Cover: The Warping of Government Work, from Harvard University PressCover: The Warping of Government Work in HARDCOVER

The Warping of Government Work

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$50.00 • £40.95 • €45.00

ISBN 9780674027886

Publication Date: 05/30/2008

Short

224 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

10 line illustrations, 12 tables

World

The Warping of Government Work offers an intriguing view of the impact that changes in the private economy have had on both the nature of government jobs and challenges to government performance. This eminently readable book is a significant contribution to discussions about effective government.—Judy Feder, Professor of Public Policy, Georgetown University

In The Warping of Government Work, John Donahue presents valuable insights into the human capital crises compromising the quality of government. The premise of the book—that the quality and durability of American life depends on good government, which, in turn, requires highly skilled and talented individuals—is compelling. Donahue easily convinces us that the process of recruiting, choosing, and retaining skilled persons in government is critical. The Warping of Government Work advances the understanding of a substantial problem facing government at all levels.—Stephen Goldsmith, Daniel Paul Professor of Government, John F. Kennedy School of Government, and former mayor of Indianapolis, IN

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene