HARVARD HISTORICAL STUDIES
Cover: Woodrow Wilson and the American Myth in Italy: Culture, Diplomacy, and War Propaganda, from Harvard University PressCover: Woodrow Wilson and the American Myth in Italy in HARDCOVER

Harvard Historical Studies 161

Woodrow Wilson and the American Myth in Italy

Culture, Diplomacy, and War Propaganda

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$68.50 • £54.95 • €61.50

ISBN 9780674028241

Publication Date: 05/30/2008

Short

276 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

2 tables, 1 map

Harvard Historical Studies

World

The result of almost twenty years of research, this study of Italian-American relations at the moment of the first direct political impact gives us an exhaustive and stimulating analysis of two incompatible worlds, forced to collaborate in order to reach a peace for Southern Europe after the great catastrophe. So wide was the chasm between the two countries in terms of political culture, grasp of on-going developments, mentality and morality, that the failure of their projects was inevitable... Authoritative, original, lucid, the book is unique in its genre in Western European historiography.—David W. Ellwood, Il Mestiere di Storico

Rossini’s reconstruction of the American eruption into Italy during the Great War is accurate and full of nuances: it embraces the relief work of the American Red Cross and of the Young Men’s Christian Association, which was also precious to propaganda owing to their material abundance, and the activity of the "propaganda professionals" of the Committee on Public Information, who spread Wilsonian idealism at home and abroad through advertising and moving pictures, which were completely new to the Italian public...Daniela Rossini’s book is a stimulating example of international history. In synthesis, it is a history essay on international relations whose scope has been widened to include non-governmental subjects--individuals, private associations, companies--in order to obtain a firmer grasp of the cultural roots of international politics.—Marco Mariano, L’Indice

Seldom are well-researched history books engaging. The critical apparatus employed and the analytical mode of exposition can make heavy reading, especially when the subject is not well known. But Daniela Rossini’s book on Italy and the United States during World War I succeeds in combining a solid scientific approach with a pleasing narration of events. This is the result of both the author’s fluent writing style and, especially, her strong grasp of the events of the time, the fruit of long study and reflection. Particularly interesting are the pages describing the differences and similarities between Italy and the United States (already an economic giant with an industrial production equal to that of the UK and Germany) at the beginning of the twentieth century, and those outlining the images Italy and the USA had of each other. Her portrait of Fiorello LaGuardia vividly evokes the impulsive temperament of the first Italian to play a significant role in American political life, while the analysis of Woodrow Wilson’s policy and personality reveals the author’s familiarity with the most representative President of his generation. Rossini’s analysis of American policy towards Italy during and after World War I has a lot to tell anyone interested in understanding the ideological and procedural aspects of American diplomacy, also today.—Roberto Morozzo della Rocca, Scaffale

A remarkable book...A comprehensive picture which sheds light on previously unknown aspects of Italian-American relations.—Sandro Gerbi, Il Corriere della Sera

Culture matters in diplomacy. Daniela Rossini certainly confirms the validity of that premise for Italian-American relations during World War I and at the Paris Peace Conference. Taking inspiration from the historian Akira Iriye, the author adds a much welcome international perspective to the recent European trend of studies on culture and national identities...Rossini provides an illuminating example of how diplomatic and cultural history can be usefully merged.—Alessandro Brogi, Journal of American History

A compelling study of nationalist arrogance misrepresented as selfless idealism. Rossini’s edifying study concerns the impact of Wilsonian idealism on U.S.-Italian relations and the disastrous unintended consequences of the United States’ first war to remake the world in its own image. Her book should have the effect of a fire bell in the night. —Richard Drake, author of Apostles and Agitators: Italy’s Marxist Revolutionary Tradition

A thoroughly researched and brilliantly presented study of the impact of Woodrow Wilson on Italy during the First World War. Rossini shows that this was the first instance when massive propaganda became a tool of U.S. foreign policy and that it succeeded in creating a sense of mass nationalism in a country where people’s identities had been more fragmented. What Wilson and the emissaries of the ‘American myth’ tried out in Italy would be repeated on many future occasions. Thus the book provides a superb examination of American exceptionalism in the service of the world. —Akira Iriye, Harvard University

In a well-written and judicious book, Rossini demonstrates how the Italian public constructed a distorted, idealized image of the American president and his foreign policy goals, owing to the skillful spinning of his image by the U.S. propaganda machine--the Committee on Public Information--and to wishful thinking on the part of an Italian public aching for a savior from across the Atlantic. This is a valuable addition to the literature on Wilsonianism, the First World War, and the Paris Peace Conference. —William R. Keylor, Boston University

This engaging, thought--provoking work argues that the cultural differences between Italy and the U.S. contributed to the Italian public being more responsive to U.S. propaganda.—J. B. Cook, Choice

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