and freedom of conscience that still resonate today.—Charles T. Mathewes, University of Virginia

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