Cover: Naming Infinity: A True Story of Religious Mysticism and Mathematical Creativity, from Harvard University PressCover: Naming Infinity in HARDCOVER

Naming Infinity

A True Story of Religious Mysticism and Mathematical Creativity

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$26.50 • £21.95 • €24.00

ISBN 9780674032934

Publication Date: 03/31/2009

Short

256 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

34 halftones, 3 line illustrations

Belknap Press

World

  • List of Illustrations*
  • Introduction
  • 1. Storming a Monastery
  • 2. A Crisis in Mathematics
  • 3. The French Trio: Borel, Lebesgue, Baire
  • 4. The Russian Trio: Egorov, Luzin, Florensky
  • 5. Russian Mathematics and Mysticism
  • 6. The Legendary Lusitania
  • 7. Fates of the Russian Trio
  • 8. Lusitania and After
  • 9. The Human in Mathematics, Then and Now
  • Appendix: Luzin’s Personal Archives
  • Notes
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index
  • * Illustrations:
    • Framed photos of Dmitri Egorov and Pavel Florensky. Photographed by Loren Graham in the basement of the Church of St. Tatiana the Martyr, 2004.
    • Monastery of St. Pantaleimon, Mt. Athos, Greece.
    • Larger and larger circles with segment approaching straight line, as suggested by Nicholas of Cusa.
    • Cantor ternary set.
    • Émile Borel. Reproduced by permission of Institut Mittag-Leffler and Acta Mathematica.
    • Henri Poincaré. Reproduced by permission of Institut Mittag-Leffler and Acta Mathematica.
    • Henri Lebesgue. Reproduced by permission of L’enseignement mathématique.
    • René Baire. Reproduced by permission of Institut Mittag-Leffler and Acta Mathematica.
    • Arnaud Denjoy.
    • Jacques Hadamard. Reproduced by permission of Institut Mittag-Leffler and Acta Mathematica.
    • Charles-émile Picard. Reproduced by permission of Institut Mittag-Leffler and Acta Mathematica.
    • Hotel Parisiana on the rue Tournefort in Paris, c. 1915. Reproduced from Anna Radwan, Mémoire des rues (Paris: Parimagine, 2006), p. 111.
    • Nikolai Luzin in 1917. Courtesy of Uspekhi matematicheskikh nauk.
    • Pavel Florensky. From Charles E. Ford, “Dmitrii Egorov: Mathematics and Religion in Moscow,” The Mathematical Intelligencer, 13 (1991), pp. 24–30. Reproduced with the kind permission of Springer Science and Business Media.
    • Building of the old Moscow State University where the Lusitania seminars were held. Photograph by Loren Graham.
    • Luzin’s apartment on Arbat Street, Moscow. Photograph by Loren Graham.
    • Interior of Church of St. Tatiana the Martyr, Moscow. Photograph by Loren Graham.
    • Nikolai Luzin, Waclaw Sierpinski, and Dmitri Egorov in Egorov’s apartment in Moscow. Photograph courtesy of N. S. Ermolaeva and Springer Science and Business Media.
    • Otto Shmidt. Courtesy of the Shmidt Institute of Physics of the Earth, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow. [Link]
    • “A Temple of the Machine-Worshippers.” Drawing by Vladimir Krinski, c. 1925.
    • Ernst Kol’man. Reproduced with the permission of Chalidze Publications from Ernst Kol’man, My ne dolzhny byli tak zhit’ (New York: Chalidze Publications, 1982).
    • Nikolai Chebotaryov. Courtesy of the State University of Kazan, the Museum of History.
    • Hospital in Kazan where Maria Smirnitskaia tried to save Egorov. Photograph by Loren Graham, 2004.
    • Dmitri Egorov’s gravestone, Arskoe Cemetery, Kazan. Photograph by Loren Graham, 2004.
    • Nina Bari. Courtesy of Douglas Ewan Cameron, from his collection of pictures in the history of mathematics and Uspekhi matematicheskikh nauk.
    • The Luzins with the Denjoy family on the island of Oléron, Brittany. Courtesy of N. S. Ermolaeva.
    • Peter Kapitsa. Courtesy of the Institute of the History of Science and Technology, Academy of Sciences, Moscow, and Sergei Kapitsa.
    • Genealogical chart of the Moscow School of Mathematics.
    • Ludmila Keldysh. Courtesy of A. Chernavsky, “Ljudmila Vsevolodovna Keldysh (to her centenary),” Newsletter of the European Mathematical Society, 58 (December 2005), p. 27.
    • Lev Shnirel’man. Courtesy of Uspekhi matematicheskikh nauk.
    • Pavel Alexandrov, L. E. J. Brouwer, and Pavel Uryson in Amsterdam, 1924. Courtesy of Douglas Ewan Cameron, from his collection of pictures in the history of mathematics.
    • Grave of Pavel Uryson (Urysohn) at Batz-sur-Mer, France. Photograph by Jean-Michel Kantor.
    • Pavel Alexandrov. Courtesy of Douglas Ewan Cameron, from his collection of pictures in the history of mathematics.
    • Andrei Kolmogorov. Courtesy of Uspekhi matematicheskikh nauk.
    • Pavel Alexandrov swimming. Courtesy of Douglas Ewan Cameron, from his collection of pictures in the history of mathematics.
    • Alexandrov and Kolmogorov together. Courtesy of Douglas Ewan Cameron, from his collection of pictures in the history of mathematics.

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