Cover: ‘Yo!’ and ‘Lo!’: The Pragmatic Topography of the Space of Reasons, from Harvard University PressCover: ‘Yo!’ and ‘Lo!’: The Pragmatic Topography of the Space of Reasons in HARDCOVER

‘Yo!’ and ‘Lo!’: The Pragmatic Topography of the Space of Reasons

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$72.50 • £58.95 • €65.50

ISBN 9780674031470

Publication Date: 01/15/2009

Short

256 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

1 halftone, 8 line illustrations

World

  • Acknowledgments
  • 1. Pragmatism, Pragmatics, and Discourse: Mapping the Terrain
    • 1.1 Varieties of Pragmatism
    • 1.2 Two Distinctions among Normative Statuses
    • 1.3 A Typology of Speech Acts
    • 1.4 More about Agent-Relativity and Agent-Neutrality
    • 1.5 Several Caveats
    • 1.6 Entitlement and Epistemic Responsibility
    • 1.7 Where We Go from Here
  • 2. Observatives and the Pragmatics of Perception
    • 2.1 Observatives
    • 2.2 Observatives and Occasion Sentences
    • 2.3 Observing-That and the Declarative Fallacy
    • 2.4 The Ineliminability of the First-Person Voice
  • 3. The Pragmatic Structure of Objectivity
    • 3.1 Observatives, Observation, and Answerability to the World
    • 3.2 Intersubjectivity
    • 3.3 Objectivity
  • 4. Anticlimactic Interlude: Why Performatives Are Not That Important to Us
  • 5. Prescriptives and the Metaphysics of Ought-Claims
    • 5.1 The Pragmatics of Prescriptives
    • 5.2 Four Ways of Telling Someone What to Do
    • 5.3 Two Alternative Accounts
    • 5.4 Reasons, Claims, and Addresses
    • 5.5 Coda: Categorical Imperatives
  • 6. Vocatives, Acknowledgments, and the Pragmatics of Recognition
    • 6.1 Two Kinds of Recognitives
    • 6.2 Vocatives
    • 6.3 Acknowledgments
  • 7. The Essential Second Person
    • 7.1 Concrete Habitation of the Space of Reasons
    • 7.2 Second-Person Speech
    • 7.3 Tellings, Holdings, and Transcendental Vocatives
    • 7.4 Speech as Communication and as Calling
  • 8. Sharing a World
    • 8.1 Interpellation and Induction into Normative Space
    • 8.2 Membership in the Discursive Community
    • 8.3 How Many Discursive Communities Are There?
    • 8.4 Sharing a World and Learning to See
    • 8.5 On the Equiprimordiality and Entanglement of ‘Yo!’ and ‘Lo!’
    • 8.6 Fugue
  • Appendix: Toward a Formal Pragmatics of Normative Statuses [with Greg Restall]
  • Index

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