Cover: What Is Good and Why: The Ethics of Well-Being, from Harvard University PressCover: What Is Good and Why in PAPERBACK

What Is Good and Why

The Ethics of Well-Being

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PAPERBACK

$37.00 • £29.95 • €33.50

ISBN 9780674032378

Publication Date: 05/15/2009

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304 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

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  • Acknowledgments
  • I. In Search of Good
    • 1. A Socratic Question
    • 2. Flourishing and Well-Being
    • 3. Mind and Value
    • 4. Utilitarianism
    • 5. Rawls and the Priority of the Right
    • 6. Right, Wrong, Should
    • 7. The Elimination of Moral Rightness
    • 8. Rules and Good
    • 9. Categorical Imperatives
    • 10. Conflicting Interests
    • 11. Whose Good? The Egoist’s Answer
    • 12. Whose Good? The Utilitarian’s Answer
    • 13. Self-Denial, Self-Love, Universal Concern
    • 14. Pain, Self-Love, and Altruism
    • 15. Agent-Neutrality and Agent-Relativity
  • II. Good, Conation, and Pleasure
    • 16. “Good” and “Good for”
    • 17. “Good for” and Advantage
    • 18. “Good that” and “Bad that”
    • 19. Pleasure and Advantage
    • 20. Good for S That P
    • 21. The “for” of “Good for”
    • 22. Plants, Animals, Humans
    • 23. Ross on Human Nature
    • 24. The Perspectival Reading of “Good for”
    • 25. The Conative Approach to Well-Being
    • 26. Abstracting from the Content of Desires and Plans
    • 27. The Faulty Mechanisms of Desire Formation
    • 28. Infants and Adults
    • 29. The Conation of an Ideal Self
    • 30. The Appeal of the Conative Theory
    • 31. Conation Hybridized
    • 32. Strict Hedonism
    • 33. Hedonism Diluted
  • III. Prolegomenon to Flourishing
    • 34. Development and Flourishing: The General Theory
    • 35. Development and Flourishing: The Human Case
    • 36. More Examples of What Is Good
    • 37. Appealing to Nature
    • 38. Sensory Un-flourishing
    • 39. Affective Flourishing and Un-flourishing
    • 40. Hobbes on Tranquillity and Restlessness
    • 41. Flourishing and Un-flourishing as a Social Being
    • 42. Cognitive Flourishing and Un-flourishing
    • 43. Sexual Flourishing and Un-flourishing
    • 44. Too Much and Too Little
    • 45. Comparing Lives and Stages of Life
    • 46. Adding Goods: Rawls’s Principle of Inclusiveness
    • 47. Art, Science, and Culture
    • 48. Self-Sacrifice
    • 49. The Vanity of Fame
    • 50. The Vanity of Wealth
    • 51. Making Others Worse-Off
    • 52. Virtues and Flourishing
    • 53. The Good of Autonomy
    • 54. What Is Good and Why
  • IV. The Sovereignty of Good
    • 55. The Importance of What Is Good for Us
    • 56. Good’s Insufficiency
    • 57. Promises
    • 58. Retribution
    • 59. Cosmic Justice
    • 60. Social Justice
    • 61. Pure Antipaternalism
    • 62. Moral Space and Giving Aid
    • 63. Slavery
    • 64. Torture
    • 65. Moral Rightness Revisited
    • 66. Lying
    • 67. Honoring the Dead
    • 68. Meaningless Goals and Symbolic Value
    • 69. Good-Independent Realms of Value
    • 70. Good Thieves and Good Human Beings
    • 71. Final Thoughts
  • Works Cited
  • Index

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