Cover: The Virtual Life of Film, from Harvard University PressCover: The Virtual Life of Film in PAPERBACK

The Virtual Life of Film

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$34.50 • £27.95 • €31.00

ISBN 9780674026988

Publication Date: 10/30/2007

Academic Trade

216 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

18 halftones

World

  • Preface
  • List of Illustrations*
  • I. The Virtual Life of Film
    • 1. Futureworld
    • 2. The Incredible Shrinking Medium
    • 3. Back to the Future
  • II: What Was Cinema?
    • 4. Film Begets Video
    • 5. The Death of Cinema and the Birth of Film Studies
    • 6. A Medium in All Things
    • 7. Automatisms and Art
    • 8. Automatism and Photography
    • 9. Succession and the Film Strip
    • 10. Ways of Worldmaking
    • 11. A World Past
    • 12. An Ethics of Time
  • III: A New Landscape (without Image)
    • 13. An Elegy for Film
    • 14. The New “Media”
    • 15. Paradoxes of Perceptual Realism
    • 16. Real Is as Real Does
    • 17. Lost in Translation: Analogy and Index Revisited
    • 18. Simulation, or Automatism as Algorithm
    • 19. An Image That Is Not “One”
    • 20. Two Futures for Electronic Images, or What Comes after Photography?
    • 21. The Digital Event
    • 22. Transcoded Ontologies, or “A Guess at the Riddle”
    • 23. Old and New, or the (Virtual) Renascence of Cinema Studies
  • Acknowledgments
  • * Illustrations:
    • Frame enlargement from 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
    • Frame enlargement from Jurassic Park (1993)
    • Man Ray, Self-portrait with camera (1931)
    • Rayography: Film strip and sphere (1922)
    • The Battle of Waterloo (ca. 1820)
    • Alexander Gardner, A Harvest of Death (1863)
    • The two camera set-ups of Numéro zéro (1971)
    • Two frame enlargements from Eloge de l’amour (2003)
    • Frame enlargement from Forrest Gump (1994)
    • The two “worlds” of The Matrix (1999)
    • Frame enlargement from Arabesque (John Whitney, 1975)
    • Abu Ghraib documentation (2003)
    • Sam Taylor-Wood, Pietà (2001)
    • Raw data from Russian Ark (2002)
    • Frame enlargement from Russian Ark (2002)

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