THE BERNARD BERENSON LECTURES ON THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE DELIVERED AT VILLA I TATTI
Cover: Friendship, Love, and Trust in Renaissance Florence, from Harvard University PressCover: Friendship, Love, and Trust in Renaissance Florence in HARDCOVER

Friendship, Love, and Trust in Renaissance Florence

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$42.00 • £33.95 • €38.00

ISBN 9780674031371

Publication Date: 01/31/2009

Short

  • List of Illustrations*
  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • 1. What Did Friendship Mean?
  • 2. Where Did Friends Meet?
  • 3. Could Friends Be Trusted?
  • Dramatis Personae
  • Notes
  • Index
  • * Illustrations
    • 1.1. Brunelleschi, cupola of the cathedral (Santa Maria del Fiore), Florence. Photo: Scala/Art Resource, New York.
    • 1.2. Leon Battista Alberti, Self-portrait, c. 1435, bronze. Samuel H. Kress Collection. Image courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
    • 1.3. The Ethics of Aristotle: The Hague, Rijksmuseum Meermanno-Westreenianum, MS 10 D 1, fol. 150. Photo: Rijksmuseum Meermanno-Westreenianum.
    • 1.4. Fra Angelico, Virgin and Child with Saints Cosmas and Damian, altarpiece, Museo di San Marco, Florence. Photo: Niccolò Orsi Battaglini.
    • 1.5. Masaccio, Trinity, Santa Maria Novella, Florence, fresco, 1420s. Photo courtesy of Fototeca Berenson, Villa I Tatti.
    • 1.6. Lorenzo Monaco, attributed, The Intercession of Christ and the Virgin, fresco, New York, The Cloisters Collection, 1953. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
    • 1.7. Madonna della Misericordia, fifteenth-century wooden statue, Museo del Bargello, Florence. Photo courtesy of the Ministero per I Beni e le Attività Culturali.
    • 1.8. Giotto da Bondone, Last Judgement, detail, Enrico Scrovegni Presenting His Chapel to the Virgin, fresco, Arena Chapel, Padua. Photo: Antonio Quattrone.
    • 1.9. Benozzo Gozzoli, Crucifixion with the Virgin and Saints Cosmas, John and Peter Martyr, convent of San Marco, Florence. Photo: Niccolò Orsi Battaglini.
    • 1.10. Andrea Verrocchio and workshop, including Leonardo da Vinci, Tobias and the Angel. Photo © National Gallery of Art, London.
    • 1.11. Fra Filippo Lippi, The Madonna and Child Enthroned with St. Stephen, St. John the Baptist, Francesco di Marco Datini and Four Buonomini of the Hospital of the Ceppo of Prato, Galleria communale di Palazzo Pretorio, Prato. Photo courtesy of the Ministero per I Beni e le Attività Culturali.
    • 1.12. Iacopo Pontormo, Two Men with a Passage from Cicero’s On Friendship, Venice, Galleria del Palazzo Cini. Photo courtesy of Biblioteca Berenson, Villa I Tatti.
    • 1.13. Fra Angelico and Fra Filippo Lippi, Adoration of the Magi, c. 1440–1460. Samuel H. Kress Collection. Image courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
    • 1.14. Benozzo Gozzoli, Procession of the Magi, Medici palace chapel, east wall, Florence. Photo: Antonio Quattrone.
    • 1.15. Domenico Ghirlandaio, A Scene from the Life of St. Francis, Confirmation of the Rule, Sassetti Chapel, Santa Trinita, Florence. Photo: Antonio Quattrone.
    • 2.1. View of Florence, called the “chain map,” c. 1450. Photo: Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz/Art Resource, New York.
    • 2.2. Church of San Martino al Vescovo, Codex Rustici, fol. 25v, Seminario Arcivescovile, Florence. Photo courtesy of Seminario Arcivescovile, Florence.
    • 2.3. Plan of the neighborhood of the Medici district of the Golden Lion and the parish of San Lorenzo.
    • 2.4. Apollonio di Giovanni, Virgil’s Aeneid, Florence, Biblioteca Riccardiana MS 492, fol. 87r. Photo: Donato Pineider.
    • 2.5. Medici Palace, Florence. Photo: Alinari/Art Resource, New York.
    • 2.6. Masolino, Saint Peter Healing the Lame Man and the Raising of Tabitha. Brancacci Chapel, Santa Maria del Carmine, Florence. Photo: Antonio Quattrone.
    • 2.7. Filippo Dolciati, Antonio Rinaldeschi at the Osteria del Fico, Losing at Gambling. Museo Stibbert, Florence.
    • 2.8. Sandro Botticelli, The Wedding Banquet of Nastagio degli Onesti. Photo: Erich Lessing/Art Resource, New York.
    • 2.9. Stradano, Scene of the Old Market, c. 1561, Sala del Gualdrada, Palazzo della Signoria, Florence. Photo courtesy of Fototeca Berenson, Villa I Tatti.
    • 2.10. Leonardo da Vinci, Ginevra de’Benci, c. 1474–1478, oil on panel. Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund. Image courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
    • 2.11. Filippino Lippi, Double Portrait of Piero del Pugliese and Filippino Lippi, c. 1486, Denver Art Museum: The Simon Guggenheim Memorial Collection, 1955. Photograph © Denver Art Museum.
    • 2.12. The font in the Baptistery, Florence. Photo: Scala/Art Resource, New York.
    • 3.1. Giotto da Bondone, Arena Chapel, Padua, Judas Betrays Christ with a Kiss. Photo: Antonio Quattrone.
    • 3.2. Cathedral of Florence, view of high altar and north and south sacristies. Photo: Alinari/Art Resource, New York.
    • 3.3. Cathedral of Florence, interior of north sacristy, view through the open door to the high altar. Photo: Antonio Quattrone.
    • 3.4. Church of San Lorenzo, Florence, view of nave and crossing. Photo: Alinari/Art Resource, New York.
    • 3.5. Niccolò di Tribolo, known as “Jacone,” Two Seated Men, Casa Buonarroti, Florence. Photo: Antonio Quattrone.
    • 3.6. Raphael Sanzio, Bindo Altoviti. Samuel H. Kress Collection. Image courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
    • 3.7. Sandro Botticelli, Giuliano de’Medici, c. 1478–1480, tempera on panel. Samuel H. Kress Collection. Image courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
    • 3.8. Sandro Botticelli, Young Man Holding a Medal of Cosimo de’Medici. Photo: Scala/Art Resource, New York.
    • 3.9. Bertoldo di Giovanni, 1478, bronze: obverse, Lorenzo de’Medici; reverse, Giuliano de’Medici. Samuel H. Kress Collection. Image courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
    • 3.10. Masaccio, The Tribute Money, Brancacci Chapel, Florence, detail. Saint Peter pays the tax collector. Photo: Antonio Quattrone.
    • 3.11. Masaccio, Distribution of Goods, Brancacci Chapel, Florence, detail. Saint Peter gives alms to a poor woman. Photo: Antonio Quattrone.
    • 3.12. Michelangelo Buonarroti, The Rape of Ganymede, black chalk on off-white paper; wings of eagle incised with stylus and damaged; parts then retouched. Harvard University Art Museums, Fogg Art Museum, Gifts for Special Uses Fund, 1955. Photo: Imaging Department. © President and Fellows of Harvard College.
    • 3.13. Michelangelo Buonarroti, Christ on the Cross, Flanked by Two Lamenting Angels, drawing, 1538–1541. Photo © Trustees of the British Museum.

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