PROCEEDINGS OF THE HARVARD CELTIC COLLOQUIUM
Cover: Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 22: 2002 in HARDCOVER

Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 22: 2002

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HARDCOVER

$32.95 • £26.95 • €29.50

ISBN 9780674031340

Publication Date: 09/30/2008

Text

250 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

25 line illustrations

Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium

World

Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 22 includes “Toward a Breton Musical Patrimony: Symbiosis and Synthesis of the Folkloric, the Classical, and the Impressionistic,” by Paul-André Beméchat; “Celts and Hyperboreans: Crossing Mythical Boundaries,” by Timothy Bridgman; “The Sea as an Emotional Landscape in Scottish Gaelic Song,” by Màiri Sìne Chaimbeul; “Patriarchy and Power in Medieval Welsh Literature,” by Kirstie Chandler; “Tamlachta: The Map of Plague Burials and Some Implications for Early Irish History,” by Gene Haley; “A Social History of Houses: The Hebridean Example,” by Catriona Machie; “Some Thoughts on the Operation of Native Law in Medieval Ireland,” by Kevin Murray; “French Connections from Tipperary to Toulouse in the Ryan of Inch Papers, 1820,” by Grace Neville; “‘On va Parler Breton a Bruxelles?’: The Impact of the European Union on Celtic Cultural and National Identities,” by Lenora Timm; and “The Search for the Holy Grail: Scholars, Critics, and Occultists,” by Juliette Wood.

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene